Making science sexy for teenagers

With demand for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) graduates far outstripping supply in Europe, the EU-funded STEM4youth project is taking these subjects back to the classroom, along with a dose of fun, to show teenagers that science can be sexy, and that it is central to many careers, from marketing analyst to ethics expert and zoologist.

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


  Infocentre

Published: 21 November 2017  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Human resources & mobilityCareers & mobility  |  Training
Research policyHorizon 2020
Science in societyEducation & popular sciences  |  Education & popular sciences
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Czech Republic  |  Greece  |  Italy  |  Poland  |  Slovenia  |  Spain
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Making science sexy for teenagers

People with raised hands

© Sergey Nivens - fotolia.com

The project is organising courses in seven subjects (chemistry, physics, citizen science, engineering, medicine, maths and astronomy), putting emphasis of how the core principles of each discipline arise in everyday life.

Basic explanations are combined with hands-on experiments and activities as well as games, critical thinking sessions and insights into how the skills acquired fit with possible career choices. The course on medicine, for example, begins with a recap of what most people have already learned at school and then digs deeper into personalised cures and intelligent drugs that are designed to take out unhealthy cells without affecting the healthy ones.

The course then moves onto next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics, looking at the impact of big data analysis for medicine and the IT skills needed to perform this.

An open-source education platform also enables teachers and students to both upload and download course material, and to interact with others through games and online tests. The team will also develop a multidisciplinary guide for teachers on how best to exploit STEM subjects, including through extra-curricular activities.

A quick look at student numbers shows how far Europe is lagging behind other regions when it comes to STEM graduates. In Asia, an impressive 20 % of the student population studies a STEM subject; in Europe the figure is just 2 %.

Project details

  • Project acronym: STEM4youth
  • Participants: Poland (Coordinator), Greece, Slovenia, Italy, Czech Republic, Spain
  • Project N°: 710577
  • Total costs: € 1 776 936
  • EU contribution: € 1 776 936
  • Duration: May 2016 to October 2018

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