E-health solutions to support cancer rehabilitation

Active rehabilitation has emerged as a powerful tool in cancer care. However, its full potential to help restore survivors' functional capacity, boost their quality of life and possibly even reduce the risk of recurrence has yet to be tapped. EU-funded researchers are looking into e-health solutions to take the technique another step further.

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Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


  Infocentre

Published: 25 May 2018  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Health & life sciencesMajor diseases
Human resources & mobilityMarie Curie Actions
Research policyHorizon 2020
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Denmark  |  Ireland  |  Spain
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E-health solutions to support cancer rehabilitation

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© Stanislau_V #196862399 , 2018. Source: fotolia.com

The CATCH project is exploring connected health – a health management model underpinned by technology to link up patients and doctors, in particular to deliver services remotely – as a weapon in the fight against cancer.

More specifically, it is focusing on ways of using technology to boost patients’ functional capacity and quality of life. Innovation in this area could notably benefit people undergoing long-term treatment for cancers that are unlikely to go into remission, but in whom the progression of the disease can be halted or significantly delayed.

As a result of medical advances in recent decades, survival rates have also improved for various forms of cancer that cannot be cured, with some now perceived as chronic conditions rather than fatal illnesses.

Activity in the project ranges from studies of patients’ needs and perceptions to research into the commercialisation of e-health products, via work on aspects as varied as fostering mental wellbeing and adherence to physical exercise regimens, the development of gamification strategies, and the potential of neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

In total, eight early-stage researchers are conducting work on individual topics, supported by a project consortium that involves eleven partners in six countries. Funding for this training network led by University College Dublin is provided by the EU’s Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions ITN programme.

Project details

  • Project acronym: CATCH
  • Participants: Ireland (Coordinator), Spain, Denmark, France, The Netherlands, Belgium
  • Project N°: 722012
  • Total costs: € 2 120 806
  • EU contribution: € 2 120 806
  • Duration: September 2016 to August 2020

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