Navigation path

Themes
Agriculture & food
Energy
Environment
ERA-NET
Health & life sciences
Human resources & mobility
Industrial research
Information society
Innovation
International cooperation
Nanotechnology
Pure sciences
Research infrastructures
Research policy
Science & business
Science in society
Security
SMEs
Social sciences and humanities
Space
Special Collections
Transport

Countries
Countries
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Finland
  France
  Georgia
  Germany
  Ghana
  Greece
  Hungary
  Iceland
  India
  Ireland
  Israel
  Italy
  Japan
  Kazakhstan
  Kenya
  Korea
  Latvia
  Lithuania
  Luxembourg
  Malta
  Mexico
  Montenegro
  Morocco
  Namibia
  Netherlands
  Nigeria
  Norway
  Peru
  Poland
  Portugal
  Romania
  Russia
  Senegal
  Serbia
  Slovakia
  Slovenia
  South Africa
  Spain
  Swaziland
  Sweden
  Switzerland
  Taiwan
  Tunisia
  Turkey
  Ukraine
  United Kingdom
  United States


   Infocentre

Last Update: 04-11-2013  
Related category(ies):
Success stories  |  Science in society

 

Countries involved in the project described in the article:
Austria  |  Belgium  |  Czech Republic  |  Denmark  |  Estonia  |  Finland  |  Germany  |  Israel  |  Italy  |  Netherlands  |  Portugal  |  Slovenia  |  Spain  |  Sweden  |  Switzerland  |  United Kingdom
Add to PDF "basket"

Helping students understand the importance of science and technology

From biotechnology to digital media, from energy to cloud computing, almost every job area today is strongly affected, if not entirely reshaped, by scientific and technological advancements. Still, according to surveys, young people in developed countries do not place a high value on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

©  Shutterstock

The EU-funded project ECB ('European Coordinating Body in Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths Education') is addressing the current need to increase pupils’ interest in, and understanding of, STEM education and career paths.

"Key findings from the ROSE Project show that pupils in wealthy countries are not enthusiastic about science in school," says Alexa Joyce, Senior Manager for Corporate Development at European Schoolnet. "They think learning about science and technology isn't important or doesn't increase their career chances."

The European Coordinating Body in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, now dubbed 'inGenious', represents a large-scale, strategic response to the EU call to reinforce links between science education and science and technology careers

"European Schoolnet and the European Round Table of industrialists (ERT) have launched inGenious to bring school and industry together," Alexa says, "in order to help pupils understand the link between their passions, the set of skills which make them possible, the education paths leading to those skills, and ultimately the jobs that they could perform."

The project has set up an academic and industrial community on STEM education, open to all interested science teachers and business professionals in Europe. Community members have free access to teaching resources developed in collaboration with industry to provide a real-life context to STEM subjects in class.

"They can also participate in training events, including webinars and forums, and they can consult a catalogue of collaborative activities, from visits to industry premises to presentations by role models."

Alexa says inGenious is also running a pilot exercise, managed by Agueda Gras-Velazquez, Science Programme Manager at European Schoolnet, now entering its third year, with over 150 teachers chosen each year to participate in a more rigorous testing and evaluation of industry science activities. "Their feedback is essential to understand the main challenges as well as transferability opportunities," she says.

The results of the project are also feeding into policy activities, with inGenious actively promoting debate about STEM, mutual learning and transfer of experiences, with publications, conferences and other events at both national and European levels.

"The outcomes of our pilot activities have just been presented at the ESERA conference in Cyprus, and contribute to shedding light on the factors affecting pupils' education and career choices," says Alexa. "Among the main findings – interest in science education does not imply interest in STEM as a concrete career choice. On the other hand, talking about careers in class can make a difference. Pupils exposed to career-related discussions are, on average, 20 percent more interested in STEM careers."

So far, between 12 000 and 16 000 students have been directly engaged in the piloting exercise. Alexa says a new school competition open to all interested schools will be launched this autumn. "In the long term, we hope to help build a larger and more talented STEM workforce to promote innovation-led growth in Europe."

ECB received about EUR 3.5 million in EU funding under the FP7-SIS programme and is jointly run by European Schoolnet and the European Round table of industrialists (ERT). ECB will be completed in 2014.

Project details

  • Project acronym: ECB
  • Participants: Belgium (Coordinator), Finland, United Kingdom, Italy, Germany, Denmark, Spain, Slovenia, Sweden, Portugal, Israel, Netherlands, Estonia, Austria, Switzerland, Czech Republic
  • Project FP7 266622
  • Total costs: €8 134 000
  • EU contribution: €3 578 912
  • Duration: February 2011 - January 2014

Convert article(s) to PDF

No article selected


loading


Search articles

Notes:
To restrict search results to articles in the Information Centre, i.e. this site, use this search box rather than the one at the top of the page.

After searching, you can expand the results to include the whole Research and Innovation web site, or another section of it, or all Europa, afterwards without searching again.

Please note that new content may take a few days to be indexed by the search engine and therefore to appear in the results.

Print Version
Share this article
See also

Project web site
Project information on CORDIS





  Top   Research Information Center