To mark International Women’s Day, Mariya Gabriel, European Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society, revealed today the complete online series of remarkable historical women in the arts & sciences, in collaboration with Europeana.

Discover the complete exhibition of outstanding European women that made history in the arts and sciences

The Pioneers exhibition celebrates innovative European women who have made significant contributions to art, science and society, blazing trails of courage, creativity and fine sentiment. Their extraordinary historical mark continues to be fully recognised today. The Commissioner said:

The stories of brilliant, determined and talented women must serve to inspire young girls and women all over Europe. Let the experiences of these female role models encourage the generations of women to come to continue to innovate, explore, create, push all the boundaries they might encounter, and finally, make their own contributions to a competitive, dynamic and inclusive digital Europe.

The collection kick-started on 18 January with one of the biggest names in science, Maria Skłodowska-Curie, followed by other inspirational stories of the achievements of remarkable European women. It culminates today with Dora Gabe, who is one of the most successful and beloved Bulgarian poets.

Background

The exhibition is part of the Commissioner’s strategy to increase women's participation in the digital economy and to empower them to play a more active role in the digital age. In response to the reported decrease in the already small number of women that study and work in ICT related areas, the strategy focuses on making progress in three areas: challenging gender stereotypes in the digital economy, promoting girls' and women's digital skills and education, and advocating for more women entrepreneurs and innovators.

Europeana actively supports online accessibility of cultural heritage resources and their use and re-use across EU countries. Building on ten years of working towards increasing the visibility of Europe’s digitised cultural heritage, Europeana currently provides access to over 58 million cultural items from more than 3,700 libraries, archives, museums and collections. Its collections cover a variety of themes from art and fashion to photography and sport, reflecting European cultural history from pre-history to the present day.