IMPORTANT LEGAL NOTICE - The information on this site is subject to a disclaimer and a copyright notice
Banner Research
English
 
  European Commission   > Research > Key Action 5
 
index by sub-area 5.1.1. Sustainable agriculture/Plant Systems
index by country United Kingdom
 

New plants and plant extracts to decrease methane and nitrogenous emissions from ruminants and to alleviate nutritional stress *

Contract nr: QLRT-CT-2000-00992
Project type: RS (Research and Technological Development Project)
Starting date:
Duration: 36 months
Total cost: 2,585,822 EUR
EC Contribution: 2,046,982 EUR
Scientific Officer:
Research topic: 5.1.1. Sustainable agriculture/Plant Systems

Abstract:
The aim is to develop new plants or plant extracts as dietary supplements for ruminants to replace chemical additives and growth-promoting antibiotics. The plant materials will be collected from botanical and industrial collections, and they will be evaluated for their ability to alleviate nutritional stress in ruminants, by preventing lactic acidosis and bloat, and to decrease pollution, by preventing methane formation and decreasing nitrogen excretions. Bloat and acidosis are distressing disorders which result from malfunction of microbial digestion in the rumen. Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, and ammonia, which forms urinary urea, arise from normal rumen fermentation. The project will deliver plant-based, sustainable solutions to these problems. The results will benefit the EU biotech and agricultural industries and increase crop diversity.

Objectives:
The project will explore the potential of new plant species/plant extracts as feed additives for ruminants, to overcome long-standing problems of animal welfare and environmental damage. A common resource of plant materials will be created. Samples will be identified within the collection which inhibit lactic acid production, bloat, methane formation or nitrogen loss resulting from rumen fermentation. Plants suitable for agronomic exploitation and extracts with commercial potential will be identified and tested further in feasibility experiments. A successful outcome will lead to: new crops/plant extracts being used as feed additives, replacing synthetic additives, including antibiotics; increased diversity of plant species in cultivation; improved animal health and welfare; decreased environmental emissions of methane and nitrogen-rich animal wastes.


Coordinator
John C MacRAE
Rowett Research Institute
Bucksburn, Aberdeen
UNITED KINGDOM
Tel.: +44 1224716611
Fax: +44 1224715349
E-mail: J.MacRae@rri.sari.ac.uk


Partners
  Ingrid ENDE
Universitaet Hohenheim, Institute for animal production in the Tropics and Substropics
Stuttgart
GERMANY
Tel.: +49 7114592077
Fax: +49 7114593289
E-mail: ende@verwaltung.uni-hohenheim.de
  Marcelino PÉREZ DE LA VEGA
Universidad de León, Departamento de Producción Animal
León
SPAIN
Tel.: +34 987291637
Fax: +34 987291638
E-mail: recvi@unileon.es
  Angela PETTIT
The University of Reading, the Centre for Dairy Research
Reading
UNITED KINGDOM
Tel.: +44 1189318977
Fax: +44 1189318979
E-mail: a.s.pettit@reading.ac.uk
  Ronan POWER
Alltech Ireland Ltd / Research & development section
Dunboyne, CO. Meath
IRELAND
Tel.: +353 18252244
Fax: +353 18252251
E-mail: rpower@alltech-bio.com
  Riccardo LOSA
CRINA SA
Gland
SWITZERLAND
Tel.: +41 223643230
Fax: +41 223642817
E-mail: Riccardo.losa@akzonobel.com