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   Infocentre

Published: 14 November 2017  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Health & life sciencesMedical research
Research policyHorizon 2020
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Belgium  |  France  |  Germany  |  Ireland  |  Spain  |  Switzerland  |  United Kingdom
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Saving lives with a new liver dialysis device

New technology could soon revolutionise the treatment of liver failure: an innovative dialysis device is currently being trialled. It aims to greatly improve the outlook for patients, helping them to recover or supporting them while they wait for a transplant, say the EU-funded researchers taking this innovation forward.

Image of hands holding virtual liver

© natali_mis - fotolia.com

The ALIVER project is conducting clinical trials of Dialive, a dialysis device designed to help tackle acute-on-chronic liver failure – cases where the acute condition unfolds on a backdrop of chronic liver disease. The partners involved in this endeavour plan to obtain approval for commercialisation of the device in the EU before the project ends in September 2020.

Liver failure currently claims an estimated 170 000 lives per year in Europe, the partners note, and liver disease is generally on the rise. With Dialive, the ALIVER team specifically targets situations where transplantation is currently the only option and the chances of definitive treatment are therefore dependent on organ availability.

In contrast with existing liver dialysis machines, the partners note, Dialive will restore the function of albumin, a protein that notably plays a role in detoxification. The process is designed to replace impaired albumin with a functional supply and remove toxins that have accumulated in the blood. It is proposed as a way to give the damaged liver a chance to regenerate or, if no such recovery can occur, to help preserve patients’ lives until they can benefit from an organ donation.

A first clinical trial involving 24 patients is already under way. A second one, for which the partners hope to enrol more than 100 patients, is due to begin in 2018.

The ALIVER consortium, which is led by University College London, also intends to assess the health economic benefits associated with its innovation and develop a reimbursement strategy.

Yaqrit, one of the ALIVER consortium partners, is the licensee of DIALIVE.

Project details

  • Project acronym: Aliver
  • Participants: United Kingdom (Coordinator), Belgium, Switzerland, Germany, Spain, France, Ireland
  • Project N°: 733057
  • Total costs: € 7 846 088
  • EU contribution: € 6 478 737
  • Duration: January 2017 to September 2020

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Countries
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  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
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  Gambia
  Georgia