Paving the way for safer roads in Africa

Shifting into high gear, EU-funded researchers are driving a new Action Plan to make roads safer in Africa.

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


  Infocentre

Published: 31 July 2018  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Research policyHorizon 2020
TransportRoad
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Belgium  |  France  |  Greece  |  Italy  |  Netherlands  |  Portugal  |  Sweden  |  Switzerland  |  United Kingdom
Add to PDF "basket"

Paving the way for safer roads in Africa

Image

© Daniel #209227495, source: fotolia.com 2018

As a continent, Africa has some of the most lethal roads in the world. A lack of road safety protocols, wanting road conditions and poor post-crash emergency response systems make for alarmingly high fatality rates.

To help turn this around, the EU-funded project SaferAfrica is driving policies aimed at improving road safety.

“Europe can play an important role by supporting African countries in improving road safety and achieving the Action Plan targets [African Road Safety Action Plan 2011-2020],” says project coordinator Luca Persia, Director of The Centre for Transport and Logistics (CTL) of Sapienza, University of Rome. “In this view, the project aims at building favourable conditions and opportunities for the effective implementation of road safety actions in African countries by setting up a Dialogue Platform between Africa and Europe.”

According to data from the World Health Organization (WHO), Africa has fewer than 5000 cars for every 100 000 people. In Europe, the ratio is about 48 000:100 000. But the chance of dying in a road traffic crash in Africa is almost three times higher than in Europe ((26.6% fatality rate per 100 000 inhabitants per year versus 9.6%).

These figures suggest that Africa urgently needs to seek different ways to cut the risk of road traffic accidents, and take advantage of available experience. EU knowhow can contribute here.

As explained by Persia, SaferAfrica is supporting national and local governments in Africa to better understand current weaknesses and country needs in road safety management.

“Based on international methodologies, road safety and traffic management capacity reviews at the country level were carried out in three African countries, namely: Cameroon, Tunisia and Kenya. The activities are ongoing in Burkina Faso and South Africa,” he says.

Driving change in Burkina Faso

Road accidents are an almost-daily occurrence in the landlocked country of Burkina Faso, where travelling by road is the primary means of getting around.

Involved in the SaferAfrica project from its inception, Burkina Faso is a member of the project’s Stakeholders group. The country’s National Office for Road Safety (ONASER) participates in consultations and interacts with stakeholders from other countries.

Burkina Faso was also selected to participate in the Road Safety Management Capacity Review as a country representative for the West Africa Region.

A collection of stakeholder views about current approaches (strengths and weaknesses), this review will result in an expert road safety management opinion about the scope for further multi-sectoral actions in the country. Recommendations will be based on national and international good practice, and will have a focus on sustainability.

Persia expects the review to provide “a useful management tool for road safety policy-makers and managers”. “A preliminary inception report already shared with the country stakeholders and policy-makers suggests that several issues affect the various road safety management functions, among others: lack of manpower, lack of training, and weak financial means,” says Persia.

Before the project ends, the partners will seek to reach a consensus between the different stakeholders and agencies involved as to the next steps.

Green light for improvement

Launched in 2016, SaferAfrica has already celebrated many important achievements.

“The most prominent one is the two-level Dialogue Platform [DP],” notes Persia. “The Institutional level of the DP comprises representatives of existing institutions and competent authorities at the country and continent levels tackling regulatory, financing and planning issues in the different fields involved in road safety.”

The second level is technical, comprising both African and European government and research institutions, international institutions and non-governmental organisations.

Another important milestone is the development of the African Road Safety Observatory, which Persia regards as one of the project’s most important outcomes.

This web-based portal has a double function: supporting the activities of the DP and providing users access to the latest statistics and reports related to road safety and traffic management in Africa.

A third important step, according to Persia, is the core of the project’s Capacity Building pillar. To be rolled out later this year, it will involve the creation of an e-learning tool, available in English, French and Portuguese, designed for road safety experts in Africa.

Project details

  • Project acronym: SAFERAFRICA
  • Participants: Italy (Coordinator), Greece, Belgium, Switzerland, France, UK, Portugal, Netherlands, Sweden, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon
  • Project N°: 724029
  • Total costs: € 2 998 025
  • EU contribution: € 2 844 275
  • Duration: From October 2016 to September 2019

See also

 

Convert article(s) to PDF

No article selected


loading


Search articles

Notes:
To restrict search results to articles in the Information Centre, i.e. this site, use this search box rather than the one at the top of the page.

After searching, you can expand the results to include the whole Research and Innovation web site, or another section of it, or all Europa, afterwards without searching again.

Please note that new content may take a few days to be indexed by the search engine and therefore to appear in the results.

Print Version
Share this article
See also
Project website
Project details