New processes for safer medicines

The EU-funded CORE project is helping to develop safer, more effective medicines by improving the processes pharmaceutical companies use to separate mirror-image pharmaceutical molecules, which will boost the industry's efficiency and competitiveness.

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


  Infocentre

Published: 19 July 2019  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Agriculture & foodAgriculture
Health & life sciencesDrugs & drug processes
Human resources & mobilityMarie Curie Actions
Industrial researchIndustrial processes & robotics
Innovation
Countries involved in the project described in the article
France  |  Germany  |  Netherlands  |  Romania  |  Sweden  |  United Kingdom
Add to PDF "basket"

New processes for safer medicines

Image

© Avatar_023 #155757106, source: stock.adobe.com 2019

Chiral pharmaceuticals are widely used in clinical treatments and agriculture. They include non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, β-blockers for reducing blood pressure, and herbicides and pesticides.

The EU-funded CORE project is equipping a group of 15 early-stage researchers with the tools, know-how and skills required to master resolution, which is the process used to separate chiral molecules.

The researchers are collaborating on the project with academic and industrial experts. While CORE is dedicated to research, it is also intended to encourage young scientists to develop interpersonal and organisational skills and experience. Furthermore, the industrial partners involved in the project are ensuring that the tools being developed will provide them with better, more efficient processes to separate chiral compounds.

The two enantiomers of chiral molecules are mirror images of one another, but usually only one has the intended effect since the body can distinguish between enantiomers. The other enantiomer might even have severe life-threatening side effects. Successful and efficient industrial separation of chiral pharmaceuticals is therefore of vital importance although it remains a huge industrial challenge.

The CORE network is exploring three approaches: expanding the applicability of chiral separation through crystallisation by exploring the variety of crystal forms that chiral compounds exhibit; identifying separation opportunities by developing innovative hybrid processes that combine synthesis and crystallisation; and developing continuous versions of these separation processes that will ultimately be useful to industry. The research covers the fields of chemical engineering, chemistry and applied physics.

To create awareness of the project and its usefulness to industry, the early-stage researchers organised a crystal growth competition at high schools located near the universities hosting the researchers. Pupils were judged on the most interesting and creative crystals grown.

The project is receiving funding from the EU’s Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions programme.

Project details

  • Project acronym: CORE
  • Participants: United Kingdom (Coordinator), Germany, France, Netherlands, Switzerland, Romania
  • Project N°: 722456
  • Total costs: € 3 926 004
  • EU contribution: € 3 926 004
  • Duration: October 2016 to September 2020

See also

 

Convert article(s) to PDF

No article selected


loading


Search articles

Notes:
To restrict search results to articles in the Information Centre, i.e. this site, use this search box rather than the one at the top of the page.

After searching, you can expand the results to include the whole Research and Innovation web site, or another section of it, or all Europa, afterwards without searching again.

Please note that new content may take a few days to be indexed by the search engine and therefore to appear in the results.

Print Version
Share this article
See also
Project website
Project details