Navigation path

Countries
Countries
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Finland
  France
  Gambia
  Georgia
  Germany
  Ghana
  Greece
  Hungary
  Iceland
  India
  Indonesia
  Ireland
  Israel
  Italy
  Japan
  Kazakhstan
  Kenya
  Korea
  Latvia
  Lichtenstein
  Lithuania
  Luxembourg
  Madagascar
  Malaysia
  Malta
  Mexico
  Montenegro
  Morocco
  Namibia
  Netherlands
  Nigeria
  Norway
  Panama
  Peru
  Poland
  Portugal
  Romania
  Russia
  Senegal
  Serbia
  Slovakia
  Slovenia
  South Africa
  Spain
  Sri Lanka
  Swaziland
  Sweden
  Switzerland
  Taiwan
  Tanzania
  Thailand
  Tunisia
  Turkey
  Uganda
  Ukraine
  United Kingdom
  United States
  Vietnam

Themes
Agriculture & food
Energy
Environment
ERA-NET
Health & life sciences
Human resources & mobility
Industrial research
Information society
Innovation
International cooperation
Nanotechnology
Pure sciences
Research infrastructures
Research policy
Science & business
Science in society
Security
SMEs
Social sciences and humanities
Space
Special Collections
Transport


   Countries

Last Update: 06-07-2012  
Related category(ies):
Social sciences and humanities  |  Success stories  |  Research policy

 

Countries involved in the project described in the article:
Czech Republic  |  Netherlands  |  Portugal  |  United Kingdom
Add to PDF "basket"

CSEYHP – New solutions for youth homelessness and social exclusion

Throughout European Union (EU), solving the growing problem of homeless youth is presenting serious challenges for policy-makers at the national level and social workers at the local level. The main difficulty is: how can young men and women who are socially excluded be re-integrated into society?

©Fotolia © Fotolia, 2012

The aim of a EU-funded research project on homeless youth Combating Social Exclusion Among Young Homeless Populations – or CSEYHP – was to gain in-depth comparative knowledge on the social exclusion of homeless youth and those young people at risk of becoming homeless in the Czech Republic, the Netherlands, Portugal and the UK.

CSEYHP researchers wanted to study homeless and socially excluded youth populations in different national contexts, introduce and investigate the use of various methods with NGOs that work with homeless youth, and to document the efforts of adults, peer mentors and family members to help socially excluded youth regain housing.

The researchers also developed the concepts of risk, social exclusion and shelter exclusion (both in theory and in practice). The CSEYHP project coordinator was MOVISIE, a Dutch centre for social development. Thea Meinema, MOVISIE's senior consultant for international affairs, said their work on the project concluded in April 2011 when their findings were presented at a conference in Brussels.

"Based on the work of researchers in various countries, the conclusions and recommendations we formulated will be used in future European Union policies and in national policy," Meinema said. "It is a long-term involvement."

According to research findings, poverty alone did not account for the number of homeless youth and there are no easy answers in the search for a solution. Research participants identified early intervention in the form of skills training, conflict resolution assistance and employment opportunity as key in reducing the family stresses (abuse, mental illness, poverty) and threats that lead to young people feeling that they have no choice but to live on the streets. Meeting the immediate shelter needs of the homeless youth was identified as a front-line strategy to help support them as they address the problems they face.

Individual and relational factors played a major role, with the youth's unstable family situation, lack of adequate shelter, and psychological problems being the major contributors to homelessness. To help gather data, CSEYHP researchers relied on the active participation of young homeless people as co-researchers.

"It was hard in some countries to find specific groups of young people to talk to," Meinema said. "Part of the work involved homeless youth as co-researchers who needed to be trained and kept involved in the project. They moved quite a lot and it was sometimes quite difficult to keep track of them. We depended on their involvement and their feeling of sharing in the project." She said that despite its limitations, the use of homeless youth as co-researchers had a positive effect on the findings of the study.

It would have been difficult for researchers to make such specific comparisons between the four countries because of the differences in national policies and the differences in funding opportunities, Meinema said, adding that it would not have been possible to do this kind of comprehensive project without EC funding.

The project's findings and reports (available to public at www.movisie.nl/homelessyouth) are part of a larger database within the European Commission's 7th Framework Programme, which is available to researchers, policy-makers and other interested stakeholders. This database ensures better visibility of scientific activity and resources in an easily accessed format on the Commission's website.

In addition to the Netherlands centre for social development, CSEYHP project partners included London Metropolitan University, the Centro de Investigação e Estudos De Sociologia in Lisbon, and Charles University in Prague. The EU contributed approximately € 770,000 to the study.

Project details

  • Participants: Netherlands (Coordinator),Portugal, United Kingdom, Czech Republic
  • FP7 Proj. N° 217223
  • Total costs: € 1 010 016
  • EU contribution: € 770 173
  • Duration: May 2008 - April 2011

Convert article(s) to PDF

No article selected


loading


Search articles

Notes:
To restrict search results to articles in the Information Centre, i.e. this site, use this search box rather than the one at the top of the page.

After searching, you can expand the results to include the whole Research and Innovation web site, or another section of it, or all Europa, afterwards without searching again.

Please note that new content may take a few days to be indexed by the search engine and therefore to appear in the results.

Print Version
Share this article
See also

Project web site

Project information on CORDIS

Contacts
Unit A1 - External & internal communication,
Directorate-General for Research & Innovation,
European Commission
Tel : +32 2 298 45 40
  Top   Research Information Center