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Training Package on EU Water Legislation

Quiz on: Water quality sector specific legislation

# of questions you got right:

The questions you got wrong:

Grade in percentage:

1) The scope of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive extends to:
a) all marine waters over which a Member States has jurisdiction in accordance with the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (“UNCLOS”).
b) its exclusive economic zone.
c) the waters covered by the Water Framework Directive.
d) the marine waters over which a Member State has jurisdiction in accordance with the UNCLOS as well as coastal waters subject to the Water Framework Directive in so far as particular aspects thereof are not taken into account in other legislation.

2) The objective of the Marine Strategy Water Directive is:
a) the same as that of the Water Framework Directive.
b) that no marine waters become vulnerable or sensitive.
c) good environmental status for each marine region or sub-region.
d) that no case of force majeure modifies or alters the physical characteristics of marine waters.

3) Water intended for human consumption should be:
a) compliant with food legislation standards applicable to mineral bottled water.
b) with a maximum concentration of ten micrograms of lead per litre without further requirements.
c) free from any microorganisms, parasites, and other substances constituting a potential danger to human health.
d) free from all heavy metals and other hazardous substances.

4) Points of compliance in private buildings with the standards of water quality intended for human consumption are:
a) the actual taps normally used for human consumption.
b) the point of entry into the private building.
c) the actual taps normally used for human consumption but the Member State is deemed to have fulfilled its obligations if non-compliance is due to the domestic distribution system inside the building.
d) the point of entry into the collecting system.

5) Points of compliance in premises and establishments where water is supplied to the public with the standards of water quality intended for human consumption are:
a) the actual taps normally used for human consumption.
b) the point of entry into the private building.
c) the actual taps normally used for human consumption but with the Member States being deemed to have fulfilled their obligations where non-compliance is due to the domestic distribution system inside the building.
d) the point of entry into the collecting system.

6) Bathing waters falling within the scope of the Bathing Waters Directive include any element of surface water:
a) listed in Appendix 1 to the Directive.
b) included in swimming-pools and spa pools.
c) where people actually bathe at any given time during a period of 2 consecutive months per year.
d) where the competent authority expects a large number of people to bathe and has not imposed a permanent bathing prohibition or issued permanent advice against bathing.

7) In the case of classification of bathing water as “poor quality”, national authorities must:
a) prohibit bathing.
b) take measures to prevent, reduce, or eliminate the causes of pollution.
c) take adequate management measures including a bathing prohibition or advise against bathing, identify the causes and reasons for that quality level and take measures to prevent, reduce or eliminate the causes of pollution.
d) authorise bathing at bathers' own risk, identify the causes and reasons for the quality level and adopt adequate measures to prevent, reduce, or eliminate the causes of pollution.

8) Current bathing water classification and any bathing prohibition or advice against bathing must be made known to the general public:
a) by way of radio and televisions.
b) by way of the written press.
c) on the European Commission’s website.
d) by means of a clear and simple sign or symbol in non-technical language as well as by appropriate media and technologies in several languages where appropriate.

 


Developed by the Academy of European Law (ERA)