Newsletter
Issue n° 170 - 04 April 2014

Mobility and transport

In the spotlight

Seat belt

Road safety: Second good year in a row puts Europe firmly on track towards target

2013 is the second year in a row that saw an impressive decrease in the number of people killed on Europe's roads. According to preliminary figures, the number of road fatalities has decreased by 8% compared to 2012, following the 9% decrease between 2011 and 2012. This means that the EU is now in a good position for reaching the strategic target of halving road deaths between 2010 and 2020. Road safety is one of the big success stories of Europe. The 17% decrease since 2010 means that some 9000 lives have been saved.

Read full article


31 March 2014

Vice-President Siim Kallas, EU Commissioner for mobility and transport, said: "Transport safety is a trademark of Europe. This is why it is extremely important that the good results from 2012 were not a one-off. I'm proud to see that the EU is fully back on track to reach the road safety target for 2020. However, there are still 70 people who die on Europe's roads every day, so we cannot be complacent. We must continue our joint efforts at all levels to further improve the safety on European roads."

Country by country statistics (see table below) show that the number of road deaths still varies greatly across the EU. On average, there were 52 road deaths per million inhabitants in the EU. The countries with the lowest number of road fatalities remain the UK, Sweden, the Netherlands and Denmark, reporting around 30 deaths per million inhabitants. Notably Spain, Germany and Slovakia have improved their positions on the list, moving in among the traditional top performers.

Only a few years ago, in 2011, progress in cutting road deaths fell to a disappointing 2%. However, a reduction of 9% in 2012 and of 8% in 2013 mean that Member States are back on track towards the strategic target.

Those Member States that have made progress but whose road fatality figures are still much higher than the EU average (Poland, Bulgaria, Croatia, Latvia, Lithuania and Greece) are encouraged to strengthen their efforts. The situation in Latvia, where the road safety situation unfortunately did not improve at all during the past year, merits particular attention; the number of road fatalities also increased in Malta and Luxembourg although the total numbers in these countries are so small that the big fluctuations from one year to the other are not statistically significant.

Another worrying feature of the statistics is the situation of vulnerable road users: The number of pedestrians killed is decreasing to a lesser extent than expected and the number of cyclists killed has recently even been increasing. This is partly due to the fact that more and more people cycle; the challenge for Member States is to encourage people to use their bicycles rather than their cars more often, but to make sure that the shift from car to bicycle is a safe one.

EU Road safety action programme 2011–2020

The European Road Safety Action Programme 2011–2020 (see MEMO/10/343 ) sets out challenging plans to reduce the number of road deaths on Europe's roads by half in 10 years. It contains ambitious proposals focusing on making improvements to vehicles, infrastructure and road users' behaviour.

For example, key recent initiatives include the new European driving licence (IP 13/25 ) and the entry into force of the cross-border enforcement directive, for the pursuit of traffic offences across borders. A proposal for improved technical checks of cars has been adopted by the European Parliament (MEMO 14/637 ), and a major step has been taken towards a strategy to reduce the number of people seriously injured in road traffic (IP 13/236 ).

Following the breakthrough last year with a new common EU definition of serious road traffic injuries, EU Member States have now started to collect the first data by the new definition. The data collected during 2014 should be available in early 2015 and preparations can then start on a target for reducing the number of seriously injured in road traffic.

From 2015, a strategic target for the reduction of serious road traffic injuries is expected to be adopted.

More information:

EU Road Safety Vademecum

<phttp://ec.europa.eu/roadsafety

Country by country statistics on road deaths for 2013

 

Fatalities per million inhabitants (road fatality rate)

Evolution of total number of fatalities

2001

2010

2012

2013

2010 - 2013

2011 - 2012

2012 - 2013

Belgique/België

145

77

70

65

-15%

-11%

-7%

България(Bulgaria)

124

105

82

82

-22%

-8%

0%

Česká republika

130

77

71

63

-19%

-4%

-12%

Danmark

81

46

30

32

-30%

-24%

8%

Deutschland

85

45

44

41

-9%

-10%

-7%

Eesti

146

59

65

61

3%

-14%

-7%

Éire/Ireland

107

47

35

42

-11%

-13%

19%

Ελλάδα (Elláda)

172

112

92

81

-28%

-10%

-12%

España

136

53

41

37

-30%

-8%

-10%

France

134

62

56

50

-19%

-8%

-11%

Hrvatska

146

99

91

86

-14%

-7%

-6%

Italia

125

70

62

58

-17%

-5%

-6%

Κύπρος (Kypros)

140

73

61

53

-28%

-28%

-14%

Latvija

236

103

85

86

-17%

-1%

1%

Lietuva

202

95

99

85

-11%

2%

-15%

Luxembourg

159

64

66

87

36%

3%

32%

Magyarország

121

74

61

59

-20%

-5%

-2%

Malta

41

36

27

54

50%

-48%

100%

Nederland

62

32

34

-

6%

3%

-

Österreich

119

66

63

54

-19%

2%

-15%

Polska

145

102

93

87

-15%

-15%

-6%

Portugal

163

80

68

62

-23%

-19%

-9%

România

109

117

101

92

-21%

1%

-9%

Slovenija

140

67

63

61

-10%

-8%

-4%

Slovensko

114

69

55

42

-39%

-9%

-24%

Suomi/Finland

84

51

47

48

-5%

-13%

3%

Sverige

66

28

30

28

-1%

-11%

-7%

United Kingdom

61

30

29

29

-4%

-8%

-1%

EU

113

62

56

52

-17%

-9%

-8%



Memo -

Working together for safer roads in Europe: 10 highlights of Commission road safety work 2010-2014


31 March 2014

Road safety work in the EU has made great progress over recent years. Between 2001 and 2010, the number of fatalities on EU roads was reduced by a total of 43%. Between 2010 and 2013, it was reduced by a further 17%. However every road death is one too many - so we need to do more. The strategic target is to halve road deaths between 2010 and 2020 and also to start focusing EU efforts on reducing serious road traffic injuries. To achieve this goal, determined and joined-up action is needed from many actors at EU, national and local level.

At EU level, actions in recent years include the following 10 highlights:

1. European driving licence

In January 2013, the new European driving licence was introduced, in the form of a plastic "credit card," with a standard European format and tougher security protection (IP 13/25 ). The new driving licence includes a number of security features to make it "tamper proof" and, most importantly, it strengthens protection for the most vulnerable road users by raising the age limit for licences for the most powerful motorbikes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sE9ZG--lEYE

2. Crack-down on traffic offences committed abroad

Since November 2013, the EU Member States – except Denmark, Ireland and the UK - must implement the new cross-border enforcement directive (IP 14413/11 ), for the pursuit of traffic offences across borders. The background to the directive is that non-resident drivers account for 5% of the road traffic in the EU, but around 15% of speeding offences. The cross-border enforcement directive creates a mechanism to make it easier to enforce the rules by enabling police forces to exchange information about a road traffic offender in another Member State.

3. Safer lorries

In April 2013, the European Commission proposed new rules to allow manufacturers to develop more aerodynamic lorry cabins which will enhance the safety of vulnerable road users (IP 13/328 ). A more rounded shape reduces the risk of serious injury of pedestrians and cyclists in a collision at low speed, typically in an urban environment. The improved cabin shape also increases the field of vision of the driver. The proposal is currently being discussed in the European Parliament and the Council.

4. Tougher vehicle testing rules to save lives

In 2012, the Commission presented a proposal for an update of the legislation of periodic roadworthiness testing, on roadside checks on commercial vehicles and on vehicle registration documents. The objective was to raise the minimum standard of vehicle testing, to get more equal conditions on the internal market and to improve vehicle-related road safety. The roadworthiness package was adopted by the European Parliament in March 2014.

5. eCall roll-out from 2015

To help mitigate the consequences of serious road accidents across the EU, the Commission has presented proposals to ensure that by October 2015 all new cars will automatically call emergency services in case of a serious crash - the "eCall" system (IP 13/534 ). The proposal provides that all new models of passenger cars and light duty vehicles will be fitted with 112 eCall. The necessary infrastructure will also be created for the proper receipt and handling of eCalls in emergency call response centres - ensuring the compatibility, interoperability and continuity of the EU-wide eCall service. Estimates suggest that eCall could speed up emergency response times by 40% in urban areas and 50% in the countryside.

6. Infrastructure safety management

The infrastructure safety management directive provides a set of procedures to ensure that infrastructure is built to be safe and that it is regularly monitored to remain safe. The directive applies to the motorways that are part of the TEN-T network, but Member States can also apply the same principles to the secondary road network on a voluntary basis. The Commission has recently initiated a process to review whether the directive can be further developed in order to better contribute to safer roads.

7. A strategy to reduce serious road traffic injuries

Traditionally, road safety performance and targets have been about the number of fatalities only. But for every person who dies in road traffic, another ten to twelve are seriously injured, with life-changing consequences and high socio-economic costs. In 2013 the EU has taken a big step forward to tackle these serious injuries by identifying a common EU definition of injuries so as to enable the gathering of reliable and comparable data (MEMO 13/232 ). Based on that data, collected for the first time during 2014, the injuries problem can be analysed and the most effective counter-measures can be identified. From 2015, a strategic target for the reduction of serious road traffic injuries is expected to be adopted.

8. Road safety strategies and action plans

The Commission has initiated an exchange of lessons learned among Member States, making use of the wealth of experience collected by national authorities on national road safety strategies and action plans.

9. European Road Safety Day

The Commission regularly brings together the road safety community – experts, policy-makers, NGOs, victims' organisations, the industry, etc – to exchange views and tap their knowledge as to how best to further improve road safety work. taking into account all relevant perspectives. One major event, which is also open to the public, is the yearly European Road Safety Day. By offering such platforms for discussion, opportunities are opened for finding – together – solutions to the most pressing road safety problems in the EU. This year's European Road Safety Day will take place on 9 May in Athens, Greece. Registration is open and more information is available through the website http://ec.europa.eu/roadsafety .

10. European Road Safety Charter and road safety knowledge

The European Road Safety Charter, led by the European Commission, is the largest civil society platform on road safety. To date, more than 2,300 public and private entities have committed to the Charter and carried out road safety actions and initiatives targeted at their members, employees and the rest of civil society. (http://www.erscharter.eu/)

The European Road Safety Observatory and the EU CARE database are two important knowledge-building platforms, collecting data and information on road safety and making this information publicly available. In addition, the Commission contracts several studies and co-funds a number of projects on road safety. Since 2010, projects that were selected for EU funding have concentrated for example on road traffic enforcement, on safety for the most vulnerable road users and on serious road injuries. The results are available via http://ec.europa.eu/transport/road_safety.

Evolution of the number of road fatalities in the EU 2010-2020 (blue line marks EU target)

 



More news

Speech: Prospects and challenges of the European shipping industry


European Community Shipowners' Association (ECSA) Seminar

Brussels, 2 April 2014

Ladies and gentlemen

Maritime transport is a cornerstone of European industry. It plays an essential role in Europe's economy. The report presented today is a welcome reminder of this.

For me there is no doubt that Europe needs a high-quality shipping sector that can compete around the world. A sector where service quality, high levels of safety, environmental protection and operational efficiency win out over protectionism and low-cost sub-standard services. We are working hard with our partners outside the EU in trade and maritime transport to make sure of this.

Shipping rarely attracts media headlines. But when it does, this is more often because of accidents such as the Costa Concordia, Prestige or Erika, than because of its reliability and efficiency. As industry and as regulators, we need to do our utmost to prevent these kinds of disasters from happening again. They cast a shadow over shipping - despite its reputation as one of the safest and cleanest forms of transport.

Intra-EU shipping

Let me first say a few words about shipping inside the EU before I return to the global situation.

To reach our goal of shifting more traffic to sea, it has to be as easy for cargo to move across the EU on a ship as it is on a truck. This was the whole point of the Blue Belt initiative. The Blue Belt aims to extend the single transport market to shipping services, where customs administrations can follow ship and cargo movements, and where movements between EU ports are no longer treated as arrivals from overseas.

As you know, I am impatient to see this happen. And until recently, I was under the impression that it would happen soon. But now I hear there are sudden doubts about the feasibility of the e-manifest: a simple tool that would be enormously useful to raise Europe's competitiveness. I am now very concerned about whether we will see the e-manifest become a reality as soon as we had thought - and wanted.

But this is not the only initiative for reducing red tape and complexity involved in administration. As of 2015, the new Reporting Formalities rules will mean that ships only need to report once when they arrive at a port. The information will be available electronically to all relevant authorities and re-used as much as possible. This makes life easier for everyone – shipmasters, agents, owners and authorities. It brings shipping into the 21st century. After 2015 it is planned to explore further next steps to continue reducing the administrative burden for shipping.

The Commission has set up the European Sustainable Shipping Forum. Its dual objective is to progress on common solutions to environmental challenges and to increase the competitiveness of EU shipping. For example, we are now looking at issues related to low sulphur fuel, the use of scrubbers and using LNG as a marine fuel.

I would also like to mention the need for adequate state aid guidelines so that Europe can properly match its international competition. With today’s rules, we have achieved a good compromise between the specific needs of the sector and the general orientation of strict European rules for state aid. I know that many of you would like to adapt the rules further. While I have a certain degree of sympathy, I also know that this is not for the maritime sector to decide on its own. We need to keep an eye on the wider context.

Global regulation for a global industry?

Ladies and gentlemen

I share the belief of many of you that for an industry as global as shipping, we need to look to global regulation developed at the International Maritime Organization. I have been a strong supporter of the IMO within the Commission and with national ministers. Both the EU and IMO have a common goal of safe, secure and sustainable shipping around the world. It is our shared responsibility to demonstrate that global regulation works effectively. I therefore fully subscribe to the IMO's 2014 headline – "effective implementation of IMO conventions". It is up to us to help the IMO deliver.

Let me give two examples:

We are convinced it is now time to raise the level of safety that existing IMO regulations provide for the stability of passenger ships. Recent research has shown that their damage stability could be considerably increased. We think it is possible for a passenger ship carrying 6,000 people to survive 97% of all possible collisions – with minimal additional building and operational costs. It appears that current regulations statistically imply one major accident [like the "Estonia" ferry accident in 1994] occurring every 20 years. We think that, if this risk can be reduced to one such an accident in every 100 years, as research results show – then we should do it.

Rising emissions from shipping are another concern. As industry and regulators, we need to demonstrate together that we can deal with this issue effectively. It is clearly in our shared interest to show we are capable of reducing shipping emissions without compromising the sector’s economic performance.

I believe it should be possible to find an acceptable global solution for further reducing greenhouse gases, working together as we did with the Energy Efficiency Design Index. The EU, together with a multitude of partner countries and industry voices, proposes to build on that success by setting up a global system to collect data on fuel consumption and emissions.

I very much welcome the constructive engagement of industry. Your concrete contributions and understanding that it is important to act swiftly is essential to get such a global system in place. Too long a delay on this would represent a real danger.

Improved environmental protection does not need to lead to extra costs. I am convinced that it can also offer a number of opportunities, even in the hard times that shipping faces today. Reducing fuel consumption by raising efficiency not only means lower CO2 emissions but also lower fuel bills. It will also give European shipping a competitive advantage against rivals worldwide, or against other forms of transport at home.

These examples show for me that, by uniting our interests, the IMO can act forcefully. I know Member States, industry and the Commission do not always see eye to eye. But let me say clearly: we need to help each other to make sure that the IMO delivers safer and cleaner shipping, based on equal conditions for competition around the world. This is the way to act if we want to avoid the threat of unnecessary regionalisation, which is always around the corner. The shipping industry can only win from this approach.

Ladies and gentlemen

For any service industry people must be at the heart of the business. People are what makes or breaks the sector, whether they are Europeans or not, officers or ratings. Europe is blessed with a wealth of experience, with more 220,000 EU seafarers, some 18% of all seafarers in the world. But it remains a challenge to attract new recruits into the shipping profession; Despite shipping increasingly offering a high tech and management careers.

With their specific "know-how" and expertise, experienced seafarers play an important part in developing the wider maritime cluster. The range of the roles they are needed in after a seagoing career is vast: in shipping companies, shipyards, marine equipment companies, pilotage services and maritime law firms. They could also become port or flag state officers, harbour masters, join classification societies or work in other transport or logistics roles where maritime expertise pays off. In all these cases Europe needs strong seafaring expertise to maintain and develop EU industrial competitiveness. I believe we need to continue to help making maritime professions more attractive.

Ladies and gentlemen, at the end of my remarks, let me return to my opening point: We want shipping to prosper, to provide more and better employment and to drive innovation, so that it can serve a flexible, sustainable and competitive European economy.

I have one request and some thanks.

My request: to you to continue to engage, as an industry, early and constructively with regulators. I think we have seen over the last years that all sides can win if shipping is part of the solution – be the issue environmental, social or economic. And also that we can lose out if society is convinced that shipping is closing its eyes to the needs of reform.

My thanks: go to ECSA, in particular, for the pragmatic, stimulating and trustful cooperation over these years.

I wish you an ever safe, prosperous and clean journey.



Ten-T project: Seine river capacity near Paris to improve thanks to EU grant


03 April 2014

The European Union will support with a grant of over €1.6 million from the TEN-T Programme a project to modernise the Seine river in France in order to improve the economic efficiency and competitiveness of inland navigation in the region.

The project, selected for funding under the 2012 TEN-T Annual Programme, consists of modernisation works to five main locks located in Le Coudray, Vive-Eaux, La Cave, Varennes and Evry (currently not in operation), with the objective to increase their availability and reliability.

The works will consist of upgrading the different structural parts of the locks, such as their sluice chambers, aqueducts, hydraulic units and electrical cabinets, piers and control rooms.

As a result, the existing bottleneck in inland navigation of the Haute Seine will be overcome and its accessibility will be improved, which will boost intermodality and increase the competitiveness of inland waterways as a whole.

2012-FR-91103-S

2012-FR-91104-P



Ten-T project: Studies for Slovenian rail track upgrade get a boost from EU grant


25 March 2014

The European Union will co-finance with €1.7 million from the TEN-T Programme a series of dedicated studies aimed at completing the execution design for upgrading a section of double track rail in Slovenia which, when built, will contribute to the realisation of the "Railway axis Lyon-Trieste-Divaca/Koper-Divaca-Ljubljana-Budapest-Ukrainian border" (TEN-T Priority Project 6 ).

The studies, selected for funding under the 2012 TEN-T Multi-Annual Programme, concern the upgrade of the existing 25 km long double-track electrified line between Zidani Most and Celje. They will be used as input to further decision-making and are a precondition to start the line upgrade according to the applicable Slovenian law.

The capacity PP6, after the completion of the works on the section, will be above 40 million tonnes of rail freight per year. The project therefore plays a significant role in reducing the number of trucks crossing the Alps. This is particularly relevant for the environmentally sensitive Alpine region where road traffic is at the origin of important effects on the environment.

For more information, please consult the project's page !



Commissioner's corner

Speech: Europe's railways at a junction: the future for freight

"The Commission has great ambitions for rail. These are for rail to achieve its full growth potential, to make it faster, more punctual, efficient and reliable. To achieve all that, rail services need to be customer-driven. This is the key for success in both freight and passenger transport."

Siim Kallas

Read the full speech


European Rail Freight Association Annual Assembly

Brussels, 1 April 2014

Ladies and gentlemen

Thank you for inviting me to your 12th General Assembly today.

I should start by congratulating the organizers on their choice of theme for this seminar. I fully agree that Europe’s core transport network needs the 4th Railway Package.

As you can see from our proposals, the Commission has great ambitions for rail. They are underpinned by several factors driving my philosophy for rail reform.

These are for rail to achieve its full growth potential, to make it faster, more punctual, efficient and reliable. To achieve all that, rail services need to be customer-driven. This is the key for success in both freight and passenger transport.

I think all of us here today can share these principles.

But, as we move ahead, the second sentence in today’s seminar theme puts it very well: regarding the 4th Package, there certainly has been enough talking .

It is time to act, because the rail sector now has to continue and accelerate the reform process that has been started.

European Rail Freight Association and its members are an important force for revitalising the European rail freight market and putting it back on the path to growth after decades of decline.

I am aware this has not always been an easy challenge, given the resistance from some in the market who are not so prepared - or committed - to change.

However, we are now seeing small signs of progress, with encouraging results in some EU countries – like Denmark, the Netherlands and UK - where some real competition is developing for rail with other forms of transport.

In these countries, we have seen increases in absolute freight volumes and in some cases, even increases in market share for rail. This is a historic reverse to its long-seated trend of decline.

The results have been higher cost efficiency, better cost competitiveness and improved customer orientation.

And more internationalisation too, badly needed in a market whose traditional market players have been very nationally focused for a very long time.

But this is also a market which is European, not national – around 50% of rail freight tonnage-kilometres are international. It’s a market where customers and shippers expect borderless European transport services and logistics.

They expect better connections with ports and better service quality through the entire logistical chain.

To me, it confirms that market opening is the right medicine to generate growth.

It will allow us to increase rail’s market share of transport use, by attracting more companies through raising service quality and efficiency.

This is a major challenge, of course. We know that capacity demand for freight is growing and therefore there has to be sufficient capacity for freight in the railway system.

It also presents an opportunity for Europe’s people, businesses and economy.

With the 4th Railway Package, we have the chance to create – finally – a single European Rail Area that will allow rail freight to compete with road freight.

It goes hand in hand with our work to revitalise Europe’s railways by making more use of research and innovation. This will help rail to provide better and more efficient services so that customers have an attractive choice.

The new public-private partnership Shift2Rail triples our funding for research and innovation in rail. Over the next 7 years, almost €1 billion of public and private funds will be invested.

Ladies and gentlemen

We are already making good progress in raising the role of rail freight by developing nine international corridors with which you are all familiar.

As you know, six corridors became operational last November: an important milestone in the creation of a European Rail Network for Competitive Freight.

I know that many of you are involved in the Advisory Groups of Rail Freight Corridors and I would like to thank you for your participation and involvement.

The corridors will be the backbone of Europe’s planned core network corridors.

They will help to raise the competitiveness, quality and efficiency of rail freight.

They will lead to better cross-border coordination and cooperation between rail infrastructure managers so that international freight traffic can flow more smoothly between EU countries.

Apart from a proper legislative and regulatory environment, some other conditions must be met if these corridors are to be successful and efficient.

Firstly, targeted and coordinated investment to make sure that the infrastructure is of a sufficiently high quality. For this, substantial amounts of EU funding are available.

One important objective is to implement the infrastructure requirements for the Trans-European Transport Network.

It is also essential for ERTMS to be properly deployed across Europe’s entire rail network so that full interoperability is achieved as soon as possible.

Multiple systems delay the authorisation process, increase costs, reduce availability and are just hampering the development of the corridor.

I know that migrating to ERTMS poses big challenges for everyone involved.

But it is particularly important for freight traffic, which flows across borders to a much greater extent than passenger traffic.

Our priority is now is to meet these conditions. That said, I am convinced that the corridor approach will be successful and will trigger a snowball effect.

It is, of course, important to make sure one or two corridors are successful. But railways also need a network, which is where interconnections between the corridors become important.

Ladies and gentlemen

Let me conclude by returning to the 4th Railway Package. I know that many of you are following these important proposals very closely.

Many of you have also expressed your strong support, for which I would like to express my thanks.

The European Parliament has now finalised its first reading position on the six legislative parts of the package. It is now up to the Council to take its position.

On the technical elements of the package, Parliament confirmed the need to remove existing administrative and technical barriers.

But its plenary vote on the governance proposal came as a real disappointment; not only for the Commission, but also for many in the rail sector. It is simply not the strong signal that European rail needs - and expects - to raise its attractiveness.

This vote demonstrates, yet again, the tenacity of vested national interests that proved more appealing to MEPs than the balanced and well-reasoned compromises that the Transport and Tourism Committee reached last December.

The EP’s amendments fail to ensure the effective independence of the infrastructure manager, or financial transparency within vertically integrated structures. These are vital to guarantee equal and non-discriminatory access to the European rail network. The concept of “ Chinese walls” is still important – particularly for rail freight.

So far, the Council has examined the proposals sequentially. It has now reached a position on the whole technical pillar. It is now important that examination of the market pillar starts as soon as possible.

Let me say now clearly that we remain committed to our proposals. For the Commission, there are certain ‘red lines’ that cannot be crossed. We are not about to abandon the market pillar, for example.

I do not see any option for accepting solutions that would fall below the provisions – or rather, the progress – already achieved with the Recast of the First Railway Package.

Ladies and gentlemen

I would like to thank you again for your support throughout. I wish you an excellent evening of discussions as we continue to work together to create a Single European Rail Area for freight.

Thank you for your attention.



.

Figure of the month

8 billion

26 Billion euro in funding will be provided by the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) to transform today’s patchwork of roads, railways, airports and canals into a unified trans-European transport network.

We were asked about...

Question asked by Sergio Paolo, Francesco Silvestris (PPE)

(12 February 2014)

Subject: Awareness of road safety training

The night of 10 February witnessed one more in a long line of tragic road accidents. In Milan a white van ran over a boy of just 10, who is now in a coma. The driver abandoned the van a few metres beyond the accident and ran off, but was caught by the police several hours later.

The subject of road safety training remains of primary importance in Europe, together, despite the targets so far achieved, with the objective of halving the number of road accident victims by 2010, currently standing at ‐42%.

In view of the above, can the Commission specify the following:

  1. Has it adopted any instruments or guidelines aimed at reinforcing road safety training in Member States?
  2. Does it intend to define new objectives in terms of the reduction of the number of road accident victims?

Read the answer


Answer given by Mr Kallas on behalf of the Commission

24.03.2014

1. With the full entry into force of Directive 2006/126/EC on driving licences from 19 January 2013, the rules on obtaining a driving licence for mopeds, motorcycles, trucks and lorries have been strengthened and minimum requirements for driving licence examiners have been introduced. In addition, the directive 2003/59/EC on initial qualification and periodic training of professional truck and bus drivers set minimum requirements for road safety related training of these drivers.

2. The EU has already adopted an ambitious target to reduce the number of road deaths by half between 2010 and 2020. In addition, a new target is being discussed on the reduction of serious road traffic injuries. Such a target could earliest be set in 2015, when first data on serious injuries will be reported by the Member States. For the long-term, the objective is to reduce the number of road traffic crash victims to almost zero.



Transport and You

Events

More on transport

Passenger rights app
Success Stories
Connect to compete!
Port infographics
Going abroad: Traffic rules
Do the Right Mix
DG MOVE - website