Navigation path

Themes
Agriculture & food
Energy
Environment
ERA-NET
Health & life sciences
Human resources & mobility
Industrial research
Information society
Innovation
International cooperation
Nanotechnology
Pure sciences
Research infrastructures
Research policy
Science & business
Science in society
Security
SMEs
Social sciences and humanities
Space
Special Collections
Transport

Countries
Countries
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Finland
  France
  Georgia
  Germany
  Ghana
  Greece
  Hungary
  Iceland
  India
  Ireland
  Israel
  Italy
  Japan
  Kazakhstan
  Kenya
  Korea
  Latvia
  Lithuania
  Luxembourg
  Malta
  Mexico
  Montenegro
  Morocco
  Namibia
  Netherlands
  Nigeria
  Norway
  Peru
  Poland
  Portugal
  Romania
  Russia
  Senegal
  Serbia
  Slovakia
  Slovenia
  South Africa
  Spain
  Swaziland
  Sweden
  Switzerland
  Taiwan
  Tunisia
  Turkey
  Ukraine
  United Kingdom
  United States


   All

Last Update: 19-12-2012  
Related category(ies):
Health & life sciences  |  Success stories  |  Special Collections

 

Countries involved in the project described in the article:
Finland
Add to PDF "basket"

Canceromics – New technologies in cancer profiling

Advances in microarray or lab-on-a-chip technologies have significantly improved our ability to study human cells and tissues. However, in order to develop novel therapies to combat such diseases as cancer, understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms is required and this is only made possible by developing new technologies.


© Fotolia, 2012

The team at the Canceromics programme established a world class laboratory to develop unprecedented technologies for cancer profiling and analysis. It has in particular come up with cell microarray technology for the rapid functional analysis of all genes and their role in cancer.

Canceromics was a €1.8 million Marie Curie Actions (MCAs) joint research programme between the VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and the University of Turku. Started in August 2004, the four year programme was also supported by the City of Turku and its Technology Development Company, Turku Science Park Inc. Canceromics is in fact unique in that a public university and state technology research institute started a joint project with the local government.

In order to attract only the best candidates to Finland, job opportunities were published in top tier scientific journals such as Nature and Science as well as a whole host of relevant websites. The Marie-Curie grants allowed for this proactive recruitment strategy which resulted in scientists who held senior positions at major US centres of excellence returning to Europe to launch and, indeed, maintain ambitious research programmes. Canceromics is thus a prime example of mobility in action.

The programme itself was also extremely multi-disciplinary, which has helped Europe compete with major US-based centres in the field. The team's track record in setting up new technologies has also been important for the EU innovation chain.

"The biological focus driving our technology development was the identification of causative gene targets in cancer cells, which we believe will form a basis for effective development of novel anti-cancer agents," says Canceromics Project Coordinator, Prof. Olli Kallioniemi.

The integrated analysis of cancer systems biology has been the main overall goal of Canceromics. However, as Kallioniemi is eager to point out, his team, in collaboration with the host institutes, "has also established itself as a major European site for the development and application of these technologies".

"We are well on the road to generating valuable research clues on disease mechanisms, as well as starting points for drug development," says the Professor. The fact that several multinational pharmaceutical companies have also become involved in the work adds clout to his statement.

The establishment of Canceromics has been crucial for the long-term training of scientists in important fields, such as biotechnology, drug development, cancer research, genomics and bioinformatics. Overall, Canceromics has started a chain of positive developments, which continues to this day. The project has led to international recruitment, counteracted the EU brain drain, generated major public-private partnerships and above all, come up with technologies and scientific findings that help us understand and hopefully one day cure cancer.

The programme has also proven extremely beneficial to the local job economy with the vast majority of those hired under Canceromics still working in the same laboratory – many now on permanent contracts.

Project details

  • Participants:Finland(coordinator)
  • FP6 Project N° 2728
  • EU contribution: € 1 806 500
  • Duration: August 2004 to July 2008

Convert article(s) to PDF

No article selected


loading


Search articles

Notes:
To restrict search results to articles in the Information Centre, i.e. this site, use this search box rather than the one at the top of the page.

After searching, you can expand the results to include the whole Research and Innovation web site, or another section of it, or all Europa, afterwards without searching again.

Please note that new content may take a few days to be indexed by the search engine and therefore to appear in the results.

Print Version
Share this article
See also

Project information on CORDIS

Contacts
Unit A1 - External & internal communication,
Directorate-General for Research & Innovation,
European Commission
Tel : +32 2 298 45 40
  Top   Research Information Center