Facilitating public procurement of bio-based innovation

How can public authorities help to advance the bioeconomy through their purchasing decisions? An EU-funded project has produced a handbook and tools for procurers to support a shift towards greater sustainability.

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Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


  Infocentre

Published: 22 October 2019  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
EnvironmentSustainable development
Research policyHorizon 2020
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Germany  |  Netherlands  |  Poland  |  United Kingdom
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Facilitating public procurement of bio-based innovation

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© gustavofrazao #121479587 , source: adobe.stock.com 2019

The EU-funded project INNPROBIO engaged with procurers and practitioners across Europe, stimulating dialogue on public-sector purchases of biobased products and services and addressing common questions. One of its main achievements is the production of a handbook and an online decision support tool for public procurers, which offers insights into all stages of the procurement process.

‘The handbook covers all the main aspects addressed by INNPROBIO,’ says project coordinator Moritz Westkämper of FNR (Fachagentur Nachwachsende Rohstoffe e.V.), Germany’s central coordinating Agency for Renewable Resources. ‘It provides a guideline that public procurers can simply follow to create tenders in favour of biobased products and services.’

This guidance notably comprises text blocks public authorities can use to specify their requirements, which Westkämper describes as particularly helpful given the complexities and pitfalls of wording tender specifications. It draws on the various publications and tools produced by the project, all of which are freely available online. These include resources as diverse as a glossary, a series of factsheets, case studies and methodological advice.

One of the key components of the INNPROBIO toolbox is a database featuring biobased products that are already on the market. This database covers nine types of goods – such as food packaging, furniture and construction materials, for instance – and enables users to compare products within individual categories.

INNPROBIO also produced recommendations for decision-makers and standardisation bodies, highlighting barriers to overcome in order to stimulate public procurement of bio-based products and services. Like the other outputs of the project, which ended in February 2018, these findings will continue to resonate in the work of the partners who were involved in INNPROBIO, Westkämper notes.

‘Biobased products and services are crucial to our future, and the public sector can play a huge role in promoting them,’ he concludes. ‘It has a major pull factor.’

Project details

  • Project acronym: INNPROBIO
  • Participants: Germany (Coordinator), UK, Poland, Netherlands
  • Project N°: 652599
  • Total cost: €1 971 805
  • EU contribution: €1 964 868
  • Duration: March 2015 to February 2018

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