Collective behaviour in the digital age

How do people behave in a world connected by technology? What mechanisms shape the actions and reactions of large groups? And how could they be explored through controlled experiments? EU-funded researchers have generated new knowledge to inform the development of a behaviour simulator.

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


  Infocentre

Published: 5 April 2019  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Information societyInformation technology
Research policyHorizon 2020
Science in societyFuture science & technology
Social sciences and humanities
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Finland  |  Netherlands  |  Spain  |  United Kingdom
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Collective behaviour in the digital age

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© Rawpixel.com #104797667, 2019 source: stock.adobe.com

A complex system, where lots of components interact, is more than the sum of its parts – its collective behaviour does not necessarily derive in a straightforward way from that of the individuals involved in it. It follows that group size matters when it comes to studying human interactions and their outcomes.

The EU-funded IBSEN project set out to conduct controlled experiments with thousands of volunteers simultaneously, and developed the methodology and tools required to do so. In a bid to advance the understanding of individual and collective behaviour in today’s connected world, the researchers hoped to pave the way towards the development of a simulator.

‘We are going to lay the foundations to start a new way of doing social science for the problems that arise in a society that is very technologically connected,’ says project coordinator Anxo Sánchez of Madrid’s University Carlos III. The ability to anticipate human behaviour would open up new possibilities in areas as varied as artificial intelligence and policymaking, economics and game design.

Institutions in Finland, the Netherlands, Spain and the United Kingdom collaborated on IBSEN, which ended in August 2018. EU funding for this three-year endeavour was contributed through a scheme specifically dedicated to ideas for radically new technologies. This type of grant is one of three streams of Horizon 2020 funding set aside for future and emerging technologies.

Project details

  • Project acronym: IBSEN
  • Participants: Spain (Coordinator), UK, Netherlands, Finland
  • Project N°: 662725
  • Total costs: € 2 663 237
  • EU contribution: € 2 663 237
  • Duration: September 2015 to August 2018

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