Fresh search for a vaccine against malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax

Hundreds of millions of people each year are infected with Plasmodium vivax, the most widespread form of malaria worldwide. An EU-funded project is tackling the mosquito-borne parasite, leading cutting-edge research efforts to accelerate the development of effective vaccines.

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


  Infocentre

Published: 25 April 2018  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Health & life sciencesCommunicable diseases  |  Drugs & drug processes  |  Major diseases  |  Medical research  |  Public health
Research policyHorizon 2020
Special CollectionsMalaria
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Denmark  |  France  |  Sweden  |  United Kingdom
Add to PDF "basket"

Fresh search for a vaccine against malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax

Image

© Helmut - fotolia.com

The MULTIVIVAX project, coordinated by the Jenner Institute at the University of Oxford in the UK, is addressing critical research bottlenecks that have hindered the discovery and development of potential vaccines for Plasmodium vivax.

The parasite accounts for up to 400 million clinical cases of malaria each year among the 2.5 billion people living in at risk areas of Latin America, Oceania and Asia. Though less virulent and deadly than Plasmodium falciparum, infections of Plasmodium vivax can cause high fever, organ dysfunction and death as they spread through the body in the blood after reproducing in the liver.

Debilitating symptoms can often reoccur months or years later due to the parasite’s ability to remain dormant in the liver for long periods of time, making it undetectable in blood tests.

This prolonged dormancy is not well understood yet – one of several factors that have hindered development of an effective vaccine, causing studies into vaccine candidates for Plasmodium vivax to lag behind research focused on Plasmodium falciparum.

The MULTIVIVAX team aims to overcome these challenges, including by developing novel transgenic parasites to generate long-term laboratory cultures that will enable effective in-vitro screening for potential vaccine.

The researchers will also develop a safe, controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) model for Plasmodium vivax. CHMI is a technique for safely conducting clinical studies to provide an early indication of vaccine efficacy in humans.

The researchers will use the CHMI model to help identify novel antigens, molecules capable of inducing an immune response in humans, associated with protective blood-stage immunity.

The work, which will leverage the latest antigen discovery and vaccine development techniques, will also contribute to progress on existing vaccine research using the most promising antigens to enhance the human body’s immune response to the detection of Plasmodium vivax at both the transmission and blood infection stages.

Project details

  • Project acronym: MULTIVIVAX
  • Participants: UK (Coordinator), France, Denmark, Sweden
  • Project N°: 733073
  • Total costs: € 5 763 405
  • EU contribution: € 5 058 974
  • Duration: January 2017 to December 2021

See also

 

Convert article(s) to PDF

No article selected


loading


Search articles

Notes:
To restrict search results to articles in the Information Centre, i.e. this site, use this search box rather than the one at the top of the page.

After searching, you can expand the results to include the whole Research and Innovation web site, or another section of it, or all Europa, afterwards without searching again.

Please note that new content may take a few days to be indexed by the search engine and therefore to appear in the results.

Print Version
Share this article
See also
Project website
Project details