• CiViQ | Providing long-term reliable data privacy
      PROJECTS & INITIATIVES

      All questions answered by Prof. Dr. Valerio Pruneri from the Institute of Photonic Sciences, Spain. What do you want to achieve in this project? Ever-increasing computational capabilities, including quantum computers , pose serious threat to the digital data security. Our belief is that integration of Quantum Key Distribution ( QKD ) into modern telecom networks is a realistic strategy to provide long-term reliable data privacy.

    • QIA | Bringing the Quantum Internet to Europe
      PROJECTS & INITIATIVES

      All questions answered by Prof. Stephanie Wehner from the Technische Universiteit Delft, Netherlands. What do you want to achieve in this project? The Quantum Internet Alliance ( QIA ) targets a Blueprint for a pan-European Quantum Internet by ground-breaking technological advances, culminating in the first experimental demonstration of a fully integrated software stack running on a multi-node quantum network.

    • PASQuanS | Next generation Quantum Simulation platforms for real-world problems in industry
      PROJECTS & INITIATIVES

      All questions answered by Prof. Andrew Daley from the University of Strathclyde, United Kingdom. What do you want to achieve in this project? Quantum Simulation aims at addressing questions in fundamental science, materials development, quantum chemistry and real-world problems of high importance in industry. PASQuanS will develop next generation Quantum Simulation platforms for such applications. It builds on the impressive achievements of the most advanced Quantum Simulation platforms to date, based on atoms and ions, for which systems of several hundreds of qubits have been realised.

    • AQTION | Advanced quantum computing with trapped ions
      PROJECTS & INITIATIVES

      All questions answered by Dr. Thomas Monz from the Universität Innsbruck, Austria. What do you want to achieve in this project? The AQTION project will realise a scalable European quantum computer that is based on the manipulation of single-charged atoms. Here, each charged atom or ion corresponds to a quantum bit – the smallest unit of quantum information. We will realise registers with up to 50 qubits , control each of the quantum bits individually with high performance, to realise a device that can achieve a computational advantage over all known classical computers.

    • OpenSuperQ | A quantum computer based on superconducting integrated circuits
      PROJECTS & INITIATIVES

      All questions answered by Frank Wilhelm-Mauch from the Universität des Saarlandes, Germany. What do you want to achieve in this project? We want to build a quantum computer with up to 100 qubits and high-precision operations through the OpenSuperQ project . This is a size that, in certain tasks, by far outperforms today’s classical supercomputers. The quantum computer will have integrated circuits made from superconductors at its core while offering the complete hardware and software stack for a functioning computer with a programming interface.