Making the EU more attractive for foreign students

Europe currently attracts 45% of all international students. But as the numbers of mobile students increase, so do the options for study, and European universities will have to compete more to attract talent from around the world.

What is it?

Students and researchers from non-EU countries can contribute to growth and competitiveness with knowledge and skills developed in Europe. Erasmus Mundus joint master degrees are an example of an action to increase the appeal of the EU as a top study and research destination.

Why is it needed?

Europe currently attracts 45% of all international students. But as the numbers of mobile students increase, so do the options for study, and European universities will have to compete more to attract talent from around the world.

What has been done so far?

Study in Europe

Many Member States actively promote their own higher education systems. The Commission's Study in Europe project provides a platform to promote all these countries, and to help students make an informed choice about a study destination in countries throughout Europe.

Study in Europe provides a web portal and social media activity. Under this banner, the EC and EU Delegations take part in study fairs worldwide. The Commission networks with national promotion agencies throughout Europe to share calendars and ideas.

Alumni

Alumni organisations are active ambassadors for European higher education in their home countries, participate in study fairs and events, and serve as information multipliers concerning the possibilities to study or research in Europe.

The Commission supports the Erasmus+ Student and Alumni Alliance, ESAA, which helps alumni to do all the above, and to develop and share their professional skills and/or academic knowledge through networking. New associations for alumni in other regions (Western Balkans and Africa) are also being set up.