Preventing parasites with new vaccines

Preventing parasites in poultry, cattle and other livestock is a major concern for Europe's farmers. As current treatments prove less effective or desirable, EU-funded scientists are working on new vaccines to keep animals healthy and safeguard our food supply.

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


  Infocentre

Published: 21 February 2019  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Agriculture & foodAnimal health and welfare  |  Food safety & health risks
Research policyHorizon 2020
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Belgium  |  China  |  Germany  |  Ireland  |  Norway  |  Spain  |  United Kingdom
Add to PDF "basket"

Preventing parasites with new vaccines

Image

© Moonborne #180061581, 2019 source: stock.adobe.com

Poultry and livestock farming faces a constant threat of parasite infestation, which is typically targeted by widespread use of drugs that have led to resistance and reduced effectiveness. Coupled with changing regulations on chemical use, as well as a growing consumer preference for organic food, the pressure is on to find alternatives to keep livestock parasite-free and maximise food production.

Vaccines are the primary focus of the EU-funded PARAGONE project. Developing effective ones has proven difficult in the past due to the parasites’ ability to modulate or adapt to host immune responses, resulting in a range of problems. For example, external parasites like red mites in poultry cause severe irritation, stress and poor egg production. Such mites can also carry viruses and bacteria, which cause illness in hens.

Mite infestations in cattle, leading to potentially severe skin disease, can also result in production losses and animal stress. Current treatment options are not straightforward and failure to kill the mites can lead to prolonged diseases.

Know your foe

PARAGONE scientists are seeking to better understand the effects of parasites like worms infesting the stomachs, intestines and livers of cattle and other ruminant livestock, with a view to developing and eventually commercialising effective vaccines and methods for delivering them.

The project is studying how worms and mites spread and what they do once in or on an animal. Stopping these pathogens has proven problematic in the past because they release molecules that suppress immune responses, which any new vaccine would need to overcome in order to work effectively.

For this, detailed research programmes and immunology studies are taking place in Europe and South America to ensure that new vaccines could knock out parasites with different characteristics in different regions.

Project details

  • Project acronym: PARAGONE
  • Participants: United Kingdom (Coordinator), Ireland, Spain, Norway, Uruguay, Belgium, Germany
  • Project N°: 635408
  • Total costs: € 8 998 559
  • EU contribution: € 8 998 559
  • Duration: April 2015 to March 2019

See also

 

Convert article(s) to PDF

No article selected


loading


Search articles

Notes:
To restrict search results to articles in the Information Centre, i.e. this site, use this search box rather than the one at the top of the page.

After searching, you can expand the results to include the whole Research and Innovation web site, or another section of it, or all Europa, afterwards without searching again.

Please note that new content may take a few days to be indexed by the search engine and therefore to appear in the results.

Print Version
Share this article
See also
Project website
Project details