Digital Agenda for Europe
A Europe 2020 Initiative

Sweden

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Spider chart showing Sweden's score in connectivity, human capital, digital public services, use of internet and integration of digital technology compared to the EU average score
Find here the most recent analysis and data by country. A selection of key documents and graphs are shown about topics such as broadband, internet activity and skills, egovernment, ICT in schools, research and innovation, as well as other main indicators.
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In DESI 2015, Sweden has an overall score[1] of 0.66 and ranks 2nd out of the 28 EU Member States. Sweden scores among the top five in all DESI dimensions. Fixed broadband is available to 99% of homes. This is remarkable given Sweden's geographical configuration. High speed broadband networks are available to 71% of homes and 99% of homes are covered by mobile 4G/LTE technology. 91% of Swedes use the internet. 4.8% of the workforce are ICT specialists, almost twice as much as the EU average, but demand of ICT professionals in Sweden outstrips supply. Although 80% of internet users shop online, and 30% of them buy online from other countries, only 7.7% of Sweden's SMEs sell online across borders.

Sweden falls into the cluster of high‑performance[2] countries.

 
DESISwedenClusterEU
rankscorescorescore
DESI 201520.660.650.47
DESI 201420.630.620.44

1. Connectivity

1 ConnectivitySwedenClusterEU
rankscorescorescore
DESI 201540.690.670.55
DESI 201430.660.630.51

 

With an overall Connectivity score of 0.69 Sweden ranks 4th among EU countries, although it loses one rank compared to last year.

 

 SwedenEU
DESI 2015DESI 2014DESI 2015
valuerankvaluerankvalue
1a1 Fixed BB Coverage
% households
99%
(2013)
 1299%
(2013)
1297%
(2013)
1a2 Fixed BB Take-up
% households
67%
(2014)
 1568%
(2013)
1170%
(2014)
1b1 Mobile BB Take-up
Subscribers per 100 people
110
(2014)
 2110
(2013)
267
(2014)
1b2 Spectrum
% of the target for spectrum to be harmonised at EU level
96%
(2014)
 496%
(2013)
370%
(2014)
1c1 NGA Coverage
% households, out of all households
71%
(2013)
 1671%
(2013)
1662%
(2013)
1c2 Subscriptions to Fast BB
% of subscriptions >= 30Mbps, out of fixed BB subscriptions
42%
(2014)
 832%
(2013)
922%
(2014)
1d1 Fixed BB Price
% individual gross income spent for the cheapest standalone Fixed Broadband subscription (lower values are better)
1.1%
(2014)
 60.91%
(2013)
21.3%
(2014)

 

At the end of 2013, fixed broadband was available to 99% of homes in Sweden (97% in the EU). In rural areas, fixed broadband covered 92% of homes. At the same time, Next Generation Access capable of providing at least 30 Mbps download was available to 71% of homes (62% in the EU) and 4th generation (LTE) networks to 99%. These results are remarkable given the geographical configuration of the country.

The take up of fixed and mobile broadband have been flat during the past year. However the share of high speed connections (providing at least 30 Mbps) is higher than the EU average (42% compared to 22% in the EU). Further sustained roll-out of Next Generation Access broadband networks could further developments in the Swedish digital economy.

2. Human Capital

2 Human CapitalSwedenClusterEU
rankscorescorescore
DESI 201520.750.730.54
DESI 201420.750.730.52

 

With a Human Capital score of 0.75, Sweden ranks, like last year, 2nd among EU countries. Swedish citizens are overall active internet users compared to the EU average and overall have a good basic set of skills.

 

 SwedenEU
DESI 2015DESI 2014DESI 2015
valuerankvaluerankvalue
2a1 Internet Users
% individuals (aged 16-74)
91%
(2014)
 492%
(2013)
375%
(2014)
2a2 Basic Digital Skills
% individuals (aged 16-74)
78%
(2014)
 375%
(2012)
459%
(2014)
2b1 ICT Specialists
% employed individuals
4.8%
(2013)
 14.8%
(2012)
12.8%
(2013)
2b2 STEM Graduates
Graduates in STEM per 1000 individuals (aged 20 to 29)
16
(2012)
 1616
(2012)
1617
(2012)

 

Overall, 91% of Swedish people use the internet and 78% of them have the basic digital skills that allow them to partake in the possibilities offered by the internet and to benefit from the opportunities offered by a digital society and economy.

Furthermore, Sweden also avails of the highest number of ICT specialists in the workforce[3] in Europe, almost double of the EU average value. This allows Sweden to further increase the competitiveness of the Swedish economy. However, results of a representative Empirica survey of CIO‘s and HR managers in eight European countries in 2012 shows that demand for ICT professionals in Sweden outstrips supply. Relative to its ICT workforce, the excess demand in Sweden is large (one vacancy is reported per 13 existing ICT-jobs). Hence it is important that Sweden upholds efforts in human capital development.

3. Use of Internet

3 Use of InternetSwedenClusterEU
rankscorescorescore
DESI 201510.60.560.41
DESI 201420.540.520.39

 

Use of Internet is the DESI 2015 dimension in which Sweden performs better than any other EU country, with its population actively engaging in a multitude of on-line services.

 

 SwedenEU
DESI 2015DESI 2014DESI 2015
valuerankvaluerankvalue
3a1 News
% individuals who used Internet in the last 3 months (aged 16-74)
88%
(2014)
 384%
(2013)
767%
(2014)
3a2 Music, Videos and Games
% individuals who used Internet in the last 3 months (aged 16-74)
57%
(2014)
 660%
(2012)
449%
(2014)
3a3 Video on Demand
% households that have a TV
44%
(2013)
 844%
(2013)
839%
(2013)
3a4 IPTV
% households that have a TV
16%
(2013)
 1116%
(2013)
1113%
(2013)
3b1 Video Calls
% individuals who used Internet in the last 3 months (aged 16-74)
52%
(2014)
 641%
(2013)
1137%
(2014)
3b2 Social Networks
% individuals who used Internet in the last 3 months (aged 16-74)
70%
(2014)
 660%
(2013)
1758%
(2014)
3c1 Banking
% individuals who used Internet in the last 3 months (aged 16-74)
88%
(2014)
 486%
(2013)
557%
(2014)
3c2 Shopping
% individuals who used Internet in the last year (aged 16-74)
80%
(2014)
 376%
(2013)
463%
(2014)

 

A digital economy is partly fuelled by its citizens’ consumption in the online channel and Swedish Internet users engage in a broad range of online activities. They read news online (88%), listen to music, watch films and play games online (57%), use the Internet to communicate via video calls (52%) or through social networks (70%), and obtain video content using their broadband connections (mostly though Video on Demand – 44%). 80% of internet users shop online, but they have a preference for shopping at home, since only 30% of them do so cross border.

4. Integration of Digital Technology

4 Integration of Digital TechnologySwedenClusterEU
rankscorescorescore
DESI 201520.490.470.33
DESI 201410.450.410.3

 

Sweden ranks 2nd among EU countries with regard to business digitisation and eCommerce activities. Despite losing a rank, its score has improved from 0.45 to 0.49.

 

 SwedenEU
DESI 2015DESI 2014DESI 2015
valuerankvaluerankvalue
4a1 Electronic Information Sharing
% enterprises (no financial sector, 10+ employees)
43%
(2014)
 345%
(2013)
131%
(2014)
4a2 RFID
% enterprises (no financial sector, 10+ employees)
2.7%
(2014)
 231.5%
(2011)
153.8%
(2014)
4a3 Social Media
% enterprises (no financial sector, 10+ employees)
20%
(2014)
 821%
(2013)
514%
(2014)
4a4 eInvoices
% enterprises (no financial sector, 10+ employees)
23%
(2014)
 322%
(2013)
311%
(2014)
4a5 Cloud
% enterprises (no financial sector, 10+ employees)
27%
(2014)
 3n.a.-11%
(2014)
4b1 SMEs Selling Online
% SMEs (no financial sector, 10+ employees)
24%
(2014)
 423%
(2013)
315%
(2014)
4b2 eCommerce Turnover
% turnover of SMEs (no financial sector, 10-249 employees)
14%
(2014)
 47.1%
(2013)
178.8%
(2014)
4b3 Selling Online Cross-border
% SMEs (no financial sector, 10+ employees)
7.7%
(2013)
 147.7%
(2013)
146.5%
(2013)

 

A true digital economy is one where businesses take full advantage of the possibilities and benefits offered by digital technologies, both to improve their efficiency and productivity, as well as to reach costumers and realise sales. Swedish businesses are performing very well in this area. They adopt cloud computing, sell online and use electronic invoicing.

The adoption of digital technologies is an important driver of labour productivity growth. Swedish companies should continue to integrate their internal processes using electronic information sharing and to use social media as a communication tool.

5. Digital Public Services

5 Digital Public ServicesSwedenClusterEU
rankscorescorescore
DESI 201550.710.770.47
DESI 201450.750.790.45

 

Digital Public Services is the dimension where Sweden performs the weakest of all its DESI 2015 dimensions, albeit maintaining the 5th place in the EU.

 

 SwedenEU
DESI 2015DESI 2014DESI 2015
valuerankvaluerankvalue
5a1 eGovernment Users
% individuals returning filled forms, out of Internet users in the last year (aged 16-74)
54%
(2014)
 548%
(2013)
433%
(2014)
5a2 Pre-filled Forms
Score (0 to 100)
75
(2014)
 677
(2013)
445
(2014)
5a3 Online Service Completion
Score (0 to 100)
87
(2014)
 983
(2013)
975
(2014)
5a4 Open Data
Score (0 to 700)
300
(2014)
 18n.a.-380
(2014)
5b1 Medical Data Exchange
% General Practitioners
56%
(2013)
 656%
(2013)
636%
(2013)
5b2 ePrescription
% General Practitioners
97%
(2013)
 497%
(2013)
427%
(2013)

Modern public services offered online in an efficient manner are a vehicle for reducing spending in the public administration as well as for driving efficiency gains for enterprises, citizens and the public administration. Its indicator scores[4] illustrate that Sweden is performing well above the EU average with regard to the provision of eGovernment services as well as with the uptake thereof. Sweden and Denmark for example have a well functioning eGovernment portal for citizens wanting to work in each other’s country. However, given the country’s leading position in the digital economy and society, a further improvement of eGovernment services provision would produce a greater benefit and raise usage figures as well.

The efficiency and degree of service offered by health systems can be greatly improved through digitisation and Sweden is among the top performers in the EU. Almost all General Practitioners (97%) digitally transfer prescriptions to pharmacists and slightly more than half of them (56%) use electronic networks to exchange medical data with other health care providers and professionals. Sweden has developed an innovative system of first-aid for victims of heart attacks, based on an SMS alert system and a network of volunteers.

 

[1] DESI scores range from 0 to 1, the higher the score the better the country performance.

[2] In the DESI 2015, the high-performance cluster of countries comprises Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, and Sweden.

[3] Broad definition taken from JRC (IPTS) "The evolution of EU ICT employment 2000-2012" Technical report (forthcoming): ISCO codes 25 and 35, plus ICT graduates in certain adjacent ISCO codes.

[4] 75/100 in the Pre-filled Forms indicator (measuring the extent to which data that is already known to the public administration is pre-filled in the forms that are presented to the user), and of 87/100 in the Online Service Completion indicator (measuring the extent to which the various steps in an interaction with the public administration – life event – can be performed completely online).

 

Figures from 2013

 Download the country profile for 2013 as a pdf

  Download country information for 2013 as a power point presentation

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Last updated on 27/04/2015