The reports for the Interim Evaluation of the ECSEL Joint Undertaking and the Final Evaluation of the ARTEMIS and ENIAC Joint Undertakings have been produced by a panel of independent experts.

The Interim Evaluation of the ECSEL Joint Undertaking and the Final Evaluation of the ARTEMIS and ENIAC Joint Undertakings have been prepared, according to article 11 of the founding act of the ECSEL Joint Undertaking, Council Regulation (EU) No 561/2014. The report on the interim evaluation of ECSEL will also be linked to the Commission Staff Working Document on the Interim Evaluations of all JUs under Horizon 2020.

ARTEMIS and ENIAC Joint Undertakings

Overall the ENIAC and ARTEMIS JUs have been successful in increasing the private and public investment in the domains of nanoelectronics and embedded systems. 119 projects have been funded with EUR 630 million of EC funding leveraged with EUR 912 million of national contributions. Industry has contributed EUR 2.46 billion of funding overall resulting in EUR 4 billion. It is estimated that each Euro contributed by the EC has resulted in 6.4 Euros of research and innovation activity in Europe.

The JU approach has been successful in bringing together EU, national and industrial actors to pursue common goals. Although a global strategy across Europe for Electronic Components and Systems is the ultimate goal with a focus on the key application domains such as automotive, health, energy, etc., there is still some work needed to achieve this in practice by further integration of CPS and electronics. The tri-partite nature of funding has the advantage of reducing fragmentation across Europe but this is at the expense of complex administration and is subject to changing priorities.

Both JUs have made considerable efforts to align their activities with other programmes which have similar goals, such as with CATRENE. By providing a focus for research efforts, they were able to foster collaboration between all stakeholders such as industry, including small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), national authorities, and academic and research centres. Analysis shows overlaps in coherence with other EC and National programmes, suggesting an added effort needed. A key aim has been to engage with the SME community which accounts for 99% of companies across Europe (20.7M), 2/3 of European jobs and 85% of new jobs. Positively it was noted from analysis that 29% of ARTEMIS and 27% of ENIAC applicants are SMEs, closely meeting the goals set within H2020.

ECSEL Joint Undertaking

ECSEL brings together two previous JUs that addressed the areas of embedded systems (ARTEMIS) and nanoelectronics (ENIAC) with the EPoSS European Technology Platform on Smart Systems Integration. It has been successful in increasing the private and public investment in Electronics Components and Systems. Six calls were launched between 2014 and 2016 and 39 projects have been selected for a total funding of EUR 1.96 billion. Industry provided 56% of these funds. In terms of gearing each Euro contributed by the EC has resulted in 4.3 Euros of research and innovation activity in Europe. Overall considering the previous ARTEMIS and ENIAC JUs combined with the ECSEL JU, 171 projects valued at over EUR 6 billion have been funded resulting in 3972 participations and 1000’s of researchers being employed.

The transition from ARTEMIS, ENIAC and EPoSS into a combined JU has not been without difficulty. The communities have made considerable efforts to try and integrate their activities into a single community representing the Electronics Components and Systems domain. The introduction of Lighthouse initiatives that cluster projects to tackle sectoral issues, e.g. smart factories and automotive applications, is seen as a very positive development. ECSEL is unique in adoption of a tri-partite funding strategy.

The success in joining EU, national and industrial actors to pursue common goals, in the Electronic Components and Systems global strategy across Europe, can already be seen as a direct result of the JU approach. Though not an easy task and at the expense of complex administration, the tri-partite nature of funding has the advantage of reducing fragmentation across Europe.

Related documents: