Together Against Trafficking in Human Beings

Sweden

Sweden

1. GENERAL INFORMATION- SITUATION ON TRAFFICKING IN HUMAN BEINGS

Sweden is mainly a country of destination for victims of sexual exploitation, forced labour, forced criminality and forced begging. Until recently trafficking for sexual exploitation has been the main identified form of trafficking in Sweden. Since 2010 a number of reports of suspected cases of labour trafficking have been rising and also a growing number of cases of trafficking for forced begging and forced criminality have been identified.

In 2015, Sweden registered over 162 000 asylum applicants, and almost half (approximately 70 000) were under 18, including 35 000 unaccompanied minors. This mass influx of asylum seekers has contributed to the on-going debate on the issue of vulnerability of migrants, especially women and children, to human trafficking and in particularly to sexual exploitation and begging. Other worrying scenarios include situations when newly-arrived migrants, among them unaccompanied children, being in a desperate situation need for money to pay back debts to human smugglers, would also end up exploited for work or other purposes.

Child trafficking has received more focus in Sweden recently and children on the move have been deemed as increasingly vulnerable to trafficking and exploitation in a study on child trafficking in Sweden. Majority of child victims come from Africa and Afghanistan. Most have applied for asylum, but some are completely outside of official systems in place. Most commonly identified form of trafficking among children is sexual exploitation, but many are also exploited for forced labour, criminality or begging.

A worrying trend concerning disappearances of migrant children has been detected in Sweden. There is evidence of over 1500 unaccompanied migrant children going missing in Sweden in 2013-2016.

In 2016 the Swedish Migration Agency conducted a minor study among children seeking asylum in 2013-2015 and identified 132 children (97 % girls) who said that they were married. The phenomenon has been linked to forced marriages. Majority of the children identified in the study were between 16 and 17 years of age. They were mainly from Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq and had applied for international protection in Sweden after 1st of August 2015. The report found that there were no standardized procedures to deal with such cases, and no specific training for staff and administrators to deal with children who are married.

A new assessment report on child trafficking reviewed 68 cases which were reported to the Swedish police between 2015 and the mid-year 2016. While the preliminary investigation had begun in a majority of the cases (84 percent), prosecution had been initiated in only one case. The analysed material included about 75 children of which 60 percent were girls and 37 percent boys. The majority of referrals were made by representatives of authorities, mainly the Migration Agency and Social Services (60 percent) and the police (17 percent). The assessment identified several problems and major challenges related to the investigations and recommended more specialization among police and prosecution authorities when it comes to human trafficking and children as victims. Thus it is likely that the extent of child trafficking in Sweden is bigger than showed by the criminal statistics. Many potential cases might not come to the attention of the authorities in the first place.

A recent government inquiry into human trafficking criminalization has further more expressed concern over the fact that so few trafficking investigations in general lead to convictions in Sweden and suggests a number of legislative changes to improve the situation. Out of the 522 reports concerning human trafficking registered by the Swedish Police Authority in the period 2011–2015, only 366 suspicions of offences concerning human trafficking were registered by the Swedish Prosecution Authority in the same period. Only ten per cent of these cases led to prosecution proceedings and judgments (acquittals or convictions for human trafficking or other offences). In fact, during this time period, only twelve judgments were issued that had involved an examination of human trafficking and the crime had been proved in any respect in just half of these cases.

In 2016 Sweden established a National Referral Mechanism to improve referral as well as increase the protection and assistance of victims of trafficking. The NRM is based on a manual which outlines the responsibilities of each authority regarding the referral of victims of trafficking, including children. The Regional Coordinators function as regional focal points and first point of contact for operative support in cases of trafficking. The manual is divided into five steps, aimed to help professionals and NGOs after they have identified a potential victim of trafficking. Assistance to victims is provided directly by the municipalities. In addition, NGOs can assist victims in cooperation with municipalities, or directly and via the Support Programme described below.

In 2015, the County Administrative Board of Stockholm and the Civil Society Platform initiated a pilot national support programme (NSP) for victims of trafficking as a part of a governmental assignment. The programme runs parallel to the support measures offered under the National Referral Mechanism and the Return Programme. The NSP aims to provide an improved and additional support for victims of trafficking who cannot access the NRM and address the needs of persons who fall in the gaps of the official system or who do not want to contact the authorities or return to their home country. The NSP makes it possible to offer a maximum of 30 days of services to a person while they make the decision of whether or not to contact the authorities. Thus this way an informal identification as potential VoT is possible. Moreover up to 90 days of services are available to persons who choose not to return to their home country with the goal giving them a better chance to live independently in Sweden. However NSP has very limited resources and the funding for 2018 has been further uncertain as the National Coordination Function has been transferred to the new Authority for Gender Equality and is not providing funding for the programme. Still NSP is seen and function as an important link between potential VoT outside the system and the assistance provided through the legal system, and there are efforts made to find solutions for the continuation of NSP.

In the recent years, human trafficking phenomenon has diversified in Sweden and a growing number of potential victims of trafficking have been identified among their clientele especially by the Swedish Migration Agency who identified a total of 341 potential victims including 91 minors in 2016. The National Coordinator’s office identified 150 potential victims in 2016, 50 of them children. Also the number of victims who have been in contact with NGOs also increased sharply in 2016, almost doubling from 36 victims in 2015 to 70 victims in 2016 (Swedish Civil Society Platform, 2017). The increase can be somewhat connected to the extremely large migration flow into Sweden in 2015 resulting in over 162 000 asylum applications, among them over 35 000 unaccompanied minors. However, it might also be the result of increasing awareness on human trafficking and its different forms among Swedish actors.

2. INSTITUTIONAL, LEGAL AND POLICY FRAMEWORK TO ADDRESS TRAFFICKING IN HUMAN BEINGS

Institutional framework

The Swedish Police Authority appointed National Rapporteur

In 1998, as the first in Europe, a National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings (The National Police Board) was appointed by the Government, following the recommendations in The Hague Ministerial Declaration of April 1997.[1]

The appropriation decision for the 2018 budget year stated that the Police Authority shall continue to act as the national rapporteur on matters concerning trafficking in human beings (Government bill 2010/11:77).[2] The national rapporteur’s mission includes gathering information about the scope of trafficking in human beings to, within and through Sweden; analysing the situation, giving recommendations about how trafficking can be prevented and combated, and also reporting annually on these results to the Government.[3]

The Gender Equality Agency appointed National coordinator

In 2017, the Government announced the intention to establish a special public authority for gender equality, with the overarching objective to “contribute to the strategic, coherent and long-term governance and effective implementation of the national gender equality policies and strategies.”[4]

The Gender Equality Agency, which is placed in Gothenburg, opened its doors on 1 January 2018.[5]

The mandate of the Gender Equality Agency includes the responsibility to analyze, follow-up, coordinate, produce knowledge and give support in order to implement the national gender equality policy objectives as set out in the National Strategy on Gender Equality.[6]

Importantly, to enhance efficiency and coordination long-term, and to counteract fragmentation, the responsibility for the coordination of the work to prevent and eliminate prostitution and trafficking in human beings for sexual purposes, and the national Victim Voluntary Return Project for victims of all forms of human trafficking (see below),

previously held by the County Administration Board of Stockholm, has been transferred to the Gender Equality Agency.[7]

Legal framework

Trafficking in human beings

 Chapter 4, § 1 a of the Swedish Penal Code (2010:371)

A person who, in cases other than those stated in §1, by means of unlawful coercion, deceit, exploitation of a person’s vulnerable situation or by any other such improper means, recruits, transports, transfers, houses or receives another person, and in so doing takes control of that person in order for the person to be exploited for sexual purposes, removal of organs, active military service, forced work or for some other purpose in a situation involving distress for the victim, shall be sentenced to imprisonment for trafficking in human beings for a period of a minimum of two and a maximum of ten years.

Anyone who commits a crime as referred to in para. 1 against a person who has not yet reached the age of 18 shall be sentenced for trafficking in human beings even if such improper means as stated therein have not been used.

If the crime as referred to in paras. 1 or 2 is of a less grievous nature, the perpetrator shall be sentenced to a term of imprisonment of a maximum of four years.

Trafficking in human beings is, by its nature, a crime against the person and it is dealt with in Ch. 4, the Swedish Penal Code, on crimes against liberty and peace. Criminal liability applies to anyone who, by means of unlawful coercion, deceit, exploitation of a person’s vulnerable situation or any other such improper means, recruits, transports, transfers, accommodates or receives another person, in order for the person to be exploited for sexual purposes, removal of organs, active military service, forced labour or some other purpose in a situation involving distress for the victim. In cases where the victim is under 18, the perpetrator will be convicted of trafficking in human beings even if no improper means have been used in order to carry out the crime. Common to the circumstances mentioned in the provision is that they, in various ways, intend to control the victim’s free and true will, regardless of the intended exploitation.

Procuring/aggravated procuring

Chapter 6, § 12 of the Swedish Penal Code (2004:406)

Anyone who encourages or improperly economically exploits a person having casual sexual relations in return for payment is sentenced for procuring to a term of imprisonment of at most four years.

If a person who has leased an apartment with a right of usage becomes aware that the apartment is being used entirely or to a significant degree for casual sexual relations in return for payment and does not do what may reasonably be expected in order to bring an end to the lease, and if this activity continues or is resumed in the apartment, then he or she shall be regarded as having promoted the activity and shall be sentenced for culpability in compliance with para. 1.

If a crime as referred to in para. 1 or 2 is regarded as grievous, then the perpetrator shall be convicted of aggravated procuring and sentenced to a term of imprisonment of a minimum of two and a maximum of eight years. When considering whether or not the crime is grievous, special attention shall be paid to whether the activity was conducted on a large scale, entailed significant financial gain or involved the ruthless exploitation of another person.

Culpability for procuring rests with the person who promotes or exploits the fact that another person has more than one casual sexual relationship in return for payment. The act of procuring may be considered to be aggravated if the crime relates to an activity that was carried out on a fairly large scale, has resulted in considerable gain or involved ruthless exploitation. A crime of procuring may also be considered to be aggravated if it involves aspects of trafficking in human beings and the transportation of girls and women to Sweden from other countries for the purposes of prostitution.

The maximum punishment for aggravated procuring has been increased to a term of between six and eight years. This was done to make it possible, for example, for the people who plan and organise procuring in the nature of trafficking in human beings to be punished, but where it has been impossible to prove the requirement of undue influence.

Purchases of sexual services

Chapter 6, § 11 of the Swedish Penal Code (2011:517)

Someone who, in a case other than as intended previously in this chapter, obtains casual sexual intercourse in return for payment, will be convicted of the purchase of a sexual service and sentenced to a fine or a custodial sentence of a maximum of one year.

What has been stated in paragraph 1 also applies even if the remuneration has been promised or given by someone else.

Purchase of a sexual act from a child

Chapter 6, § 9 of the Swedish Penal Code (2004:406)

Someone who, in a case other than as intended previously in this chapter, induces a child below the age of eighteen to carry out or endure a sexual act in return for payment will be sentenced, for the purchase of a sexual act from a child, to a fine or to a custodial sentence of a maximum of two years.

What has been stated in paragraph 1 also applies even if the remuneration has been promised or given by someone else.

The Aliens Act

In order to make it easier for perpetrators to be brought to trial, a provision granting temporary residence permits for foreign witnesses and victims was introduced into the Aliens’ Act in 2005[8] where this is considered justified, in order to carry out a preliminary investigation and main hearing in the criminal case. In 2016, the Swedish Migration Board made 60 decisions to grant temporary residence permits to such witnesses.[9] On 1 July 2007, the provision in the Aliens’ Act was amended in order to harmonise with an EU Directive on the victims of trafficking in human beings[10]. Witnesses are now required to cooperate with the criminal investigation authorities, and to break off all links with the individuals who are suspected of crimes, etc. At the request of the leader of the preliminary investigation, a residence permit for thirty days can now also be issued if the witness wants time for reflection in order to recover and to make a decision as to whether he or she wishes to cooperate with the criminal investigation authorities.

Chapter 5, § 15 of the Aliens Act (2005:716)

A temporary residence permit may be granted, at the request of the leader of the preliminary investigation, to an alien who has been living here, if this is required in order for a preliminary investigation or main hearing to be held in the criminal case. A temporary residence permit for a minimum of six months shall be given at the request of the leader of the preliminary investigation to an alien who is living here if

1. this is required in order for a preliminary investigation or main hearing to be held in the criminal case,

2. the alien in question has clearly displayed a willingness to cooperate with the criminal investigation authorities,

3. the alien has broken off all contacts with the persons who are suspected of a crime that is the subject of the preliminary investigation, and

4. considerations of public order and safety do not require that the permit should not be granted.

If the alien wishes to have some time for consideration in order to recover and to make a decision as to whether he or she wishes to cooperate with the criminal investigation authorities, then a temporary thirty-day residence permit will be issued at the request of the leader of the preliminary investigation, as long as the conditions as stated in items 1 and 4 of para. 1 have been fulfilled.

A residence permit issued in pursuance of para. 1 may be extended if so requested by the leader of the preliminary investigation and if the conditions stated therein are still fulfilled. A residence permit issued in accordance with para. 2 may be extended if so requested by the director of the preliminary investigation if, for particular reasons, there is a need for a longer period of consideration and the conditions as stated in items 1 and 4 of para. 1 are still fulfilled.

Selected policy framework

National strategy against men’s violence against women (2017-2026)

In January 2017, the Government launched a national, feminist strategy to prevent and combat men’s violence against women, combined with a comprehensive program of measures, and a focus on capacity building and collaboration between stakeholders.

The underlying presumption of the strategy is that prostitution and trafficking in human beings for sexual purposes are forms of men’s violence against women and girls, with the same root cause; systemic power differences between men and women in society.[11]

Measures directed toward the prevention and elimination of prostitution and trafficking in human beings for sexual purposes have yet to be presented.

Swedish Foreign Service action plan for a feminist foreign policy (2015-2018)

In 2015, the Swedish Government introduced an action plan for a feminist foreign policy, with six long-term objectives, including the aim to strengthen the human rights of women and girls, who are refugees or migrants, to intensify the work for sexual and reproductive rights, and to combat violence against women and girls in close relationships. The work to prevent and combat trafficking in human beings is a prioritized area.[12] As was stated by the Minister for Foreign Affairs at the launch of the Action Plan:

Equality between women and men is a fundamental aim of Swedish foreign policy. Ensuring that women and girls can enjoy their fundamental human rights is both an obligation within the framework of our international commitments, and a prerequisite for reaching Sweden’s broader foreign policy goals on peace, and security and sustainable development.[13]

National action plan on trafficking in children

In February 2014, the Government presented a communication to the Parliament with the aim to strengthen the rights of children in Sweden and integrate the best interest of the child in all measures. This document includes a large variety of measures, and an action plan for the protection of children against human trafficking and other forms of exploitation.

The action plan aims to increase the understanding by public authorities, professionals, the public, and children themselves about the risks for children to become victims of human trafficking, exploitation and sexual abuse, increase the effectiveness of protection measures, and improve the contributions of Swedish public authorities to the international cooperation for the protection of children from human trafficking, exploitation and sexual abuse.[14]

All measures were to be carried out during 2014-2015, and to be reported no later than at year end of 2015.

National action plan on prostitution and trafficking in human beings for sexual purposes

In July 2008, a national action plan for the prevention and combating of prostitution and human trafficking for sexual purposes was adopted, covering 36 separate measures, mainly directed to public agencies, in five priority areas:

· Protection and support for people at risk;

· Prevention;

· Higher standards and greater efficiency in the justice system;

· Increased national and international cooperation; and

· Higher level of knowledge and awareness in general.

The Government set aside SEK 213 million over three years to ensure the implementation of the proposed measures.[15]

In February 2018, the Government released a new national action plan, which incorporates as central the principles of gender equality, ending violence against women, ensuring equal opportunities for women and men, and their right to bodily integrity, international human rights value including those of the Convention on the Rights of the Child with a focus on the best interest of the child in the development and implementation of the action plan.

The action plan includes 38 separate measures in eight priority areas involving ten public authorities:

· Strengthened collaboration between public agencies and other actors;

· Strengthened preventative work

· Increased capacity to discover prostitution and trafficking in human beings;

· Legislative measures;

· Stronger protection and assistance to victims;

· More effective law enforcement;

· Strengthened knowledge and methodology development.

· Increased international cooperation.

The national action plan is not accompanied by any earmarked funding.[16]

3. NATIONAL ACTION PLAN

http://www.regeringen.se/492162/contentassets/24797d74f0bf447998138bc6b1...

Please find attached report in section 6

PROGRAMMES/INITIATIVES ADDRESSING TRAFFICKING IN HUMAN BEINGS

The Swedish Platform Civil Society Against Human Trafficking runs, since 2015, a National Support Program (NSP) that grant accredited service providers that live up to certain minimum standards funding for supporting and protecting victims of human trafficking. NSP lower the threshold for help and cover costs for supporting victims outside the legal process to ensure that they get access to their rights in accordance with international documents. Through NSP all VoTs unconditionally can be granted 30 days of reflection before reporting to the police, 90 days support outside the legal process and additional support and integration measures in accordance with international directives. Always also including in the assistance given are the children to the victims. As more than two third of the victims of trafficking that Civil Society meets and give assistance (according to the data collection) do not have any contact with authorities their first and only contact is with NGOs. They are the most vulnerable victims that cannot get access to their rights as potential victims of trafficking by any other stake holder then civil society. This is why the National Coordinator saw the need to fund the programme and through its existence try to make visible and find a structure for the VoTs that otherwise will be invisible and only helped on ad hoc-basis. Read more on www.manniskohandel.se
INFORMATION IN 14 LANGUAGES: https://manniskohandel.se/utbildning-information/

Salvation Army in Sweden runs an EU-project "Perspective on Rights". The objective is to strengthen the position of victims of human trafficking which are undocumented. It uses the rights-based approach to work with victims towards an existence in dignity in the Netherlands or the country of origin and tries to work towards a future in safety and freedom. The PoR project is a volunteer’s project, meaning that legal support is offered by volunteers which support a linked lawyer. Volunteers involved in the project are qualified legal professionals or law students who are committed to support one client for at least 6 months.
The project offers assistance for those victims which have become undocumented due to dismissals of criminal investigation as well as to those which have not yet pressed charges.
The legal support that is provided centers around three basic activities that contribute to strengthening the position of a victim of human trafficking. They include assistance in obtaining: a residency permit; a compensation of damage suffered; a passport or other documents of legal identification.
Given the extreme social and economic vulnerability of undocumented people, the support of the PoR project is not limited to legal assistance. Moreover, issues concerning shelter, income, medical care, finances, education and social networks are dealt with as well. There is a mutual exchange of assistance between the PoR-project and the National Support Programme, to cover and meet the needs of the victims as far as possible and for their best interest and safety.

ECPAT Sweden runs a hotline which receives anonymous reports from the public and from hotlines in other countries via INHOPE – an umbrella organization for hotlines working to combat online sexual abuse of children. The reports may concern child sexual abuse material (child pornography), trafficking in children for sexual purposes and travelling offenders. https://www.ecpathotline.se/

4. CROSS-BORDER COOPERATION TO ADDRESS TRAFFICKING IN HUMAN BEINGS

Projects

1. In 2016-2018, the National Rapporteur and the intelligence unit of the national Police Authority´s National Operational Department were involved in a project within the Eastern Partnership Police Cooperation Programme. This project consisted of a consortium of EU countries (Poland, Germany, France, Lithuania, Finland and Sweden), with Poland being the initiator and coordinator. The project was financed with EU funds from DG DEVCO[17] and its aid funds to the EU’s eastern neighbourhood.

The project aimed to support and strengthen police work with and between the six countries participating in the Eastern Partnership (Georgia, Ukraine, Moldova, Belarus, Azerbaijan and Armenia) on the basis of the countries’ joint and individual needs. The areas included depended on the identified needs in these six countries, but also on the Member States’ ability to contribute knowledge and expertise in various fields. Examples of areas in which Sweden contributed knowledge and expertise included, among others, matters relating to trafficking in human beings.

2. Since 2016, the National Rapporteur in Human Beings together with the Swedish-based NGO Institute for Feminism & Human Rights takes part in the European Commission-funded cross-border project on human trafficking, Disrupt Demand.

The project, which involves partners from six EU Member States, aims to identify and promote best practices to prevent and combat human trafficking for sexual exploitation by reducing demand. To achieve this aim, a combination of legal strategy research, and fostering cooperation among key stakeholders are employed. 

The Disrupt Demand project recognizes the harm inherent to the international trade in human beings for the purpose of prostitution, fueled by the demand for sexual services. By reducing demand, the entering of women, girls, boys and men into the prostitution trade can be prevented.

Website: http://disruptdemand.eu

3. Trafficking along Migration Routes (TRAM): Identification and Integration of Victims of Trafficking among Vulnerable Groups and Unaccompanied Children

Duration: January 2017 – August 2018 (20 months) 

Implementing agency: International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD)

Donors: The main project donor is the European Union (Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund). The project is co-funded by the Austrian Federal Ministry for Europe, Integration and Foreign Affairs. 

Project partners and co-funding donors: 

 Council of the Baltic Sea States Secretariat (CBSS);  Greek National Centre for Social Solidarity (EKKA);  La Strada International (LSI);  Bulgarian National Commission to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings (NCCTHB);  Terre des hommes (Tdh).

The project will be implemented in three Work Packages: 1. Work Package 1: Enhancing the knowledge of migration, asylum and anti-trafficking stakeholders in the targeted countries by conducting an assessment on a) the risk of exploitation and trafficking among vulnerable populations; b) gaps and needs analysis on stakeholder capacity in intervention responses and related training needs; and c) analysis of the integration of trafficked people in destination countries; 2. Work Package 2: Strengthening the capacity of the relevant stakeholders and improving the exchange of experiences and best practices for early identification, referral, service provision and integration of trafficked people among vulnerable populations, by fostering innovative methods and activities, such as the development of an e-learning module, two national trainings, and two webinars for practitioners in the participating countries and beyond;

3. Work Package 3: Enabling the integration of trafficked people in destination countries by developing local-level model strategic plans for the integration of victims of trafficking among vulnerable populations in selected destination countries (Germany, Finland and Sweden), as well as designing an integration roadmap targeting policy makers.

Key outputs:  Enhanced knowledge among migration, asylum and anti-trafficking stakeholders in the targeted countries as a result of the research assessment on a) the risk of exploitation and trafficking among vulnerable populations; b) gaps and needs analysis on stakeholder capacity in intervention responses and related training needs; and c) analysis of the integration of trafficked people in destination countries;  Strengthened multi-stakeholder cooperation at national and transnational level through their participation in two transnational seminars targeting a wide range of professionals;  Improved early identification, referral, service provision, protection and integration of victims of trafficking among vulnerable populations by delivering two national trainings and two webinars, as well as by making the e-learning module available online;  Enabled integration possibilities for victims of trafficking among vulnerable populations as a result of national round tables and pilot simulation exercises held in Sweden, Germany and Finland, model strategic plans and an Integration Roadmap for trafficked people.

Key deliverables:  Defined methodologies for developing the key project deliverables;  Country assessment reports for the targeted countries;  Final assessment report, printed and published, including assessment on separated and unaccompanied children, and revised indicators for identification of trafficking;  E-learning module available online;  Local model strategic plans for integration of victims of trafficking among migrants and refugees, including separated and unaccompanied children, in Sweden, Germany and Finland;  Roadmap document functioning as an overview and checklist of measures to facilitate the integration of trafficked people.

4. STROM II- Continuing to Strengthen the Role of Municipalities in the Work against Trafficking in Human Beings in the Baltic Sea Region

 STROM II was a follow-up initiative on the pilot implementation of the results, particularly guidelines for the municipalities, of the STROM project in selected municipalities in the Baltic Sea Region. It is a transnational project that aims to strengthen the capacity and role of municipalities in the chain of assistance to victims of human trafficking in the Baltic Sea Region.

Activities of the project: Setting up a working group against trafficking in human beings in all participating municipalities to help in implementation of the project activities.

Development of specific and sustainable referral mechanisms in the municipalities following the example provided in the Guidelines for Municipalities – Stepping up Action against Human Trafficking.

Organisation of a national meeting and multidisciplinary roundtable meetings at the local level as well training workshops for local experts to improve counter-trafficking activities in long term.

Implementation of tailor-made awareness-raising activities targeting vulnerable populations and groups at risk to be trafficked.

Organisation of a regional expert meeting to share experiences and to disseminate project findings and lessons learned during the course of the project implementation.

Participating countries:

Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and the Russian Federation

Nordic experts are invited to share their experiences in the project meetings

 Partners

Coordinator of the project: the Council of the Baltic Sea States Task Force against Trafficking in Human Beings (CBSS TF-THB)

Partners: Nordic Council of Ministers, NGO “Living for Tomorrow” in Estonia, the Ministry of Interior of the Republic of Latvia, the Ministry of Interior of the Republic of Lithuania, and Saint Petersburg Branch of the Russian Red Cross.

Duration

May 2016 ­–September 2017

STROM II meetings:

STROM II project kick-off meeting in Vilnius on 16 – 17 June 2016

National inter-institutional roundtable meetings in 2016: 14 September in Tallinn, 23 September in Riga, 5 October in Vilnius,

Multidisciplinary roundtable discussion on the implementation of the developed guidelines for municipalities in 2016: 7 October in Taurage; 13 October in Saint Petersburg; 14 October in Kaunas; 28 October in Haapsalu; 23 November in Jõhvi; 24 November in Leningrad oblast; 1 December in Liepaja; 16 December in Valmiera

STROM II project meeting in Riga on 1-2 February 2017

5. RELEVANT REPORTS

1. Annual report from the National Rapporteur

https://polisen.se/siteassets/dokument/manniskohandel/manniskohandel_lag...

2. SWEDISH LAWS, POLICIES AND INTERVENTIONS ON PROSTITUTION AND TRAFFICKING IN HUMAN BEINGS: A COMPREHENSIVE OVERVIEW

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/321254711_SWEDISH_LAWS_POLICIES_AND_INTERVENTIONS_ON_PROSTITUTION_AND_TRAFFICKING_IN_HUMAN_BEINGS_A_COMPREHENSIVE_OVERVIEW

Other relevant reports:

Reports from the Swedish Platform Civil Society Against Human Trafficking on the Platforms work:

1. Results from National Support Programme 2017 (In Swedish only): (NSP 2017 Rapport ärenden).

2. Data collection annually from the civil society (in Swedish only):

BY 14 september 2017. Civilsamhällets kontakter med utsatta för människohandel under år 2016

By 30 september 2016. Civilsamhällets kontakter med utsatta helåret 2015.

By 18 oktober 2015 Civilsamhällets kontakter med utsatta för människohandel, 2015

By 18 oktober 2014 Civilsamhällets kontakter med utsatta för människohandel 2014

Reports from the Swedish Platform Civil Society Against Human Trafficking on the situation in Sweden (in English):

1. OHCHR UN Special Rapporteur Trafficking 2018. Report on early identification and vulernability among VoTs in mixed migration flows. https://manniskohandel.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/final-report-ohchr-2018-sweden-24-01-2018.pdf

2. On the implementation of the Council of Europe Convention on Action against Human Trafficking in Sweden. Report from the Platform Swedish Civil Society against Human Trafficking https://manniskohandel.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/swe-platform-recommendation-to-greta-april-2017.doc

3. Second Report EU-directive 2011/36 Report from the Platform Swedish Civil Society against Human Trafficking EU-directive 2011/36. https://manniskohandel.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/second-report-eu-directive-swedish-civil-society-platform.pdf

National Task Force against Prostitution and Human Trafficking (NMT) has a webpage with all major publications from authorities; https://www.nmtsverige.se/publikationer

The NRM-mechanism in English: http://www.lansstyrelsen.se/Stockholm/SiteCollectionDocuments/Sv/publikationer/2016/R2016-29-national-referral-machanism-trafficking-webb.pdf

The role and function of Regional Coordinators (in English) https://www.nmtsverige.se/sites/default/files/Help-for-victims-of-human-trafficking.pdf

Reports from the Swedish Platform Civil Society Against Human Trafficking on the Platforms work:

1. Results from National Support Programme 2017 (In Swedish only): (NSP 2017 Rapport ärenden).

2. Data collection annually from the civil society (in Swedish only):

BY 14 september 2017. Civilsamhällets kontakter med utsatta för människohandel under år 2016

By 30 september 2016. Civilsamhällets kontakter med utsatta helåret 2015.

By 18 oktober 2015 Civilsamhällets kontakter med utsatta för människohandel, 2015

By 18 oktober 2014 Civilsamhällets kontakter med utsatta för människohandel 2014

6. RELEVANT LINKS TO NATIONAL AUTHORITIES/INSTITUTIONS WEBSITES AND OTHER RELEVANT CONTACTS

The Swedish Police Authority (Polismyndigheten) also appointed National Rapporteur

The police mission is described in the Police Act (1984:387). Among other things, it states that the police shall prevent crime, monitor public order and safety, conduct reconnaissance and carry out criminal investigations.

- https://polisen.se/

Appropriation decision for the 2018 budget year concerning the Police Authority (Government decision 22.12.2014).

- https://www.esv.se/statsliggaren/regleringsbrev/?RBID=18597

The Swedish Prosecution Authority (Åklagarmyndigheten)

- Link: https://www.aklagare.se

Appropriation decision for the 2018 budget year concerning the Prosecution Authority (Government decision 22.12.2014).

https://www.esv.se/statsliggaren/regleringsbrev/?RBID=18904

The Swedish Gender Equality Agency (Jämställdhetsmyndigheten)

To enhance efficiency and coordination long-term, and to counteract fragmentation, the responsibility for the coordination of the work to prevent and eliminate prostitution and trafficking in human beings for sexual purposes, and the national Victim Voluntary Return Project for victims of all forms of human trafficking previously held by the County Administration Board of Stockholm, has been transferred to the Gender Equality Agency.

- https://www.jamstalldhetsmyndigheten.se/

The Swedish Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority (Brottsoffermyndigheten)

The Swedish Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority (Brottsoffermyndigheten) is subordinate to the Ministry of Justice and led by a Director-General appointed by the Government. Its overall aim is to look after the rights of all crime victims and to draw public attention to their needs and interests.

- https://www.brottsoffermyndigheten.se/eng

Appropriation decision for the 2018 budget year

https://www.esv.se/statsliggaren/regleringsbrev/?RBID=18900

The Swedish Crime Prevention Council [Brå)

- https://www.bra.se/bra-in-english/home.html

The Council of the Baltic Sea States (CBSS)

- http://www.cbss.org/safe-secure-region/tfthb/

Swedish Platform Civil Society against Human Trafficking

The Platform is a human right based non-profit organization focusing on combatting human trafficking and to restore the dignity of victims of trafficking and further to work for strengthen human rights for victims. 

- https://manniskohandel.se/

Swedish Platform Civil Society against Human Trafficking

A human right based non-profit organization with the aim to jointly restore the dignity of victims of trafficking and to work for strengthen their human rights. The Platform join the civil society's forces to combat human trafficking. The members are experts and NGOs with a human right base, but with very varying target groups and agenda. Together the NGO can offer the whole chain of assistance; identification, first aid, medical care, clothes, support, legal advices, trauma treatment, long term assistance, safe return and integration.

The Platform performs the following tasks:
– coordinates the assistance to VoT, and gather data on the civil society’s contacts with VoT.
– runs a national support program that grant accredited service providers that live up to set up minimum standards funding for support to victims that give them access to rights the system otherwise could not provide (mainly entry to the NRM)
– monitors and reports on how international directive and conventions are implemented in Sweden, as well as the outcomes of measures taken and trends encountered.
– encourage and facilitates exchange of information and knowledge among the members in the Platform, but also to and with authorities and other actors.
– take part in educational and capacity-building initiatives at workshops, seminars and conferences, as well regional and national as international
– works for strengthen the entitled rights of VoT. The Platforms members do joint statements and have a dialogue with stakeholders and decisions makers to improve the situation for VoT.

Information in Swedish about the Swedish Platform Civil Society against Human Trafficking at: www.manniskohandel.se.

Download pamphlets in 14 languages at the web site!

Contact: info@manniskohandel.se


Salvation ArmySweden, several social centers, shelters and service providers and projects

 To strenghten rights https://www.fralsningsarmen.se/Verksamhet/Socialt-arbete/Manniskohandel/vart-arbete-mot-manniskohandel/

Talita is a non-profit organization offering both acute and longterm support to women who have been exploited in prostitution, pornography or human trafficking for sexual purposes. We have formed a method for rehabilitation that consists of safe housing, trauma therapy, education, planning for the future, transition to independent living (studies/work) and integration into society. Talita operates in Sweden, Mongolia and Romania. http://talita.org/

National Task Force against Prostitution and Human Trafficking (NMT) The NMT is a national collaboration of governmental bodies against prostitution and human trafficking instigated by the County Administrative Board of Stockholm. Regional coordinators against human trafficking give support and help to people who are victims of human trafficking. The information below is intended for people suspected of being victims of human trafficking. Here, you find information about our mission, what organisations we collaborate with and what help and support you can get from other authorities and organisations in your community or the Platform Civilian Sweden against Human Trafficking. https://www.nmtsverige.se/

Council of Baltic Sea States. The overall objective of the Task Force against Trafficking in Human Beings (TF-THB) is to counteract trafficking in human beings in the Baltic Sea Region through preventive and protective activities. The mandate of the TF-THB is to fight against trafficking in human beings and all of its forms of exploitation. Our actions aim at strengthening assistance to victims, promoting cooperation, abolishing gaps in existing approaches and improving legislation. The Task Force is composed of experts from relevant Government ministries in all the CBSS capitals. The work of the Task Force is realised by the Senior Advisor and her staff at the CBSS Secretariat in Stockholm, Sweden.

http://www.cbss.org/safe-secure-region/tfthb/

Footnotes

[1] The Hague Ministerial Declaration on European Guidelines for Effective Measures to Prevent and Combat Trafficking in Women for the Purpose of Sexual Exploitation (24-26 April 1997). Online at: http://www.legislationline.org/documents/action/popup/id/8747

[2] Appropriation decision for the 2018 budget year concerning the Police Authority (Government decision 22.12.2014).

[3] Government bill 2010/11:77, Raised maximum penalty for the purchase of a sexual service.

[4] Makt, mål, och myndighet (2017). http://www.regeringen.se/rattsdokument/skrivelse/2016/11/skr.-20161710/

[5] Jämställdhetsmyndigheten. Online at: https://www.jamstalldhetsmyndigheten.se/

[6]Supra.

[7] Online at: https://www.jamstalldhetsmyndigheten.se/stod-samordning/prostitution-och...

[8] The Aliens Act (2005:716), Ch. 5, § 15.

[9]Twenty-five (25) of these permits related to temporary residence permits for victims of trafficking in human beings.

[10]Council Directive 2004/81/EC of 29 April 2004 on the issue of residence permits to third-country nationals who have been victims of trafficking in human beings or who have been the subject of an action to facilitate illegal immigration, who cooperate with the competent authorities.

[11] Government Communication, Makt, mål, och myndighet: feministisk politik för en jämställd framtid (Skr. 2016/17:10). Online at: http://www.regeringen.se/rattsdokument/skrivelse/2016/11/skr.-20161710/

[12] Swedish Foreign Service Action Plan for a Feminist Foreign Policy (2015-2018). Online at: http://www.government.se/4990fa/contentassets/bca76b4547ad46fb929ece47e7cfe26d/swedish-foreign-service-action-plan-for-feminist-foreign-policy-2015-2018-including-focus-areas-for-2017.pdf

[13] Statement of Foreign Policy to the Riksdag 15 February 2017. Online at: http://www.government.se/statements/2017/03/statement-of-government-policy-in-the-parliamentary-debate-on-foreign-affairs-2017/

[14] Regeringens skrivelse 2013/14:91: Åtgärder för att stärka barns rättigheter och uppväxtvillkor i Sverige (20 February 2014) at 95. Online at: http://www.regeringen.se/rattsdokument/skrivelse/2014/02/skr.-20131491-/

[15] Government Communication, Handlingsplan mot prostitution och handel med människor för sexuella ändamål (Skr. 2007/08:167). Online at: http://www.regeringen.se/49b70e/contentassets/149560f55fcd4c0c9a77e86da272be4d/handlingsplan-mot-prostitution-och-manniskohandel-for-sexuella-andamal-skr.-200708167

[16] Government Decision, Ministry of Social Affairs, Handlingsplan mot prostitution och människohandel (2018-02-08 nr II:1). Online at: http://www.regeringen.se/492162/contentassets/24797d74f0bf447998138bc6b1...

[17] https://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/general_en