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The opinions expressed in the studies are those of the consultant and do not necessarily represent the position of the Commission.

References

References

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Best practice to promote cycling and walking (Dijkstra et al., 1998)

This pdf-document contains information about measures which are intended to stimulate cycling and walking so that the number of short car trips will be reduced. In general, two kinds of measures are presented: technical and non-technical measures which are friendly for pedestrians and cyclists. Examples of the first category are good cycle tracks and good crossing facilities. The second kind of measures concern rules and regulations, traffic signals, and public information and education. Each description of a measure is accompanied by illustrations: photos, diagrams of layout designs or other road elements, or illustrations of public information material. Infrastructure measures are sometimes provided with dimensions as well. Next, the advantages and disadvantages of the measures in terms of comfort, costs, safety, and social safety are described in as much detail as possible. Also discussed are the advantages and disadvantages for road users other than pedestrians and cyclists. If possible, a cost estimate is provided. Finally, the names of publications or organisations are listed as sources for more information.

The pdf-document is one of the reports of the ADONIS research project. The original title of the project is: Analysis and Development Of New Insight into Substitution of short car trips by cycling and walking. The ADONIS project was commissioned by European Commission as part of the Fourth Framework Programme, and ran from 1 may 1996 until end of 1997.

Design manual for bicycle traffic (CROW, 2007)

This design manual replaces 'Sign up for the bike' (CROW, 1993). It offers road designers and other interested parties extensive data on how to attain a bicycle-friendly infrastructure. A bicycle-friendly infrastructure is one that allows direct and comfortable cycling in a safe and attractive traffic environment. Only then is it possible to compete with the car. High quality bicycle infrastructures lead to a larger share of bicycles in the modal split. This design manual describes the steps required to achieve such an infrastructure, from the policy plan to promote cycling to the physical implementation of a bicycle-friendly infrastructure.