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image European Research News Centre > Research and Society > A channel portal
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image image image Date published: 16/10/02
  image A channel portal
RTD info special "Talking Science"
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Archimède (Arte – France/Germany)

In what way does science affect us all? The weekly magazine programme Archimède tries to provide some clear answers to this vast question. Each programme covers five or six subjects, approached in a variety of ways, in an attempt to make viewers more aware of scientific research. It is produced by Ex Nihilo for Arte France and ZDF. For enthusiasts, Arte has also just launched a series devoted specifically to the world of trees (Sylva) and a series of documentaries on archaeology (L’aventure humaine).
http://www.arte-tv.com/emission/
emission.jsp?node=-65

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C’est pas sorcier (France 3 – France)

A rare event on television: a science and discovery programme aimed at young people in their early teens. On board their travelling laboratory, Frédéric Courant, Jamy Gourmaud and Sabine Quindou take the youngsters off to strange and often spectacular locations, providing clear, fun and practical explanations on all kinds of subjects - from aluminium to amphibians, including the water cycle. C'est pas sorcier attracts a large audience, is also broadcast in Belgium and is available on video.
http://www.france3.fr/semiStatic/42-223-NIL-1651.html

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Delta (Hungary)

Launched in 1964, Delta is the science magazine programme on Hungarian public television. In the space of 25 minutes it presents a series of news reports and short documentaries on the latest developments in the world of science and technology. Its clear language and attractive presentation enable it to reach a wide audience.
http://www.mtv.hu/

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E =M6 (M6 – France)

Over the past ten years, the E=M6 team has managed to attract a weekly audience of 4 million viewers to this popular weekly science programme which goes out at peak viewing time on this private channel. The magazine programme aims to increase understanding of nature, the world and technologies around us. Science is often explained through the prism of daily life, with experts from various disciplines (doctors, sociologists, nutritionists) analysing the day-to-day life of a French family, for example. Special programmes also try to shed light on an increasingly complex environment, thanks to the answers provided by scientists and technicians.
http://www.em6.fr/

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Encyclopedia (France)

A window on every field of knowledge … understanding the world, retracing the history of thought, investigating the great scientific enigmas. Curiosity is the watchword for the wealth of eclectic documentaries broadcast by this channel. Its flagship programmes are Les exploits de la recherche, which presents the past, present and future of science and technology, La science en questions, which focuses on a topical science subject, and Côté science, an educational programme on the major science subjects of our times.
http://www.encyclopedia.fr/

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Equinox (Channel 4 – United Kingdom)

This is the principal science slot of the British public service channel which devotes 5% (£20 million) of its annual budget to programmes on science and education. These cover topics such as health (Body Story), space (Destination Mars, Planet Storm), robotics and archaeology (Lost Worlds). As Science and Education co-ordinator Sara Ramsden explains, Channel 4 is interested in 'any good programme, with a serious content and entertaining presentation, which is able to render science comprehensible, pertinent and fascinating for the general public'.
http://www.channel4.com/science/index.html

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Gândit in Romania (TVR2 - Romania)

This magazine programme, which goes out at noon on Saturdays, aims to inform the general public about home-grown Romanian innovations. Among other things, it promotes discoveries and inventions which have won international prizes, with a view to helping them find practical applications. For 25 minutes researchers and innovators present the conception and development of their projects. This recently launched programme already attracts about 5% of the audience.
http://www.tvr.ro/

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Horizon (BBC 2 – United Kingdom)

The BBC's flagship science programme - which has run for almost 40 years now - Horizon tackles a variety of subjects (medicine, the environment, new technologies, archaeology, etc.) and is aimed at a mass audience. The programme combines an original form of narration with a solid scientific basis and concentrates in particular on the social implications of scientific progress. Horizon goes out at nine in the evening and regularly attracts 12% of the audience or over 3 million viewers.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/horizon/

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Jota (Teleac/Not – The Netherlands)

A weekly 10-minute magazine programme aimed at the general public, Jota can be seen on the Dutch educational channel Teleac/Not. It covers a range of subjects with its resolutely educational approach, giving scientists the chance to speak for themselves, and presenting and analysing often little-known research subjects.
http://www.teleacnot.nl/sites/jota-tv/index.html

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Matière Grise (RTBF – Belgium)

First broadcast in 1998, Matière Grise goes out every five weeks on RTBF. It has become a reference in the Belgian audio-visual landscape, praised for its solid content, simple structure and dynamic presentation. Its producer and presenter Patrice Goldberg is determined that the language should be accessible to all. As a result, it regularly attracts a large audience, despite its 10.30pm slot on Thursday evenings.
http://www3.rtbf.be/rtbf_2000/bin/
view_something.cgi ?type=mendelhome&id=
0013602_mendelhome&menu=0013598_
menulist&pub=www.rtbf.portail/bad

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Nano – die Welt von morgen (3sat – Germany)

This science programme goes out daily at 6.30 in the evening. It is co-produced by German (ZDF), Austrian (ORF) and Swiss (SRG) public television and covers a wide range of subjects, often topical and always handled skilfully. It is broadcast by the 3Sat satellite channel and can also be viewed on German regional channels at various times.
http://www.3sat.de/nano.html

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Odyssée (France)

Created by TF1 and broadcast by TPS satellite, Odyssée features programmes for the initiated and uninitiated alike, seeking to satisfy the most diverse appetites for knowledge and to offer something for all tastes and interests. The fare includes documentaries on history, science, culture and contemporary life. Odyssée tries to entertain and inform, its major reports giving viewers the chance to see the world in a new light.
http://www.odyssee.com/

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Quarks & Co (WDR – Germany)

The bi-monthly Quarks & Co concentrates on natural sciences, approached from different angles but always with a concern for simplicity and the knack of finding the most fascinating aspects of a topical theme. It offers a mix of field reports and studio sequences and tries to explain science at work in our everyday lives as well as considering some of the enigmas of the universe. 'Science as entertainment' is the motto of its presenter and producer Ranga Yogeshwar – an astrophysicist and researcher at CERN – who likes to feature experiments, graphs and computer animations. His overriding aim is to make complex phenomena understandable to the widest possible audience.
http://www.quarks.de/dyn/2095.phtml

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Reportrarna (SVT – Sweden)

A bi-monthly magazine programme comprising scientific reports of interest to a wide public, Reportrama tackles major scientific issues, using a simple and direct language but always with the utmost discipline and with a penchant for investigative journalism.
http://www.svt.se/malmo/reporter/

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SuperQuark (Italy)

It was back in 1980 that Piero Angela first had the idea of creating a major science programme worthy of prime-time Italian TV. First known as Quark, then SuperQuark, the form has changed but the goal remains the same: to raise the cultural level of the viewer by offering popular science of the highest quality. The many experts who contribute to the programme confirm its credentials. From ethnology to astronomy, archaeology, electronics and psychology included, SuperQuark casts its net far and wide. From the somewhat austere set, and never losing sight of the educational aspect, Angela has succeeded in his ambitions and currently attracts a weekly audience of 4 million, or 20% of the market.
http://www.superquark.rai.it/

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Viden Om (DR – Denmark)

Every week on the Danish public channel, Viden Om presents a series of short documentaries of between two and ten minutes in length, introduced by Anja Philip. It has covered a wide range of subjects over the past three seasons, including the human body and biology, technology, space research, archaeology and palaeontology.
http://www.dr.dk/videnom/

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