Networking for EU wine production

The popping of corks and glugging of a good wine may not be at threat just yet, but if the diseases threatening Europe's vineyards have their way, they could be. EU-funded researchers therefore have very good reason to network around wine - they are building a knowledge bank to help vineyard owners protect their crops and keep the wine flowing.

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Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
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Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


  Infocentre

Published: 22 November 2017  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Agriculture & foodAgriculture
Research policyHorizon 2020
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Croatia  |  France  |  Germany  |  Hungary  |  Italy  |  Portugal  |  Spain
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Networking for EU wine production

Bottle of wine two glasses and the barrel on the table

© Jag_cz - fotolia.com

The EU is the world’s biggest wine producer, accounting for 60 % of world production, and €6 billion annually in trade. These figures have however been put at risk by diseases causing untold harm to Europe’s previous vineyards.

When asked by the EU-funded WINETWORK project consortium to identify priorities for the wine research and innovation agenda, wine-growers, scientists and decision-makers were quick to identify two particularly nasty menaces: grapevine trunk diseases (GTD) and flavescence dorée, a bacterial disease. Both are present across Europe, posing a threat to the economic viability of the entire sector.

GTD is an umbrella term comprising three specific diseases which all lead to the death of the vine after withering. Flavescence dorée affects the yields of a vine, and eventually leads to its death. When an infected vine is identified, it must be destroyed to limit the spread of the disease. This can be a huge economic loss for the vineyard owner.

WINETWORK is collecting and compiling knowledge coming from European research and the innovative and sustainable approaches already used by wine-growers in seven countries to fight these two diseases. The team is synthesising, tailoring and translating the best practices collected, and making them fully accessible via a knowledge reservoir.

The information is accessible to everyone online, and disseminated to stakeholders across Europe in the form of technical data sheets, flyers, videos, newsletters and publications.

The team will also identify the most efficient path for transferring such knowledge to relevant end-users in the hope that the methodology could be applied to other agricultural sectors.

The project will use the network created to develop a research and innovation agenda for increasing the productivity and sustainability of the European wine industry at large.

Project details

  • Project acronym: WINETWORK
  • Participants: France (Coordinator), Germany, Spain, Croatia, Hungary, Italy, Portugal
  • Project N°: 652601
  • Total costs: € 1 999 471
  • EU contribution: € 1 999 221
  • Duration: April 2015 to September 2017

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