• QOSMOS: cognitive radio technology optimises use of scarce spectrum
      Projects story28 May 2015

      As the number and variety of smartphones and other connected devices keeps growing, the need for radio spectrum grows with it. Cognitive radio technology developed under the EU-funded QOSMOS project could help meet these needs while controlling telecom costs, improving service and driving the development of new markets.

    • A boost to your mobile signal
      a picture illustrating the story
      Projects story24 January 2013

      When using your mobile phone, it doesn't take much to lose that precious signal — just turning a corner or riding on a train can be enough. EU-funded research is developing new technologies to eradicate those annoying 'black holes' in wireless coverage, while freeing up some mobile network capacity at the same time.

    • Big data at your service
      Folder with cabinet
      Projects story25 July 2012

      'Open data' is the idea that certain data should be freely available to everyone to use and republish as they wish, without restrictions from copyright, patents or other mechanisms of control. The increasing use of ICT for business, leisure and public services is leading to the accumulation of mountains of structured and in many cases unstructured data. But this so-called 'big data' should be seen as an opportunity not a problem. EU research and efforts to promote open data are helping to make sense and good use of this resource.

    • Communicate with the future
      A picture illustrating the story
      Projects story19 June 2012

      Digital information comes in myriad forms and formats, so how can we make sure that today's data is not lost forever in inaccessible legacy forms? An EU-funded project has developed a framework that ensures we will always be able to use data, however and wherever it is saved and stored.

    • P2P comes to the rescue of Internet video
      A picture illustrating the story
      Projects story13 June 2012

      Peer-to-peer applications sometimes have a bad name because of Internet piracy. But the same technology that has long helped Internet users illegally share copyrighted music, games and videos now promises to help content providers stream video to millions of viewers simultaneously using a fraction of the bandwidth of traditional methods. The transition is being helped by EU-funded research.

    • Broadband - 'big pipes' of potential growth
      A picture illustrating the story
      Projects story13 June 2012

      The internet has become much more than a communication system. Today, it is the backbone of modern society, a platform for businesses, governments and citizens to exchange news and views, as well as to provide services, whether essential or trivial. EU policies aim to extend access to high-speed broadband internet and increase investment in fibre-optic infrastructure, while its support for research efforts ensure that the EU will have the technology available to meet the strain of constantly rising demands.

    • 116006 - Victims of crime
      116006 - Victims of crime
      Projects story31 May 2012

      The 116 006 helpline for victims of crime gives people emotional support, informs them of their rights and how to use these, while also referring victims to relevant organisations. As a single access point, it provides information about local police and criminal justice proceedings, possibilities for compensation and insurance matters, and other sources of help for victims of crime. There is a strong belief among respondents to the Eurobarometer Survey of 2012 that a free Europe-wide number for helplines for victims of crime is a useful service of social value. 90% of people in Europe think that a free Europe-wide single number for helplines for victims of crime is a useful service , with just 9% saying that it is not useful. Almost two-thirds of respondents (65%) see it as very useful, with 25% describing it as fairly useful. Just 7% think such number is not very useful, while a further 2% say that it is not at all useful.

    • 116111 Child Helplines
      Usefulness of 116111 in EU27
      Projects story31 May 2012

      The number 116 111 for child helplines is addressed directly to children who seek someone to talk to and provide assistance. The service helps children in need of care and protection and links them to services and resources; it provides children with an opportunity to express their concerns, talk about issues directly affecting them or contact someone in distress. A clear majority of respondents to the Eurobarometer Survey of 2012 think that a free Europe-wide number for child helplines is a useful service. Overall, 90% of European respondents to the Eurobarometer Survey of 2012 think that a free Europe-wide single number for child helplines is a useful service , with just 8% saying that it is not useful.

    • 116123 - Emotional support helpline
      Usefulness of 116123 in EU27
      Projects story31 May 2012

      116 123, has been reserved for emotional support helplines. The line gives moral support to adults who are suffering from loneliness, are in a state of psychological crisis or thinking about committing suicide. Overall, 83% of people in the European Union think that a free Europe-wide single number for emotional support helplines is a useful service , with 15% saying that it is not useful (i.e. either not at all useful or not very useful). While the support for a free Europe-wide number for emotional support helplines somewhat below other 116 services, it is still considerable, as 50% of respondents say that a free Europe-wide number for emotional support helplines is very useful and 33% describe it as fairly useful. Only 11% see it as not very useful, while 4% say it is not at all useful.

    • 116117 - Non-emergency medical Assistance
      Usefulness of 116117 in EU27
      Projects story31 May 2012

      The 116 117 non-emergency medical on-call service directs callers to medical assistance when the need is urgent but not life-threatening (in cases of emergency, you should call 112). The number aims to connect the caller to a skilled call-handler or a qualified medical practitioner who could provide on-call medical assistance or advice.This is especially useful outside normal office hours, during the weekend or public holidays. A free Europe-wide number for non-emergency medical on-call service helplines is seen in much the same light as a number for emotional support helplines, with support for these services strong across the European Union, but not quite as strong as for the first three services. Almost half of the respondents (49%) say this kind of helpline is very useful, while 31% of people say it is fairly useful. Only 13% see it as not very useful, with 5% not finding it to be at all useful.

Pages