Together Against Trafficking in Human Beings

United Nations

United Nations

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The Forced Labour Convention (C29)

Adopted on 28 June 1930 and entered into force on 1 May 1932

The Convention was the first international instrument which required the suppression of enforced labour in all its forms. The Forced Labour Convention paved the way for the 1956 Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery.

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The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)

The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) adopted by the UN General Assembly on 18 December 1979, is often described as an international bill of rights for women. It entered into force as an international treaty on 3 September 1981 after the twentieth country had ratified it.

The Convention

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The Forced Labour Convention (C29)

Adopted on 28 June 1930 and entered into force on 1 May 1932

The Convention was the first international instrument which required the suppression of enforced labour in all its forms. The Forced Labour Convention paved the way for the 1956 Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery.

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The Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour

The Convention, known as the Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, was adopted by the International Labour Organization (ILO) on 17 June 1999, as ILO Convention No 182. Thus, 19 November 2000 emerges as its date of coming into force, since the Convention itself provides that it would come into force 12 months after the date of the second ratification.

Child prostitution and the sale of children come under the definition of "the worst forms of child labour". All states parties to the convention are committed to the immediate elimination of these extreme forms of child labour.

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1926 Slavery Convention

The Convention to Suppress the Slave Trade and Slavery known as the Slavery Convention, signed on September 25, 1926 and entered in to force on 7 March 1927.

This convention was created under the auspices of the League of Nations and serves as the foundation for the prevention and suppression of the slave trade. With the 1926 Slavery Convention, concrete rules and articles were decided upon, and slavery and slave trade were banned.  The definition of slavery is further refined and extended by the 1956 Supplementary Convention.

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Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography

Adopted and opened for signature, ratification and accession by General Assembly resolution A/RES/54/263 of 25 May 2000. It entered into force on 18 January 2002.

The  Optional Protocol on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography supplements the Convention on the rights of the Child by providing States with detailed requirements to end the sexual exploitation and abuse of children.  It also protects children from being sold for non-sexual purposes such as forced labour, illegal adoption and organ donation.

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