Light-sensitive molecules for new disease therapies

Peptidomimetics are small molecules that mimic short natural proteins - peptides - and produce the same effects as their natural counterparts. An EU-funded project is developing peptidomimetics that can alternate between biologically active and inactive forms when exposed to light. The technique could lead to new light-controlled drugs which can be turned off and on when needed to treat cancers and other diseases.

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


  Infocentre

Published: 4 March 2019  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Health & life sciencesBiotechnology  |  Communicable diseases  |  Drugs & drug processes  |  Major diseases  |  Molecular biology
Innovation
International cooperation
Pure sciencesBiology
Research policyHorizon 2020
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Germany  |  Latvia  |  Ukraine  |  United Kingdom
Add to PDF "basket"

Light-sensitive molecules for new disease therapies

Image

© ipopba #205999518, 2019 source: stock.adobe.com

Peptides are vital for the biological functioning of virtually every known organism. Peptidomimetics are compounds that mimic a natural peptide and can interact with a biological target to produce a desired biological effect.

The EU-funded PELICO project is developing peptidomimetics that can switch between two forms: either biologically inactive or biologically active when exposed to light of specific wavelengths.

The compounds can be irradiated with physiologically benign red light and converted to biologically active form when they are within disease lesions, for example, in tumours. This can be achieved with a very high level of precision, enabling a highly targeted and clearly delineated application of the active peptidomimetics to cure localised diseases.

The PELICO team is carrying out work in four main areas. First, the project is carrying out pharmacokinetic and toxicity studies of photo-controlled peptidomimetics synthesised under previous research. Second, novel photo-controlled building blocks are being evaluated to ascertain their compatibility with peptides. Then, new photo-controlled peptidomimetics are being created, based on these novel building blocks.

Finally, PELICO researchers are undergoing multidisciplinary training. This will enable them to carry out further work on the development of the most advanced photo-controlled peptidomimetics, to be used as drugs in targeted therapeutic approaches.

PELICO researchers believe this new approach represents a real breakthrough in the design, synthesis and application of peptide analogues. Initial testing is being carried out with a special emphasis on antimicrobial and cancer treatments.

The project was funded through the EU’s Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellowship programme. .

Project details

  • Project acronym: PELICO
  • Participants: Ukraine (Coordinator), Germany, Latvia, UK
  • Project N°: 690973
  • Total costs: € 688 500
  • EU contribution: € 688 500
  • Duration: January 2016 to December 2019

See also

 

Convert article(s) to PDF

No article selected


loading


Search articles

Notes:
To restrict search results to articles in the Information Centre, i.e. this site, use this search box rather than the one at the top of the page.

After searching, you can expand the results to include the whole Research and Innovation web site, or another section of it, or all Europa, afterwards without searching again.

Please note that new content may take a few days to be indexed by the search engine and therefore to appear in the results.

Print Version
Share this article
See also
Project website
Project details