Navigation path

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  Gambia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  Gambia
  Georgia


   Infocentre

Published: 8 August 2017  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
EnvironmentCultural heritage
Research policyHorizon 2020
Science in society
Social sciences and humanities
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Austria  |  Czech Republic  |  France  |  Germany  |  Latvia  |  Lithuania  |  Netherlands  |  Poland  |  United Kingdom
Add to PDF "basket"

Embracing the children born of war

The war ends, the foreign soldiers depart, and some may well be leaving babies behind... Whether the father was friend or foe, the local women to whom these children are born often raise them in difficult circumstances. An EU-funded research project is shedding new light on an age-old phenomenon, with the aim of providing information that could feed into policies to help them.

Silhouette refugee mother with a baby

© Prazis - fotolia.com

Do children born of war integrate into society – and if so, how? What do their experiences reveal about their communities’ perception and recollections of the war? Do authorities or policymakers strive to facilitate their integration? The CHIBOW project is dedicated to the local offspring of armed incomers in a bid to advance understanding of their situation.

It’s an issue that has largely been ignored, the partners note. While a number of studies have been carried out, these have not resonated beyond this very specific field, they observe. As a consequence, the outcomes have not fed into the creation of development tools.

CHIBOW is striving to tackle this problem. It is supporting the work of 15 early stage researchers, whom it intends to help hone the skills needed to communicate across sectoral barriers and inform the development of policy that could benefit war-affected children.

Studies within the project explore aspects of up to four main themes: ‘Children, conflict and memory’, ‘Children, education and citizenship’ and ‘Children and community’, and an exploration of experiences in a historical context. These headings cover topics as varied as gender-based violence, the construction of memory, and the responses of diaspora communities.

The project is backed by the European Commission’s Marie Skłodowska-Curie programme as part of its innovative training network (ITN) scheme, which is designed to help foster a new generation of researchers. Launched in March 2015, CHIBOW involves 12 academic partners from 9 countries, led in this four-year endeavour by the University of Birmingham.

Project details

  • Project acronym: CHIBOW
  • Participants: UK (Coordinator), Germany, France, Latvia, Poland, Lithuania, Czech Republic, Austria, Netherlands
  • Project N°: 642571
  • Total costs: € 3 729 290
  • EU contribution: € 3 729 290
  • Duration: March 2015 to February 2019

See also

 

Convert article(s) to PDF

No article selected


loading


Search articles

Notes:
To restrict search results to articles in the Information Centre, i.e. this site, use this search box rather than the one at the top of the page.

After searching, you can expand the results to include the whole Research and Innovation web site, or another section of it, or all Europa, afterwards without searching again.

Please note that new content may take a few days to be indexed by the search engine and therefore to appear in the results.

Print Version
Share this article
See also
Project website
Project details
Project video


  Top   Research Information Center
 
Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  Gambia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  Gambia
  Georgia