Transiting knowledge in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam

EU-funded researchers are working with counterparts in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam to help all three Southeast Asian nations boost their transition economies, among the fastest growing in the world, by developing local skills and putting knowledge into practice.

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


  Infocentre

Published: 17 October 2019  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Human resources & mobilityMarie Curie Actions
International cooperation
Research policyHorizon 2020
Social sciences and humanities
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Cambodia  |  Estonia  |  Laos  |  Switzerland  |  Vietnam
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Transiting knowledge in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam

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© kintarapong #220929917, source: adobe.stock.com 2019

University research and knowledge are key assets for any society. But applying that knowledge and skill can be tricky in countries such as Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam whose economies are in transition.

At around 7 % in recent years, their annual growth rates are among the fastest in the world. Studying how to harness knowledge to support development and create long-term prosperity in all three countries is among the key goals of the EU-funded IKID project.

The idea is relatively straightforward but complex in execution given, in part, the shift from central to market-oriented economies. That same shift, however, also presents an opportunity.

‘The transition setting provides unique momentum for advancing the regulations and institutions in those countries so that knowledge-based development is supported,’ says IKID project coordinator Aaro Hazak, a professor at the Tallinn University of Technology in Estonia.

The increased use of knowledge during a transitional phase of economic development is key to long-term sustainability and prosperity, Hazak adds. He notes it also means institutional support focused, for example, on curbing corruption or shedding unnecessary bureaucracy.

History lessons

IKID has held a number of research seminars, training events, and paper discussions to come up with tailor-made strategies. Project participants, using economic data, explored how to get people with the right skills to contribute towards knowledge development. All was underpinned by drawing on past experiences of transitional economies in Central and Eastern Europe.

Hazak says the Estonian experience of reforms in the 1990s provided essential insight into how to align institutions to support innovation, modern technology and top-notch skills.

‘It provides ample learning opportunities for the Southeast Asian countries in transition,’ he says, noting that IKID builds on the cooperation of economists and legal scholars.

That cooperation extends into Switzerland, whose knowledge economy ranks among the best in the world. The lessons from Central and Eastern Europe coupled with those from Switzerland – via the University of Lausanne – have led to the creation of an essential toolbox for Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam.

The future is bright

The hope is that the lessons learned through IKID will help advance and promote key regulations and institutions in all three countries so that knowledge-based development is strongly supported.

By enhancing institutions that promote international trade and investment opportunities, as well as creating a more environmentally friendly business setting, IKID’s impact could have global dimensions.

‘In addition to the research outcomes and policy implications resulting from the project, development of a mindset of European-Asian academic cooperation and excellence-oriented research is key,” says Hazak.

Such excellence is already being achieved. For example, the National University of Laos, an IKID partner, recently launched a PhD programme in economics.

Its scholars, who developed their research skills during secondments to the University of Lausanne and the Tallinn University of Technology under IKID, are now able to share their knowledge with doctoral students.

IKID received funding through the EU’s Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions programme.

Project details

  • Project acronym: IKID
  • Participants: Estonia, Switzerland, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia
  • Project N°: 734712
  • Total costs: € 1 318 500
  • EU contribution: € 1 318 500
  • Duration: January 2017 to December 2020

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