Multi-angle picture of urban segregation and mobility

An EU-funded project explored how political, spatial and social factors shape segregation and mobility in two contrasting national contexts: Sweden and Israel. A new transport modelling tool, published findings and a film are helping to inform policymakers.

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


  Infocentre

Published: 23 May 2018  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Human resources & mobilityCareers & mobility  |  Marie Curie Actions
Research policyHorizon 2020
Countries involved in the project described in the article
United Kingdom
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Multi-angle picture of urban segregation and mobility

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© Tata Chen - fotolia.com

Over half of the world’s population lives in urban settlements and, according to the UN, that figure could rise to 60 % by 2030. Rapid urbanisation can present new opportunities, but also challenges including growing social division, violence and unrest – particularly in cities where segregation along ethno-nationalist lines is growing.

The EU-funded Contested Urbanism project is helping urban and transport planners to understand the social and spatial inequalities arising from these ‘contested’ urban settings. The researchers developed rich models to map where divisions occur in cities, taking into account different socio-economic, ethnic, religious and racial factors.

Models tell the story

The lead researchers at the centre of the project, funded through the EU’s Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellowship programme, were Jonathan Rokem and Laura Vaughan, both from University College London’s Space Syntax Lab, Bartlett School of Architecture.

They examined the effect of national-level planning by comparing political and welfare policies in Sweden and Israel. They also investigated how individual perception, local communities and civil society shape these processes.

The analysis looked very closely at public transport in Jerusalem and Stockholm, measuring the likely impact of transport planning on end-users from different ethnic and social backgrounds.

This resulted in a new tool for modelling transport vulnerability and strategic policymaking in cities that factors in mobility, accessibility and the potential for cross-group encounters.

Contested Urbanism’s multi-angle picture of urban segregation and mobility has prompted valuable debate in academic and policymaking circles. The project highlights that issues of mobility and presence in public space are important for understanding segregation – in contrast to a more static, residential-based approach traditionally found in urban studies and planning literature.

The team produced a film, ‘Learning from Jerusalem’, to analyse some of the main changes in Jerusalem’s recent history. The film uses ‘space syntax’ methods – graph-based mathematical analysis of networks. It captures the city’s shifting borders, politics, demography, religion, planning and public transport.

The project’s results are supported by several scientific publications in journals such as Urban Studies, Interventions in Urban Geopolitics, and a contribution to the ‘Jerusalem’ section of Wiley-Blackwell’s 2018 Encyclopaedia of Urban and Regional Studies.

Project details

  • Project acronym: Contested Urbanism
  • Participants: United Kingdom (Coordinator)
  • Project N°: 658742
  • Total costs: € 195 454
  • EU contribution: € 195 454
  • Duration: April 2015 to March 2017

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