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  • 20/07/2016

    Duration of unemployment and self-perceived health in Europe

    This study highlights the strong relation between unemployment, especially long-term unemployment, and poor self-perceived health. It shows that unemployment increased bad and very bad self-perceived health in European countries between 2004 and 2013. The longer the duration of unemployment, the stronger is the effect on self-perceived health.  The study helps evaluate more comprehensively the impact of the crisis, (long-term) unemployment and inactivity on the health of individuals, thus showing that the labour market situation spills over into other important areas of public policy such as healthcare.

  • 28/06/2016

    EU Employment and Social Situation - Quarterly Review – Summer 2016

    The review confirms an increase of the overall employment rate, for both the EU and the euro area – an increase representing 3 million more employed people in the EU than one year before. The overall long-term unemployment rate, at the other hand, decreased by 0.6 pp compared to a year before and stands now at 4.3% of the labour force. This is the largest reduction since the first decline in long-term unemployment observed in 2014. In addition, for the first time since the start of the economic recovery, the number of very long-term unemployed (unemployed over two years) dropped more strongly than the number of people long-term unemployed for less than two years. Finally, this season's edition also shows a continuous improvement and convergence among Member States regarding youth unemployment, which has decreased more strongly in countries most affected by the crisis.

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    See also: Employment and Social Developments in Europe 2015

  • 25/04/2016

    Flexibility versus Stability - A difficult tradeoff in the Eurozone

    Since the eruption of the sovereign debt crisis in the Eurozone, substantial efforts have been made to create a new form of governance for the Eurozone that will make the monetary union more robust in absorbing future economic and financial shocks. Much of the drive to adapt the governance of the Eurozone has been influenced by the traditional theory of optimal currency areas (OCA), which stresses the need for flexibility in product and labour markets. As a result, the Eurozone countries have been pushed towards structural reforms that aim to reduce the structural rigidities in product and labour markets. In this paper we ask whether this movement towards structural reform as part of the push for new governance is really going in the right direction. We will argue that this is not the case. The main reason is that the nature of the shocks that have hit the Eurozone does not correspond to the pattern of asymmetric shocks that has been identified by the OCA theory to require more flexibility. We will argue that what is needed in the Eurozone is not more structural reforms but a better mechanism capable of dealing with the classical boom and bust dynamics that are inherent to capitalism.

  • 12/04/2016

    EU Employment and Social Situation - Quarterly Review – Spring 2016

    The activity rate in the EU has continued its steady increase since 2008, in particular for older people, though not yet for younger people, as highlighted by this edition of the Employment and Social Situation Quarterly Review. Employment rate has returned to its pre-crisis level but with a much wider gap between countries, from 55% in Greece to 80% in Estonia, Germany and Sweden. The publication also stresses that permanent and full-time jobs continue to increase, though at a slower pace than in 2014. The financial situation of EU households continues to improve, with more available income in nearly all Member States, though financial distress remains high for households with the lower income. 

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    See also: Employment and Social Developments in Europe 2015

  • 11/02/2016

    EU Employment and Social Situation - Quarterly Review – Winter 2015

    The 2015 winter edition of the Employment and Social Situation Quarterly Review shows improvements on the EU labour market.

    Employment and activity rates have continued to increase in the EU, across all population groups and most notably for older workers (55 - 59 years). In the third quarter of 2015, the overall EU employment rate has even reached its pre-crisis level, although the progress is unevenly distributed among Member States. In addition, unemployment has continued to recede and the share of long-term unemployed persons in total unemployment has slightly gone down.

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    See also: Employment and Social Developments in Europe 2015