Navigation path

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  Gambia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  Gambia
  Georgia


   Infocentre

Published: 27 July 2017  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Health & life sciences
Research policySeventh Framework Programme
Science in society
Social sciences and humanities
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Belgium  |  Cyprus  |  Denmark  |  Estonia  |  Finland  |  Germany  |  Hungary  |  Italy  |  Netherlands  |  Spain  |  Sweden  |  United Kingdom
Add to PDF "basket"

Weighing the evidence: insights from European childhood obesity study

Child obesity is not a challenge families can tackle on their own, say EU-funded researchers. Following a five-year study involving thousands of children, they conclude that governments must do more to help.

Picture of small girl with two donuts

© iko - fotolia.com

The I.Family study has taken the measure of Europe’s plus-sized kids. In February 2017, it presented its findings on the wide variety of factors that are compromising our offspring’s chances of maintaining a healthy weight. Controlling these factors is not a challenge parents should be left to face on their own, the partners note.

I.Family followed in the footsteps of an earlier project, which had involved surveys of children in eight EU countries. It reassessed nearly 10 000 of these children several years on, at a time where they were entering into adolescence, in a bid to shed more light on the biological, behavioural, social and environmental aspects relevant to diet and health.

What can be done to tip the scales in favour of healthier weights? While there can be no one-size-fits-all solution, measures addressing the various influences and risk factors involved could go a long way.

Key findings from the I.Family project notably include the observations that the food consumed by Europe’s young is too rich, and that children spend too much time sitting in front of a television or computer screen, where they are exposed to the marketing pressure of unhealthy foods. The bulk of what our children eat is made up of foodstuffs that are nearly twice as calorific as those that might form the basis of a balanced diet. Moreover, most children are far less active than the World Health Organization recommends.

While parents can attempt to foster more appropriate choices, other aspects may be well beyond their reach. Decisions to build a park or a playground, for example, are not taken at household level, and yet the availability of suitable open spaces helps to encourage physical activity.

There are many ways for authorities to act, and the project’s conclusions provide plenty of inspiration. “Government intervention is vital if we are to stem the tide of obesity across Europe and beyond,” says I.Family coordinator Wolfgang Ahrens of the University of Bremen and the Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Germany.

Project details

  • Project acronym: I.FAMILY
  • Participants: Germany (Coordinator), Italy, Denmark, UK, Sweden, Finland, Spain, Hungary, Netherlands, Cyprus, Estonia, Belgium
  • Project N°: 266044
  • Total costs: € 11 584 021
  • EU contribution: € 9 000 000
  • Duration: March 2012 to February 2017

See also

 

Convert article(s) to PDF

No article selected


loading


Search articles

Notes:
To restrict search results to articles in the Information Centre, i.e. this site, use this search box rather than the one at the top of the page.

After searching, you can expand the results to include the whole Research and Innovation web site, or another section of it, or all Europa, afterwards without searching again.

Please note that new content may take a few days to be indexed by the search engine and therefore to appear in the results.

Print Version
Share this article
See also
Project website
Project details


  Top   Research Information Center
 
Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  Gambia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  Gambia
  Georgia