ITU-T G.9959

ITU-T G.9959

Subject: 
Home
Sub-subject: 
Domotics and home automation
Reference: 
ITU-T G.9959
Title: 
ITU-T G.9959: Short range narrow-band digital radiocommunication transceivers - PHY and MAC layer specifications (Z-Wave)
Kind of resource: 
Standard
Year of publication: 
2015
Description: 
Z-Wave is a wireless communications protocol designed for home automation, specifically to remotely control applications in residential and light commercial environments. The technology uses a low-power RF radio embedded or retrofitted into home electronics devices and systems, such as lighting, home access control, entertainment systems and household appliances. [Source: Wikipedia] . Z-Wave communicates using a low-power wireless technology designed specifically for remote control applications. The Z-Wave wireless protocol is optimized for reliable, low-latency communication of small data packets, unlike Wi-Fi and other IEEE 802.11-based wireless LAN systems that are designed primarily for high-bandwidth data flow. Z-Wave operates in the sub-gigahertz frequency range, around 900 MHz. This band competes with some cordless telephones and other consumer electronics devices, but avoids interference with Wi-Fi and other systems that operate on the crowded 2.4 GHz band. Z-Wave is designed to be easily embedded in consumer electronics products, including battery operated devices such as remote controls, smoke alarms and security sensors. Z-Wave was developed by a Danish startup called Zen-Sys that was acquired by Sigma Designs in 2008. Z-Wave is currently supported by over 160 manufacturers worldwide and appears in a broad range of consumer products in the U.S., Europe and Asia. The standard itself is not open and is available only to Sigma-Designs customers under non-disclosure agreement. All these product share the Z-Wave transceiver chip that is supplied by Sigma Designs and Mitsumi. Some Z-Wave product vendors have embraced the open source and hobbyist communities. Z-Wave is a proprietary wireless protocol oriented to the residential control and automation market. Conceptually, Z-Wave is intended to provide a simple yet reliable method to wirelessly control lights and appliances in your house. To meet these design parameters, Zensys's or Sigma Designs Z-Wave package includes a chip with a low data rate that offers reliable data delivery along with simplicity and flexibility. Z-Wave works in industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band on the single frequency using frequency-shift keying (FSK) radio. The throughput is 40Kb/sec (9.6Kb/sec using old chips) and suitable for control and sensor applications. Each Z-Wave network may include up to 232 nodes and consists of two sets of nodes: controllers and slave devices. Nodes may be configured to retransmit the message in order to guarantee connectivity in multipath environment of residential house. Average communication distance between two nodes is 100 feet, and with message ability to hop up to four times between nodes, it gives enough coverage for most residential houses. [Source: Wikipedia]
Keywords: 
AAL, wireless, protocol, narrow-band, digital, radiocommunication
Organisation: 
ITU
Geographical area: 
International