Seeking the seeds of tolerance in religious strife

Disinterested scholarship was able to unfold once rival religious denominations' rules and positions had been established in the 16th and 17th centuries, according to EU-funded research. Such scholarship, in turn, helped to generate greater religious tolerance - a mechanism that could inform ways to improve acceptance of diversity.

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Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


  Infocentre

Published: 4 January 2019  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Cultural Heritage
Human resources & mobilityMarie Curie Actions
Social sciences and humanities
Countries involved in the project described in the article
United Kingdom
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Seeking the seeds of tolerance in religious strife

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© Zerbor, #98249788, 2019. source: stock.adobe.com

The EU-funded project HISTHEOL explored the advent of disinterested scholarship from “dogmatic stalemate”. To elucidate this aspect, it studied history writing from a period of 15 decades beginning in 1517, the year in which Martin Luther’s published the Ninety-five Theses that were to initiate the Reformation. The analysis focused on the working methods of selected authors from England, Germany and the Italian peninsula.

Once the opposing denominations’ respective rules and positions were firmly in place, scholars benefited from a certain leeway to conduct research within this framework and across religious divides, the HISTHEOL team notes.

This development, the researchers add, created scope to approach change and diversity as historical facts rather than issues to settle, enabling authors to let these differences become part of their narratives and thereby paving the way for greater acceptance.

HISTHEOL received funding from the EU’s Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions programme for a two-year fellowship hosted by the University of York. The project, which ended in August 2017, sought to provide a fresh, historical narrative to bolster the case for mutual recognition and appreciation of diversity in religious debate.

Fellow Stefan Bauer worked on the project with Simon Ditchfield, the scientist in charge of HISTHEOL at the University of York.

In 2016 Bauer and Bethany Hume, also from the University of York, launched an interactive online exhibition “The Art of Disagreeing Badly: Religious Dispute in Early Modern Europe”.

Project details

  • Project acronym: HISTHEOL
  • Participants: United Kingdom (Coordinator)
  • Project N°: 655541
  • Total costs: € 183 454
  • EU contribution: € 183 454
  • Duration: September 2015 to August 2017

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