CEF eArchiving: New dates and topics for 2020 webinar series announced


The European Commission is happy to announce the dates, topics of the next wave of Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) eArchiving webinars.

In the first half of 2020, the CEF eArchiving webinar series provided insightful, comprehensive and interactive sessions where stakeholders discussed various aspects of secure, long-term data preservation with experts in the field. This upcoming series offers the same experience for those interested in data base archiving, information package validation and the E-ARK web user interface guide.

Participants will also learn about the CEF eArchiving Building Block more generally. This Building Block provides specifications, reference software, training and service desk support for digital archiving and preservation.

In Q3 and 4 2020, you have the chance to learn about and discuss the following topics:


Webinar #6: DBPTK – an eArchiving solution for database archiving - 24 September 2020

  • Awareness of the issues when preserving databases and overarching information systems
  • Discover the different preservation strategies that apply to databases and the pros and cons of each
  • Learn about the migration to the SIARD standard for relational database archiving
  • Acquaint yourself with the DBPTK set of tools, including their features and uses
  • Find out about database preservation case studies
  • Understand how to apply the tools to their own use cases



Webinar #7: Introduction to compliance and validation - 29 October 2020

  • Learn about the role that E-ARK information package validation plays in the digital archiving life-cycle
  • Understand the E-ARK three-stage validation process for information packages
  • Discover the capabilities of E-ARK validation software
  • Follow along a guided tour of the E-ARK online validation demonstrator
  • Learn how to use the online validator to discover and fix issues in information packages
  • Learn how to use the E-ARK validation tools on your organisation



Webinar #8: The E-ARK web user interface guide  - 26 November 2020

  • Discover the implementation of E-ARK standards in E-ARK Web (CSIP, SIP and AIP)
  • Find out the purpose and use of metadata included in E-ARK information packages (METS, PREMIS and EAD)
  • Learn about the main features of the E-ARK Web reference implementation
  • Become acquainted with other advanced topics including:
    • Architecture for scalable information package processing
    • Incremental archiving (delta-AIPs)

Grant funding

The Commission is also providing €1 million in CEF grant funding. This funding is available to co-fund projects deploying the CEF eArchiving building block. This funding will focus on domains that need digital preservation services and tools other than national archives, such as digital libraries, justice, finance, environment etc. It will also aim to stimulate the integration of eArchiving tools and services with other CEF building blocks and other digital service infrastructures that can benefit from them.







CEF eInvoicing Open Session Q&A Published

The European Commission has published written Questions and Answers from the recent Open Session on electronic invoicing (eInvoicing).

On 9 June 2020, experts and policy officers from the Commission were joined by eInvoicing policy officers, technical experts and others to discuss the future of eInvoicing in Europe.

Interested parties are still welcome to provide, comments, ideas and discussion directly on the CEF eInvoicing User Community.

In addition, click below and scroll down to the downloadable Q&A document, which includes answers to questions posed during the live session, but could not be answered during the session itself. (Please note that all statements respect the opinions of the author and not the European Commission).


The European standard on eInvoicing means easier cross-border procurement – and economic activity more widely – within Europe’s internal market. Beyond making cross-border commerce easier, this standard has also proven a catalyst for digital innovation, especially in the public sector. Working at a semantic and syntactical level, the European standard on eInvoicing is a significant step in Europe’s journey towards a Digital Single Market.

Since the passing of the standard's legal adoption deadlines – 18 April 2019 for the central and 18 April 2020 for sub-central authorities – the European Commission is working intensively with stakeholders from national authorities and private entities, to define the future of eInvoicing and its wider implications for the economy.

Via the eInvoicing User Community, hosted on the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) Digital platform, the Commission received 44 contributions from nine countries (from the public and private sectors) as part of a wider online discussion. This concluded on 9 June 2020, when the Commission organised the first eInvoicing Open Session.

The European Commission will organise another Open Session to build on the key questions, observations and takeaways in the second half of 2020. Sign up to the CEF Bulletin to keep informed of upcoming news and events.




Once Only Principle Project Web Conference 23 September 2020


On 23 September 2020, The Once Only Principle (TOOP) team will present the project achievements in piloting the once-only principle and lessons learned. This conference will also focus on the handover of the TOOP project solutions to the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) Preparatory Action.

The conference is free of charge but requires a registration in advance.

For more information on the event, please sign up to the CEF Building Block Bulletin.

The Once Only Principle

Currently, the Once Only Principle (OOP) is undergoing a preparatory action within CEF. The various work packages will define if this should be considered as a Building Block or as a service of an existing Building Block.

The Once Only Principle entails that citizens and businesses provide diverse data only once in contact with public administrations, while public administration bodies take actions to internally share and reuse these data – even across borders – always in respect of data protection regulations and other constraints. The Connecting Europe Facility’s digital programme supports the application of this principle.


CEF eTranslation Platform - User Needs Assessment Survey


The European Commission has launched an eTranslation User Survey eTranslation Survey to find out how satisfied eTranslation users are with the current offering and which functionalities they are missing.

The Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) eTranslation Building Block provides a machine translation system that is aware of the correct terminology and style for different contexts;

  • Draws upon decades worth of work by EU translators (over 1 billion sentences in the 24 official EU languages (plus Icelandic and Norwegian) thus capable of understanding specific EU policy and legal terminology).
  • Designed to retain the format of structured documents during translation.
  • Can translate multiple documents to multiple languages at once.

It also allows for easy access to the machine translation service for both people and machines and guarantees continuous service of high quality, with due consideration for the confidentiality and security of data during the translation process.

You can use eTranslation as a stand-alone translation service (for government officials in public administrations in the EU) or integrated into any public sector website, from local administrations to pan-EU projects.


The city of Florence uses CEF Big Data tool to understand COVID-19 impact

In the wake of Italy’s emergency response to the COVID-19 pandemic, cities like Florence start to look towards recovery, with a focus on returning to normality while avoiding relapse.

In particular, Florence wants to leverage on data collected by Smart City Control Room (SCCR) - as a key part and enabler of a bigger project called REPLICATE - to ensure lockdown measures are lifted in a responsible and controlled manner. Analysing big datasets on citizens' movements, business locations and events sales can inform policy and ultimately determine how key activities for the region like tourism can re-open safely. 

How does BDTI help?

The Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) Big Data Test Infrastructure (BDTI) Building Block provides a ready-to-use virtual environment that helps public administrations and projects led by the public sector improve the experience of the citizens, make government more efficient and boost business and the wider economy through big data.

Florence's ongoing REPLICATE project, thanks to the Smart City Control Room innovative and intelligent city management system, aims to improve policymaking using big data collected before, during and beyond the pandemic. The city has now decided to use the data analysis capabilities of the Big Data Test Infrastructure to get the most out of this data. BDTI will provide an easy-to-use, scalable solution for analysing data aggregated from various sources:

  • Public wifi sensors (location, number of users connected)
  • Traffic sensors
  • Pollution sensors
  • Tickets sold to museums/events
  • City assets data map (location of parks, gardens, shopping centres)

The pilot project integrating BDTI with Florence’s SCCR will carry out predictive, descriptive and time-series analysis, mitigating the risks of easing lockdown measures by helping avoid overcrowding and identifying high-risk spaces in the city.

Once relevant insights are collected through BDTI, Florence ultimately intends to scale up the REPLICATE project to include other municipalities in Tuscany. This is with thanks to ongoing collaboration with Tuscany Region, and the University of Florence. The data, tools and results from this project could be shared with future pilots, as cities go smart with data tools like BDTI in an effort to curb the effects of coronavirus through innovation and collaboration.

Public administrations interested in becoming smart cities and knowledge-sharing with municipalities like Florence can become part of the BDTI Community by contacting the CEF BDTI team (CEF-BDTI-SUPPORT@ec.europa.eu). 


The Connecting Europe Facility provides free, reusable digital solutions in the fight against COVID-19

CEF’s free, reusable digital solutions are helping public administrations in Europe fight the virus. BDTI is also being used in Valencia to analyse vast amounts of data on COVID-19 to provide insights to clinicians and hospital managers. In addition, various regional authorities in Italy are using the CEF Context Broker to turn widely collected data into contact tracing, contagion maps and predictive analyses.

Find out how our digital solutions can help organisations during and beyond the pandemic on our dedicated COVID-19 page.

CEF eArchiving: "RODA – an end-to-end solution for digital preservation" slides, recording, Q&A published


On 25 June 2020, the European Commission organised a live Webinar, followed by an interactive Q&A session, to introduce an end to end solution for digital preservation. 

In the fifth of the CEF eArchiving Building Block’s training webinars, Hélder Silva introduced RODA – an end-to-end solution for digital preservation. This webinar allowed participants to:

  • Learn about what software is available and its relationship with OAIS/eArchiving;
  • Discover the purpose of each piece of software and how it works;
  • Find out where detailed information about the software can be found, and where it can be downloaded; and
  • Become acquainted with different use cases and understand how RODA can help institutions deal with them.

The CEF eArchiving Building Block provides specifications, reference software, training and service desk support for digital archiving, including digital preservation. In order to help users benefit from the features of the Building Block, CEF is running a series of training Webinars that will cover its core functionality and other relevant CEF eArchiving content. 

Upcoming webinars

This webinar looking at ESSArch was one in a in a series of webinars looking at the CEF eArchiving Building Block. You can already view the recording of our preservation of digital geospatial records webinar.

Below is the tentative calendar for the next instalments:


TitleHighlightsDate

Webinar #6: DBPTK – an eArchiving solution for database archiving

  • Become aware of the issues when preserving databases and overarching information systems

  • Discover the different preservation strategies that apply to databases and the pros and cons of each

  • Learn about the migration to the SIARD standard for relational database archiving

  • Become acquainted with the DBPTK set of tools, including their features and uses

  • Find out about database preservation case studies

  • Understand how to apply the tools to their own use cases

24 September 2020:

10:00 - 11:15

Webinar #7: Introduction to compliance and validation

  • Learn about the role that E-ARK information package validation plays in the digital archiving life-cycle

  • Understand the E-ARK three-stage validation process for information packages

  • Discover the capabilities of E-ARK validation software

  • Follow along a guided tour of the E-ARK online validation demonstrator

  • Learn how to use the online validator to discover and fix issues in information packages

  • Learn how to use the E-ARK validation tools on your organisation

29th October 2020:

Webinar #8: The e-Ark web user interface guide 

  • Discover the implementation of E-ARK standards in E-ARK Web (CSIP, SIP and AIP)

  • Find out the purpose and use of metadata included in E-ARK information packages (METS, PREMIS and EAD)

  • Learn about the main features of the E-ARK Web reference implementation

  • Become acquainted with other advanced topics including:

    • Architecture for scalable information package processing

    • Incremental archiving (delta-AIPs)

  • 26th November 2020:

About the CEF building blocks

The CEF Building Blocks provide basic services which can be reused to enable more complex digital public services offered to citizens, businesses and public administration. They provide reusable tools and services helping to underpin the Digital Single Market, that aims to remove digital barriers.

The CEF Digital Portal is the home of the CEF building blocks (Big Data Test Infrastructure, Blockchain, Context Broker, eArchivingeIDeDeliveryeInvoicingeSignatureeTranslation and Once Only Principle). It is the one-stop-shop for information about the building blocks.



European Blockchain Services Infrastructure v1 -  documentation published

The European Commission is happy to publish the documentation accompanying the first version of the European Blockchain Services Infrastructure (EBSI).

The EBSI will consist of a network of distributed nodes across Europe – the blockchain infrastructure – leveraging an increasing number of applications focused on specific use cases.

This documentation is for public administrations that needs to host an EBSI node or to start a pilot project integrating applications to the EBSI using specific APIs. This documentation covers a variety of topics, including the EBSI's architecture and governance, current use cases, technical documentation as well as legal and socio-economic reports.

As a critical cross-border infrastructure, the EBSI is a CEF Building Block, providing reusable software, specifications, and services to support the adoption by public administrations, businesses and citizens. The EBSI allows public administrations in Europe the potential to revolutionise the way that citizens, governments and businesses interact, by enhancing trust between entities and improving the efficiency of operations.





How CEF eSignature can transform the health sector

Many sectors have been affected by the coronavirus pandemic, none more so, nor more directly, than healthcare. We are already seeing organisations in many areas, such as universities, businesses and public administrations that leverage digital technology to adapt to this unprecedented crisis, from adopting remote working practices to using big data to inform lockdown policy.

The Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) eSignature building block is one solution that can support healthcare service providers in accelerating their digital transformation by increasing interoperability in the sector across Europe. eSignature helps public administrations, businesses and citizens to create and verify electronic signatures and seals remotely from anywhere in Europe, at any time. 

By replacing traditional, handwritten signatures with electronic signatures that are recognised across all Member States, hospitals and other healthcare establishments can combat the coronavirus directly by minimising unnecessary contact, while still instilling a high level of trust. Furthermore, electronic signatures can improve healthcare establishments' overall efficiency, meaning they can facilitate timely, trustworthy health care services provided to citizens both during and beyond the pandemic.


Find out how other CEF building blocks are helping fight coronavirus here.

What has eSignature to offer? 


Trust, transparency and security

When it comes to the highly sensitive personal data at stake in healthcare, security and trust are vital. The eSignature building block empowers organisations to build electronic signature solutions in full compliance with the eIDAS Regulation. This means that as traditional paper-based processes become digital, the utmost degree of security is guaranteed for patients' personal information, creating a healthcare system that citizens can trust


Potential applications

Electronic signatures have numerous applications in healthcare, from patients being able to remotely sign consent forms to secure, efficient transactions between healthcare establishments and insurance companies. 

Here are just some use-cases where remotely signing documents with eSignature can make patient-institution interactions more seamless, while minimising unnecessary contact

  • patient admissions into hospitals; 
  • electronic medicine prescriptions and dispensations;
  • hospital discharge letters;
  • medical leave certificates; 
  • organ donation consents.

In addition to this, eSignature brings the added benefit of legal and technical interoperability across borders. For example, an electronic medical record signed using eSignature in somebody's country of origin is recognised as legally valid in other Member States. If you have a specific medical condition, healthcare providers in a different country can access a secure, verifiable record of this condition and adjust their treatment accordingly. A record of treatments undergone in this country can then be electronically signed and shared with medical practitioners from your country of origin, making your healthcare experience as easy and seamless as possible. 

eSignature can also play a key role in a wider effort to digitalise the health sector, through a number of applications. For example:

  • hospital purchases of medical equipment and medicine; 
  • hospital contracting; 
  • processing transactions between hospitals and patients' health insurance providers; 
  • medical professionals updating or renewing their credentials. 

This makes eSignature a solution that can bring both short- and long-term benefits to the health sector, helping create a secure, efficient and seamless healthcare system both during and beyond the pandemic.


How does eSignature work?

eSignature helps implement your own digital signature solution by providing the following services and resources:

  • The DSS Open-Source library: a library of software and technical specifications for building a conformant, interoperable eSignature solution;

  • A browser of Trusted Lists containing trusted providers of e-signature and e-seal certificates and a Trusted Lists Manager, that enables the creation, editing and maintenance of Trusted Lists in a standard, machine-readable format. 
  • E-Signature validation tests to ensure your solution is eIDAS-compliant.

eSignature has the potential to transform the way we provide healthcare, vastly increasing user-friendliness from service providers to end-users in a fast, verified and secure way.



The Building Blocks in the fight against COVID-19

CEF’s free, reusable digital solutions are helping public administrations all over Europe fight the virus. The Big Data Test Infrastructure (BDTI) building block is being used in Valencia to analyse vast amounts of data on COVID-19 to provide insights to clinicians and hospital managers. In addition, various regional authorities in Italy are using the CEF Context Broker to turn widely collected data into contact tracing, contagion maps and predictive analyses.

Find out how our digital solutions are helping organisations during and beyond the pandemic on our dedicated COVID-19 page.





Digital identity and trust: Commission launches public consultation on the eIDAS Regulation

The European Commission has launched a public consultation on the revision of the rules on electronic identification and trust services for electronic transactions in the internal market, the eIDAS Regulation. 

The evaluation will take into account the latest technological and policy developments, such as the increased reliance on doing business online.

The public consultation will be open until 2 October 2020, aiming to collect views from a broad range of stakeholders and citizens in order to evaluate the existing regulation. In parallel, targeted consultations with selected groups of stakeholders will be conducted. They will gather data and evidence on the impacts of specific elements of the possible revision.


The eIDAS Regulation, fully in force since 2018, is the first and most advanced cross-border legal framework for cross-border electronic identification, authentication and website certification within the EU. Since February, EU citizens and companies in eight EU Member States can use their national eID across the EU and as of next year, 55% of EU population will be covered.

The Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) eID, eSignature and eDelivery Building Blocks help implement the provisions of this regulation in the form of free, open standards-based reusable solutions. Have a look and see how you can benefit from using one or more of these Building Blocks.



Norwegian Digitalisation Agency uses Commission's Big Data tool to optimise public procurement

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Digdir, the Norwegian Digitalisation Agency, is using the Connecting Europe Facility's (CEF) big data tool, the Big Data Test Infrastructure (BDTI), to help optimise public procurement in Norway.

Digdir has been helping Norwegian public administrations in their digital transformation for six years. They have already implemented a PEPPOL network, based on the eDelivery and eInvoicing building blocks, to digitalise invoicing in public procurement. This network allows public and private organisations to seamlessly exchange and automatically process digital invoices.  

Now, Digdir is looking to help improve digital public procurement, or eProcurement, even further by gathering and analysing big datasets on transactions in this area.

How does the Big Data Test Infrastructure (BDTI) help?

The Big Data Test Infrastructure (BDTI) Building Block helps public administrations and projects led by the public sector improve the citizen experience, increase government efficiency and boost business through big data.

Since February 2019, the BDTI team and Digdir have been working together on a pilot project to analyse procurement data, in particular related to transactions. The ready-to-use virtual environment and analytical capabilities of BDTI helps to gather and analyse relevant transactional data and present it to certain private businesses and public organisations. These stakeholders can then use the data aggregated by BDTI to gain key insights, identifying process bottlenecks and optimising their own practices and interactions with other organisations in the value chain. Some of this data will also be made publicly available.

Moving forward

Within the context of this BDTI pilot, Digdir hopes to make transactional data publicly available in 2021. They are also considering using the European Blockchain Services Infrastructure (EBSI) building block in the future which, alongside eDelivery, eInvoicing and BDTI, would be the fourth building block used by Digdir. 

The data, tools and results from this BDTI project could be shared with future pilots. While already engaged in using the eDelivery and eInvoicing building blocks, this pilot demonstrates the value of BDTI in the context of a wider strategic project. Its ready-to-use virtual environment allows agencies like Digdir, which is committed to maximising the benefits of digitalisation for Norwegian public administrations, to experiment with new ideas and share their insights with others, in a collective effort to make the Digital Single Market a reality. 



ISO approves AS4 as an International Standard

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The ISO (International Organisation for Standardization) approved ebMS3 (ebXML Messaging version 3.0) and AS4 (Applicability Statement 4) as International Standards. 

AS4 is the message exchange protocol promoted by the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) eDelivery Building Block. This approval represents an opportunity to increase confidence in eDelivery and can potentially lead to the scale-up of AS4 adoption by projects across the EU and beyond. This decision was made at Technical Committee level, specifically within TC 154 on "Processes, data elements and documents in commerce, industry and administration". The standards will become the new part 1 and part 2 of the ISO 15000. The ISO standards are recognised in legislation within Europe and internationally, and are known and trusted by public administrations, IT experts and business stakeholders outside the IT domain.

AS4 is a Conformance Profile of the OASIS ebMS 3.0 specification. AS4 is typically used for the secure and reliable exchange of documents, attachments to these documents and data in general, and can be used in Business-to-Business (B2B), Business-to-Administration (B2A) and Administration-to-Administration (A2A) exchange contexts in every sector or business domain. AS4 condenses in a single specification a series of well-known web-services specifications, such as WS-Security and SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) with attachments. AS4 both provides evidence relating to the handling of the transmitted data as well as protecting it against the risk of loss, theft, damage or any unauthorised alterations.

In 2015, AS4 was chosen by the EU Member States, participating in the eSENS Large Scale Pilot, as the primary protocol for B2B, B2A and A2A message exchange going forward. The approval of AS4 as an international standard means that AS4 is now recognised as a standard and not only as a technical specification. Additionally, ETSI (European Telecommunications Standards Institute) worked on the AS4 binding to eIDAS ERDS (Electronic Registered Delivery Service) - see part 4 of the message delivery binding here

About CEF eDelivery

The CEF eDelivery building block proposes the use of the AS4 messaging protocol to create a secure channel for the transmission of documents and data by electronic means, over the internet or via a private network. Projects use eDelivery to exchange documents and data in a secure way among many participants (within Europe and beyond). CEF eDelivery offers a set of services to support EU-wide projects to implement eDelivery.  

There are currently more than 30 large and small projects involving both the public and private sector (G2G, G2B and B2B) reusing eDelivery (check the monitoring dashboard for more details). Read the CEF eDelivery success stories to learn more about the cross-border projects that are using eDelivery in different domains. On CEF Digital you will find a list of several vendors that offer solutions fully compliant with the AS4 profile of eDelivery. If you are interested in adding your solution to this list, have a look at our conformance testing service








European Commission’s machine translation tool to use eDelivery

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The Commission’s Directorate-General for Translation (DGT) has decided to use the CEF eDelivery building block to provide a highly secure means of using their machine translation tool.

DGT's machine translation tool - CEF eTranslation - performs state-of-the-art machine translation to and from any official EU language. It is freely available to public administration employees and all European SMEs. 

The Commission has been working continuously to improve this service, adding Russian and Mandarin to its available languages, and including domain-specific translation engines that are particularly suited to translating certain styles of text (legal, health-related, etc.).

Now, DGT is looking to improve its service further by adding an optional layer of extra security for those accessing eTranslation.

How does eDelivery help?

The eDelivery building block provides the technical specifications and standards needed to build a secure, interoperable and reliable communication channel or network using AS4 Access Points.

DGT has chosen to use eDelivery in their eTranslation tool through EU Send, its associated Managed Service provided by the Directorate-General for Informatics, DIGIT. This allows for the secure, reliable exchange of data between the machine translation platform and other systems. By using eDelivery for secure data exchange, eTranslation can now enjoy the following benefits:

  • Additional security and confidentiality for the data translated;
  • Automatically encrypted messages;
  • Automatic recovery of information if the transmission is interrupted;
  • eDelivery AS4 Access Points are fully interoperable, allowing eTranslation to be seamlessly integrated with other systems.

If you need to exchange documents and data reliably, securely and seamlessly, use the eDelivery building block to build your solution.


The building blocks

DGT’s decision to use eDelivery as a Managed Service in its machine translation tool shows how powerful the CEF building blocks can be when used in combination to develop a digital system.

The INEA 2020-2 open call for eArchiving is making €1 million available to projects looking to adopt solutions and standards from the CEF eArchiving building block in their digital archive(s). This call encourages proposals promoting synergy between eArchiving and other building blocks, such as CEF eDelivery.

Visit the INEA website to find out more about funding opportunities. You can find useful tips for writing a strong proposal by looking at the recording and presentations from the 2020-2 CEF Telecom Virtual Info Day

Recording of 2020-2 CEF Telecom Virtual Info Day available

On Thursday 16 July 2020, the Innovation and Networks Executive Agency (INEA) held a Virtual Info Day on the second 2020 CEF Telecom call, which includes grant funding for projects using CEF eArchiving and Public Open Data.

Over 650 people registered to take part in the Virtual Info Day. The event covered the eight priorities of the call and advice on how to submit a strong proposal for grant funding. You can find presentations and a recording of the event on INEA’s website.



This call makes €1 million in CEF grant funding is available to co-fund projects deploying the CEF eArchiving building block. eArchiving provides technical standards and specifications for preserving, migrating and reusing data securely, while ensuring data integrity and interoperability with other systems.



In addition, the Public Open Data call makes €3 million available in grant funding to projects looking to generate, make accessible and reuse public sector information in a way that creates direct and indirect benefits for EU citizens, businesses and public administrations. Projects looking to generate, disseminate and/or reuse open-access public data are strongly encouraged to do so using existing APIs, such as the CEF Context Broker building block. Context Broker is an API funded by the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) that gathers data from various sources for visualisation and analysis in real-time. 



Commission runs a pilot project on Qualified Web Authentication Certificates (QWACs)


The Regulation (EU) No 910/2014 on electronic identification and trust services for electronic transactions in the internal market (eIDAS Regulation) created Qualified Web Authentication Certificates (QWACs) (art. 38).

QWACs authenticate websites by providing trusted information about the identity of persons or legal entities behind a website and thus contribute to creating trust online and to ensuring safety and security of the internet for consumers.

Since December 2018, the European Commission has been discussing with web browsers how to stimulate the uptake of QWACs. In this context, web browsers suggested a technical implementation that decouples QWACs into an attribute certificate and a base certificate, which are cryptographically linked.

To test its feasibility, the Commission runs a pilot project aligned with the requirements of the eIDAS Regulation. This ntQWACs project demonstrates the technical viability of the tested solution, regardless of the web browser used, and the many opportunities and added value that QWACs may bring to end users.

Moving forwards, the Commission will take stock of the implementation of QWACs in the context of revision of the eIDAS Regulation, envisaged for Q4 2020.

Should you need more information about this pilot project, please see the presentation, including a demo of ntQWACs.



Register for the 2020-2 CEF Telecom Virtual Info Day on 16 July


On Thursday 16 July 2020, the Innovation and Networks Executive Agency (INEA) is organising a virtual info day from 09:30 to 14:10 outlining the eight priorities of the second 2020 CEF Telecom call, including CEF eArchiving and Public Open Data.

This call makes €1 million in CEF grant funding is available to co-fund projects deploying the CEF eArchiving building block. eArchiving provides technical standards and specifications for preserving, migrating and reusing data securely, while ensuring data integrity and interoperability with other systems.

This funding will focus on domains that need digital preservation services and tools other than national archives, such as digital libraries, justice, finance, environment etc. It will also aim to stimulate the integration of eArchiving tools and services with other CEF building blocks and other digital service infrastructures that can benefit from them.

In addition, the Public Open Data call makes €3 million available in grant funding to projects looking to generate, make accessible and reuse public sector information in a way that creates direct and indirect benefits for EU citizens, businesses and public administrations. Projects looking to generate, disseminate and/or reuse open-access public data are strongly encouraged to do so using existing APIs, such as the CEF Context Broker building block. Context Broker is an API funded by the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) that gathers data from various sources for visualisation and analysis in real-time. 

The event will explain the policy context of the calls. It will also give information about the evaluation process and will provide valuable tips & tricks on writing a good proposal.

You can submit your questions in advance by email in advance to INEA-CEF-Telecoms-Infoday@ec.europa.eu. During the event it will also be possible to send questions on Slido using the hashtag #CEFTelecomDay.