Together Against Trafficking in Human Beings

Denmark

Denmark

1. GENERAL INFORMATION- SITUATION ON TRAFFICKING IN HUMAN BEINGS

Combatting trafficking in human beings has been a political priority to Denmark since 2002. Between 2007 and 2016 a total of 632 persons have been identified as victims of trafficking in Denmark as shown in figure 1.

Figure 1:

Of the 632 persons identified as trafficked in Denmark from 2007-2016, a total of 517 persons were victims of trafficking into prostitution as shown in figure 2. The first victims of trafficking into forced labor were identified in 2009 and a total of 39 persons have been identified as victims of trafficking into forced labor from 2009-2016.

Figure 2:

As shown in figure 3, women make up the largest share of identified victims of trafficking in Denmark with a total of 547 persons (94 %). Male victims of trafficking account for 6 % of the total number from 2007 to 2016.

Figure 3:

The vast majority of identified victims were adults (95,5 %) while 27 persons (4,5 %) were children. Figure 4 shows the age distribution per year for identified victims of trafficking in Denmark.

Figure 4:

Read more about statistics and data on trafficking in Denmark on the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking website.

 

2. INSTITUTIONAL, LEGAL AND POLICY FRAMEWORK TO ADDRESS TRAFFICKING IN HUMAN BEINGS

The Danish Centre against Human Trafficking was established in 2007 and is responsible for coordinating and developing the nationwide social efforts for victims of trafficking and of involved parties. The Centre is anchored in the National Board of Social Services and reports to the Minister of Equal Opportunities.

A large number of relevant public authorities and agencies are involved in combating human trafficking, such as the police, the Prosecution Service, the Danish Immigration Service and The Danish Customs and Tax administration. NGOs are also important partners in the efforts to combat trafficking in Denmark.

To provide overall policy coordination, an inter-ministerial group meets on a regular basis. The following ministries are part of the inter-ministerial working group:

  • The Ministry of Employment
  • The Ministry of Justice
  • The Ministry of Trade and Development Cooperation
  • The Ministry of Equal Opportunities
  • The Ministry of Immigration and Integration
  • The Danish Immigration Service
  • The Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration
  • The Ministry of Taxation
  • The Ministry of Health
  • The Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • The Ministry of Children and Social Affairs

Likewise, relevant and important local stakeholders are involved through a National Referral Mechanism, comprising of six regional reference groups throughout Denmark that refer to a national reference group. The groups involve principal national counter trafficking actors. This approach aims to ensure that stakeholders at the local level are informed as well as involved in countering trafficking in Denmark. Read more about the Danish National Action Plan in the section below or on the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking website.

RELEVANT LEGISLATION

  • Section 262a of the Criminal Code criminalizes human trafficking. The section was inserted into the Criminal Code in 2002 in accordance with United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and the Protocols thereto and in accordance with the Council of Europe’s Framework Decision of 19 July 2002 on combatting trafficking in human beings.
  • In 2002, Denmark also ratified the UN-Protocol to prevent, suppress and punish trafficking in persons, especially women and children (the so-called Palermo Protocol).
  • In 2007, Denmark ratified the Council of Europe’s Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings, on the protection of victims of trafficking and the safeguard of their rights, which has been binding since February 2008.
  • Denmark is not bound nor subject to application of directives 2011/36/EU and 2004/81/EC, in accordance with Articles 1 and 2 of the Protocol on the position of Denmark annexed to the Treaty on European Union and to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. Notwithstanding these provisions, in 2012 Denmark raised the maximum penalty for trafficking from 8 to 10 years of imprisonment, extended jurisdiction in cases regarding trafficking and extended the provision to include exploitation for criminal activities in order to bring Danish criminal legislation in line with the EU directive 2011/36/EU on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings and protecting its victims. Further, in 2013 Chapter 24 of the Criminal Code on sexual crimes was modernized, which resulted in amendments of the wording in section 262 a on human trafficking.
  • The International Labour Organization’s (ILO) eight core conventions are today considered fundamental workers’ and human rights. These conventions also include the purpose of eradicating forced labour. Denmark has ratified 72 ILO-conventions, including the “Forced Labour Convention (C29)” and the “Abolition of Forced Labour Convention (C105)”. The ILO decided at its 2014 International Labour Conference to intensify efforts against forced labour by adopting a protocol to the Forced Labour Convention (C29), accompanied by the Recommendation (R203) on additional measures to effectively combat forced labour. The 2014-Protocol was ratified by Denmark in 2017.
  • Pursuant to the Administration of Justice Act, section 722 (2), charges can be withdrawn in a criminal case regarding trafficking if it is concluded that the person charged with a criminal offence is trafficked, that the crime the person charged with a criminal offence is accused of is directly linked to the trafficking case, and if the crime is not characterized as a serious crime. Examples of withdrawal of charges against victims of trafficking are cases of illegal stay, forgery of for instance ID-documents, begging, theft etc.

In the Danish Aliens Act, a number of sections concern the rights of victims of trafficking:

  • Section 9c(5): A temporary residence permit can be issued to an alien whose presence in Denmark is required for the purpose of investigation and prosecution. The residence permit cannot be renewed for a period longer than the duration of the investigation or prosecution.
  • Section 26a: The authorities must take into consideration – when making a decision regarding an expulsion order – if the ground for the expulsion is closely related to the person being a victim of trafficking.
  • Section 33(14): A reflection period of 30 days must be provided to all presumed victims of trafficking, regardless of victims willingness to co-operate with the authorities. This reflection period can be extended up to a total of 120 days if the victim opts for voluntary return to the country of origin and if he/she is cooperating with the authorities in this regard.
  • Section 56a(9): The Danish Immigration Service is upon request required to assist unaccompanied minors in launching an investigation for their parents – unless certain circumstances are present.

3. NATIONAL ACTION PLAN

There is a broad political agreement in the Danish Parliament behind the fight against human trafficking. Since 2002, National Action Plans (NAP) to Combat Human Trafficking has been in place, following the UN protocol on human trafficking (the so-called Palermo-protocol) from 2000 and the EU framework decision from 19 July 2002. The goal of the NAP 2015-2018 is to maintain, further develop and entrench the current national efforts against trafficking in human beings. A new NAP will be introduced in 2019 and will run until 2021. This will be the 5th in a series of national action plans to combat human trafficking since 2002, funded by the ‘rate adjustment pool scheme’ in Denmark. The Minister of Equal Opportunities is responsible for the coordination and implementation of the NAP to combat trafficking in human beings in Denmark. The ministry also chairs an inter-ministerial working group anchoring the Nap.

The NAP 2015-2018 addresses the following areas:

  • Preventing trafficking in human beings in Denmark and internationally
  • Victims of trafficking are sought out and identified
  • Victims of trafficking are offered individually tailored and coordinated support
  • Traffickers are prosecuted
  • Partnership and coordination

A multidisciplinary cooperation is established through the NAP between for instance the Danish police districts, the Public Prosecution Service, the Danish National Police, the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking, the Danish Tax Authority, the Danish Working Environment Authority, the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration, the Danish Immigration Service, the Union 3F, and the NGO’s Reden International, HopeNow, AmiAmi and the Red Cross.

The Ministry of Equal Opportunities has funded three projects that focus on outreach among risk groups in addition to the action plan. The projects are carried out by NGOs and labour organizations in collaboration with universities and consultancies. This is to ensure that outreach to individuals who have been trafficked into escort and private/discrete prostitution (carried out by HopeNow), forced labor (carried out by 3F) as well as unaccompanied minors in the asylum system (carried out by the Red Cross) is further examined, developed and strengthened. The projects will be finalized between 2018 and 2020.

Read more about the Danish NAPs on the Danish Centre Against Human Trafficking website.

PROTECTION OF THE VICTIMS AND ACCESS TO RIGHTS

The Danish Centre against Human Trafficking coordinates the support and assistance offered to victims of trafficking in Denmark to ensure a holistic and harmonized support, both concerning accommodation, access to medical treatment, psychological assistance, legal and social counseling and information to trafficked persons. The social efforts to provide protection and assistance to victims of trafficking in Denmark consists of the following elements:

  • Outreach: To locate and make contact with any person who might be subject to human trafficking
  • Identification: To officially identify victims of human trafficking
  • Direct assistance: To provide assistance and support to identified victims as according to the NAP

The outreach work is carried out by the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking and the NGO’s that hold a contract under the NAP. Outreach takes place in massage parlors, on the street, with persons who do escort and private/discrete prostitution, in asylum centers, in prisons and other places where potential victims of trafficking might be found. Furthermore, a hotline has been established in order to target police and front line personnel, victims of trafficking and private persons, who can report possible cases of human trafficking. In Copenhagen, a counseling center and health clinic for foreign women in prostitution has also been established as well as a health clinic in Aarhus.

In Denmark, the identification of victims of trafficking depends on the status of the potential victim at the time of the identification:

  • 1) If a person does not have a residence permit in Denmark, the Danish Immigration Service is responsible for assessing whether the said person is a victim of trafficking.
  • 2) If a person is staying in Denmark on legal grounds, the Centre against Human Trafficking is responsible for the assessment, which is based on one or more identification interviews. Social workers from the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking or an NGO with a contract under the NAP can conduct the identification interviews.
  • 3) Finally, the Danish courts can grant the status of a victim of human trafficking in cases where a potential victim of human trafficking is being trialed for a criminal offense.

All victims of trafficking are offered 30 days of reflection in accordance with the Danish Aliens Act (see the section on legislation for more information). The reflection period may be extended up to 120 days, if the victim cooperates with social organizations and the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking on the Assisted Voluntary Return scheme. As part of the restitution and reflection period, all victims are offered individually tailored and co-ordinated support regulated by the Danish Aliens Act and NAP. The array of assistance is not dependent on the victim’s co-operation with the investigation of a case against the traffickers. The assistance includes special accommodation (for instance shelters targeted trafficked women), extended access to medical services, access to legal counseling and assistance, psychological support and as mentioned an Assisted Voluntary Return and Reintegration scheme – including six months of assistance after returning to the home country.

The Danish Immigration Service has signed a contract with an external organization that carries out the Assisted Voluntary Return and Reintegration programme. In cooperation with the trafficked person, the external partner organizes the return and reintegration in collaboration with the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking, including reception, housing, activities and provision in the first six months in the country of return. The assisted voluntary return includes an allowance and can entail health and psychosocial support, education, vocational training or financial assistance to start a small business. The external partner organization monitors the return for 6 months in the country of reintegration.

Children are considered a particularly vulnerable group under the Danish Aliens Act. Therefore special protective measures are in place in relation to minors who are potential victims of trafficking. Most of the child victims of trafficking are either asylum seekers or irregular migrants. A broad range of stakeholders including the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking and other authorities such as the Danish police, the Danish Immigration Service, and the municipalities are involved in the efforts addressed at potential victims of trafficking who are children. Equally important are the reception and accommodation centers, social organizations conducting outreach work or child- and youth welfare institutions, staff in the penal system, including prisons and institutions for young criminals, hospitals, health units and tax authorities. These actors play and important role in ensuring early identification and support in accordance with the NAP. Children in the asylum system are accommodated in specialized centers with trained staff. A personal representative (and a professional legal guardian when relevant i.e. for unaccompanied minors) is appointed to children, who are potential victims of trafficking, and their applications for asylum are assessed in a fast-track procedure.

PROSECUTION OF TRAFFICKERS AND PERPETRATORS

Human trafficking is a serious crime, and the fight against trafficking has in Denmark been one of the crime areas subject to systematic and nationwide police monitoring.

Since 2006, the Danish National Police has provided the overall framework for the policing efforts, and up to 2010, these efforts were based on the National Police’s strategy for increased police action against prostitution. Since 2011, the fight against human trafficking has been increasingly decentralized to individual police districts as a result of experiences and lessons-learned.

In June 2014, the Danish National Police has revised a classified guide detailing efforts in this area to support the police districts’ handling of cases concerning human trafficking. The guide contains a general description of the different types of human trafficking including trafficking of children, trafficking into prostitution, forced labour and criminal offences.

The Danish National Police work towards strengthening partnerships between the police and other relevant partners such as the Tax department to ensure coordinated efforts against human trafficking. In addition, the National Police look into possibilities of cooperation with other authorities to carry out profiling of potential victims of human trafficking, e.g. in connection with applications for work permits.

The Director of Public Prosecution has published a set of guidelines relating to the handling of cases involving human trafficking in order to support the efforts of the police and the Prosecution Service in such cases. Among other things, the guidelines contain a description of the indicators of trafficking in human beings, which the police and the Prosecution Service should be aware of. The guidelines also contain a description of the different legal stages of such cases, including obtaining victims’ testimonies, residence permits to foreign witnesses during the trial, placing victims in shelters, and notifying victims of their rights to dismissal of minor charges relating to human trafficking such as forgery in connection with entry into the country.

PREVENTION

To prevent and detect human trafficking, the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking has launched a number of activities, including ongoing training of health professionals, staff at asylum centres, NGO’s, the police and other relevant professionals.

Likewise, awareness campaigns have been launched; for instance in 2014, where the campaign, “Stop Trafficking”, focused on trafficking into forced labour and prostitution. The campaign toured around Denmark with an exhibition showing and telling stories of trafficking. The aim of the campaign was to inform the general public, employers and companies of signs of trafficking, and how to react on a presumption of trafficking. The Ministry of Equal Opportunities will launch a campaign in 2018, with the two-fold aim of raising awareness about trafficking in human beings, and secondly to encourage victims to witness against the traffickers.

The Danish Centre against Human Trafficking has also developed a website with information on trafficking such as indicators, legislation, contact to a hotline and also including statistics on trafficking in Denmark. Part of the website has been tailored for primary school students, where a range of information on trafficking is disseminated specifically for school children.

With regards to private sector engagement to prevent trafficking and discourage the demand for trafficking in human beings, the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking has developed a tool, “Managing the Risk of Hidden Forced Labor – A Guide for Companies and Employers”, which serve as a set of guidelines for companies and employers in risk of being associated with forced labor. The guidelines have been prepared in consultation with a number of different stakeholders and it describes the risk of human trafficking into forced labor and how best to avoid being associated with such cases. Furthermore, the guide includes checklists of a number of measures, which advantageously may be taken by companies to reduce the risk of forced labor in the supply chain. The guide is part of a two-fold strategy to combat and prevent forced labor by focusing both on private sector mobilization and self-regulation as well as on the role of the authorities, inspection and regulation. A web-based version of the guidelines has also been developed as well as a capacity building component in the form of a training module for companies as part of a Nordic project on countering trafficking into forced labor funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers (read more about the Nordic project in Section on Cross-Border Cooperation). A version 2.0 of the guidelines will be launched and implemented by the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking in 2018.

 

4. CROSS-BORDER COOPERATION TO ADDRESS TRAFFICKING IN HUMAN BEINGS

Denmark supports international and regional organisations in combating and preventing trafficking.

For instance through bilateral funding contributions and through active participation in relevant forums such as the UN, ILO, EU, Council of Europe, Nordic Council of Ministers and the OSCE. Denmark is thereby taking an active role in keeping human trafficking on the international agenda. Denmark remains a strong advocate in the efforts to combat trafficking as well as in continuously improving the knowledge-sharing and cross-border collaborations.

Thus, Denmark engages in cooperation at bilateral, regional and international level with countries essential in combatting trafficking, for instance:

  • Denmark is represented by the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking and the National Police in the biannual meetings of the EU National Rapporteur and Equivalent Mechanism (NREM), which has proved to be an excellent platform for international information exchange and collaboration between the EU Member States.
  • Denmark is also a member of the Council of the Baltic Sea States (CBSS) Task Force against Trafficking in Human Beings. Between 2012 and 2014, Denmark participated in a regional initiative implemented under the auspices of the CBSS entitled “ADSTRINGO”. The objective of the project was to prevent trafficking in human beings into forced labor through enhanced national and regional partnerships and through a deeper understanding of the mechanisms that facilitate such exploitation.
  • The Danish Centre against Human Trafficking has participated in an EU-funded multilateral project. The purpose of the project was to map different sectors of the labor market with the aim of enhancing collaboration with stakeholders involved to prepare Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) guidelines to combat and prevent human trafficking in these sectors.
  • In 2013, the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking established a Nordic network against trafficking of children. The Nordic Network is an informal forum, meeting twice a year with participants from relevant authorities and NGO´s working with children who are victims of trafficking. The network contributes to the development of Nordic standards regarding trafficked children on topics such as identification, social services and support, protection, repatriation and (re)integration, prevention and partnership. Furthermore, the aim of the network is to improve data sharing and knowledge exchange across countries and to develop practices and procedures regarding minors that cross borders and travel between the Nordic countries. Finally, the network creates an arena for sharing concerns for specific groups and other trends in the area of trafficking.
  • With funding from The Nordic Council of Ministers, the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking has initiated a new Nordic project on countering trafficking into forced labor. The project received funding in 2016 and will be finalized in 2018. Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Finland, Aaland and Denmark will participate in the project, and the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking has the role of project manager. The objective of the project is to prevent and counter human trafficking into forced labor in the private and public sector through a strengthening of initiatives, cooperation, and information sharing and expertise within the Nordic countries.

The immediate objectives are: 1) Establish a Nordic forum for cooperation and an expert group to combat trafficking for forced labor 2) Develop nationally tailor-made guidelines for businesses within the private and public sector in each country to prevent and detect hidden forced labor 3) Develop a set of sector specific training modules in order to support implementation of the guidelines in each country 4) Engage with relevant stakeholders and businesses in the Nordic countries to enhance their knowledge on trafficking for forced labor, including the main risk factors and effective measures to minimize the risk of hidden forced labor. The expert group consists of one to four representatives from central coordinating and implementing authorities in the Nordic countries working with counter-trafficking into forced labor.

  • Denmark has also been active in supporting for instance the OSCE’s initiatives to combat forced labour and trafficking in the global supply chains where the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking representatives were invited to make presentations on several occasions to share expertise and knowledge on these topics. Likewise, Denmark continues to participate in OSCE trainings and as speakers at the OSCE High Level meetings.
  • The Danish National Police has a close cooperation with both Interpol and Europol, including EMPACT THB, EMPACT CHINESE and the former ETUTU cooperation, which focused on Nigerians. ETUTU is no longer a part of Europol but is now a project financed by the member states, which Denmark still participates in.
  • Based on funding from the Nordic Council of Ministers, the Danish National Police has published the report ”Exchange of Information in Cases of Trafficking in Human Beings”. For the purpose of the report, representatives from Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Denmark has participated in a study on how information is exchanged between different groups of authorities in these countries. Denmark hosted a Nordic meeting in May 2017, where the results from the report were discussed resulting in proposals on how to improve the cooperation between authorities in the different countries and across borders.
  • When relevant, Danish Police participates in joint investigation teams with other countries. In connection with a case, the so-called Operation Wasp’s Nest, a joint investigation team with Romanian authorities was established with assistance from Eurojust. The establishment of a joint investigation team was crucial for the investigation and for the subsequent court cases. The Romanian authorities assisted with wiretapping, questioning of witnesses and searches in Romania.

5. RELEVANT REPORTS

‘Exchange of Information in Cases of Trafficking in Human Beings – an inter-Nordic analysis’: https://norden.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:971195/FULLTEXT05.pdf 

Guidelines for companies and employers in relation to forced labour: https://ec.europa.eu/anti-trafficking/sites/antitrafficking/files/guidelines_risk_management_en.pdf

Reports by the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking (note in Danish only):

National Action Plans from 2002:
http://www.the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking.dk/materialer/Handlingsplaner-og-statusrapporter

The Danish national action plan 2015-2018 in English:
http://www.the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking.dk/in-english/copy_of_ActionPlantoCombatTraffickinginHumanbeings20152018.pdf/view

Evaluations and status reports:


http://www.the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking.dk/materialer/Handlingsplaner-og-statusrapporter/evaluering-af-center-mod-menneskehandel-2016/

 

The Director of Public Prosecutions guidelines (in Danish only): https://vidensbasen.anklagemyndigheden.dk/h/6dfa19d8-18cc-47d6-b4c4-3bd07bc15ec0/VB/382c520c-d785-4428-89b9-e21d1cfd52e0

 

6. RELEVANT LINKS TO NATIONAL AUTHORITIES/INSTITUTIONS WEBSITES AND OTHER RELEVANT CONTACTS

 

Government agencies

Equivalent to having a National Rapporteur, the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking (CMM) together with the National Centre of Investigation (NCI) of the Danish National Police are monitoring activities and the impact of anti-trafficking efforts in Denmark. The CMM and the NCI also cooperate with a range of other government and law enforcement agencies on documentation, developments and trends within the area. Below, partners in the National Action Plan and other relevant agencies and organizations are listed, including contact information.

The Danish Centre against Human Trafficking

w. the National Board of Social Services

Edisonsvej 1, 5000 Odense C

Telephone: +45 72 42 37 00

Hotline: + 45 70 20 25 50

E-mail: the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking@socialstyrelsen.dk

Website: http://www.centermodmenneskehandel.dk/in-english

Tasks: The Danish Centre against Human Trafficking constitutes the focal point of the national action plan to combat trafficking in human beings. The Danish Centre against Human Trafficking is responsible for coordinating and developing the nationwide social efforts for victims of trafficking and of involved parties. The Danish Centre Against Human Trafficking has health clinics and social workers in both Copenhagen and Aarhus. The Centre has consequently built up a resource pool of knowledge to work with the target group and reports to the Minister of Equal Opportunities. The Danish Centre against Human Trafficking also shares the role of equivalent mechanism with the National Centre of Investigation of the Danish National Police.

National Centre of Investigation of the Danish National Police

Polititorvet 14, 1780 Copenhagen V

Telephone: + 45 33 14 88 88

E-mail: nec@politi.dk

Website: http://www.politi.dk

Hotline: + 45 45 15 42 00

Task:

Based on intelligence and on an analysis-based approach, the police initiate investigations of relevant sectors in relation to human trafficking. The police also carry out operations concerning prostitution and operations connected to suspicions of forced labour or trafficking into forced crime. The police can also respond to international inquiries, international coordination or Joint Investigation Teams. The national centre of investigation also shares the role of equivalent mechanism with the the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking.

The Minister for Fisheries and Equal Opportunities and Nordic Cooperation, Department of Gender Equality

Asiatisk Plads 2, 1448 Copenhagen K

Telephone: +45 33 92 00 00

E-mail: Um@um.dk

Website: http://um.dk/da/ligestilling/

Task: The ministry is the responsible authority for the implementation of the National Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings. The ministry chairs the inter-ministerial working group anchoring the National Action Plan in Denmark.

The Director of Public Prosecutions

Rigsadvokaten

Frederiksholms Kanal 16, 1220 København K

Telephone: + 45 72 68 90 00

The prosecutor has developed a set of guidelines in relation to human trafficking, which is continuously amended in accordance with developments in the area.

The prosecutor also updates records of convictions for human trafficking to ensure that the prosecutors working on trafficking cases will have the up-to-date knowledge of the development of legal practice and precedence in this area. These records are available at www.anklagemyndigheden.dk.

The Tax Department (SKAT): Project Human Trafficking

Postal address:

Nykøbingvej 76, Byg. 45, 4990 Saxkøbing

Telephone: +45 72 37 02 42

E-mail: Projekt-Menneskehandel@skat.dk

Task: SKAT plays an important role in the identification of traffickers as well as victims of trafficking. SKAT visits many different workplaces in connection with its monitoring activities. The starting point for SKAT’s efforts in relation to human trafficking is therefore that the staff is aware of indications of human trafficking during their regular monitoring activities, thereby contributing to the identification of victims and traffickers. Their work also includes gathering of reports from all branches of the organisation and informing the police and/or the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking if any suspected cases of human trafficking have been identified. In addition, SKAT may also provide financial data to the police in investigations of specific cases of human trafficking.

The Danish Immigration Service

Ryesgade 53, 2100 Copenhagen Ø

Telephone: +45 35 36 66 00

E-mail: us@us.dk

Website: https://www.nyidanmark.dk/en-GB/Contact-us/Contact-the-Danish-Immigratio...

Task: For asylum seekers or foreigners without legal residence in Denmark, the Danish Immigration Service is responsible for assessing and deciding whether an individual is a victim of trafficking. The Danish Immigration Service determines the reflection period and is among other things responsible for accommodation, health treatment and the voluntary prepared return. The practical provision of the services, including repatriation, is carried out in close collaboration with the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking.

NGOs with a contract under the Danish National Action Plan

AmiAmi
Sjællandsgade 98 B, st.tv. 7000 Fredericia
Phone: +45 75 93 21 69

E-mail: vnn@amiami.dk

Website: http://amiami.dk/

Task: AmiAmi is a non-profit organisation supporting migrant sex workers and victims of sex trafficking through social work and healthcare. AmiAmi holds a contract under the Danish National Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings and cover South Jutland and Funen to offer advice and help to migrant sex workers including the services available under the action plan.

HopeNow

Drejervej 17, 2400 København NV

Phone: +45 +45 2616 1012

E-mail: info@hopenow.dk

Website: http://hopenow.dk/

Task: HopeNow is a non-governmental and volunteer organisation that works to seek out, identify and work supportively and motivationally with men, women and children who are potential victims of human trafficking. HopeNow holds a contract under the Danish National Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings and mainly work in the area of Copenhagen.

The Nest International
Colbjørnsensgade 12, st.tv.
1652 København V
Phone: +45 33 91 48 10
E-mail: info@redeninternational.dk

Website:https://redeninternational.dk/

The Nest International is a private institution assigned to YWCA´s Social Work. The Nest International holds a contract under the National Action Plan to Combat trafficking in Human Beings. The Nest works with foreign women in prostitution who are victims of Human Trafficking. The Nest works closely together with the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking in the Drop-In Centre in Copenhagen and is responsible for a shelter especially for trafficked women.