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RTD info logoMagazine on European Research Special Issue - August 2003   
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 HOME
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
 EDITORIAL
 'Let’s be proud of our researchers'
 Research: a vocation
 Choosing a mentor
 Momentum to move
 Drawn to the USA
 Everyday life in Japan
 Balancing the gender equation
 A boost for science
 University challenge
 Migrating to the private sphere
 The incorruptible Marie
 National associations of students, PhDs and researchers

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FEATURE
 

Logo Marie Curie Actions: A guide to mobility opportunities and tools for researchers without frontiers

This special guide contains a wealth of useful information on exciting research grant and scholarship opportunities offered by the EU's Marie Curie programme.

 
 


  Philippe Busquin
Interview
'Let’s be proud of our researchers'
Human resources are central to the dynamic of the European Research Area. This is why the Sixth Framework Programme is allocating nearly 10% of its funding to actions which relate directly to them. Commissioner Philippe Busquin sets out his views on the subject.  
 
Testimonials
Research: a vocation
The life of a researcher resembles that of his research – a constant questioning. A decision to embark on a research career is usually preceded by considerable soul searching. It could be described as a vocation; it is certainly a passion. The path can be tortuous: doctorates, post-doctorates, grants and temporary contracts, promises of permanent posts, uncertainty about which direction to take, stiff competition, the constant search for funds, and projects which ultimately lead nowhere.   Add a little luck, a large dose of intuition and imagination, and the picture is complete!  
  Shu-Wang Qiao
Testimonials
Choosing a mentor
What do doctoral and post-doctoral students think of their mentors? What role do these experienced scientists play in the destiny of budding researchers? 'The choice of supervisor can be important and help determine your chances of success. But it is not the only factor,' says Augusto Palombini, an active member of the ADI (Italian association of doctoral students and researchers). It is an opinion that is sometimes questioned, and often shared. Here is how some others view the situation.
 
Mobility
Momentum to move
Mobility strengthens the links between laboratories, helps centres of excellence to form and enables researchers to carry out research they may not be able to do at home, exposing them to other cultures and approaches. But mobility has its downside too – when researchers are forced to chase after funding from institution to institution. Nevertheless, who can deny the benefits of human resource mobility? This is why it is at the heart of the Union's new research policy.  
 
Mobility
Drawn to the USA
More than one in seven doctorates received by foreigners in the United States are awarded to Europeans. Of these Europeans, about 75% stay behind. With generous research grants, state-of-the-art facilities, an international environment and streamlined bureaucracy, America has a lot going for it.
  Jens Nieke
Mobility
Everyday life in Japan
The research field stretches far beyond the USA. Japan, which ranks number three worldwide in the R&D league, is particularly dynamic, with many opportunities for young researchers to pursue fascinating programmes. The German Jens Nieke is one of those who took the research route to Tokyo.
  Scissors diagram for EU average in % (1988-1999)
Women and science
Balancing the gender equation
Are women the future of research? As the Union finds itself facing a growing shortage of researchers, the failure to exploit the potential of half its population – who in fact obtain more university degrees than men – is a terrible waste. But to correct the imbalance, the scientific world must do something to overcome its prejudices and taboos.  
 
Education
A boost for science
Young people are becoming increasingly disenchanted with science. They no longer view scientific studies and careers as attractive.   Yet science can be fascinating and is crucially important in an increasingly technical world. So what can be done about it? Scientists, teachers and science museum curators have decided to act. Informal education, interactive Internet sites, continuous training and a more active approach to science teaching are just some of the methods they are using to spark renewed interest. 
  Minerve Centre - Free University of Brussels (ULB).
Higher education
University challenge
With increasing globalisation and competition, the erosion of public budgets, and a changing socio-economic environment, universities are facing the complex challenge of successfully changing without sacrificing their academic freedom or compromising their fundamental research and teaching missions. Given their central role in the knowledge economy and society, the Commission has launched a wide-ranging debate on the future role of universities and the changes they are confronting.
  Applied research on the powering of a mode of transport in Wildenrath (Germany). 
© Siemens
Industrial research
Migrating to the private sphere
Companies too have their researchers and Nobel prizewinners. From multinationals to small enterprises that spring up near university campuses, fascinating careers beckon in the private sector.   There is just one problem: the scarcity of posts and the generally low level of private investment in top-level human resources.   
  Marie Curie
Tribute
The incorruptible Marie
Marie Curie was the only famous person ‘who’s fame has not corrupted' – at least that was the glowing verdict of esteemed physicist Albert Einstein. RTD Info looks at the life of an exceptional woman scientist whose name has become a standard-bearer for the excellence of European research. 
  Marie Curie
Address book
National associations of students, PhDs and researchers