Navigation path

Themes
Agriculture & food
Energy
Environment
ERA-NET
Health & life sciences
Human resources & mobility
Industrial research
Information society
Innovation
International cooperation
Nanotechnology
Pure sciences
Research infrastructures
Research policy
Science & business
Science in society
Security
SMEs
Social sciences and humanities
Space
Special Collections
Transport

Countries
Countries
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Cameroon
  Canada
  China
  Colombia
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Finland
  France
  Georgia
  Germany
  Ghana
  Greece
  Hungary
  Iceland
  India
  Ireland
  Israel
  Italy
  Japan
  Kazakhstan
  Kenya
  Korea
  Latvia
  Lithuania
  Luxembourg
  Malta
  Mexico
  Netherlands
  Nigeria
  Norway
  Peru
  Poland
  Portugal
  Romania
  Russia
  Senegal
  Serbia
  Slovakia
  Slovenia
  South Africa
  Spain
  Swaziland
  Sweden
  Switzerland
  Taiwan
  Tunisia
  Turkey
  Ukraine
  United Kingdom
  United States


   Headlines

Last Update: 09-01-2013  
Related category(ies):
Health & life sciences

 

Add to PDF "basket"

The rising threat of antibiotic resistance

A major European and global health issue is resistance to or inappropriate use of antibiotics. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) estimates that each year, antimicrobial resistance (AMR) results in 25 000 deaths and related costs of over EUR 1.5 billion in healthcare expenses and productivity losses. Over the last four years, there has been a significant increasing trend of combined resistance to multiple antibiotics in both Klebsiella pneumoniae and E. coli in more than one-third of the EU/EEA countries. In addition, in several Member States, between 25 % and up to more than 60 % of Klebsiella pneumoniae from bloodstream infections show combined resistance to multiple antibiotics.

Resistance to antibiotics, a serious threat to the health of Europeans © Shutterstock
Resistance to antibiotics, a serious threat to the health of Europeans
©  Shutterstock

As resistance increases, the number of effective antibiotics drops, meaning that there may be no antibiotics left to fight life-threatening diseases. The situation is all the more serious because antimicrobials have become an essential tool for modern medicine. Many surgical operations could not be performed without them. Moreover, an inability to use the right antibiotics for critically ill patients, owing to bacterial resistance, could seriously jeopardise these people’s chances of survival. According to the ECDC, in the European Union, Norway and Iceland, for example, 400 000 resistant infections are estimated to occur every year.

However, action is being taken. The European Commission has adopted an action plan against the rising threats from AMR with 12 actions for implementation with EU member countries and seven areas where measures have been identified as necessary. These include; making sure antimicrobials are used appropriately in both humans and animals, preventing microbial infections and their spread, developing new effective antimicrobials or alternatives for treatment and improving communication, education and training.

At the global level, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has adopted a strategic action plan on AMR. It aims at strengthening surveillance of antibiotic resistance, promoting rational use of antibiotics, strengthening infection control and surveillance in health care settings, preventing emerging resistance in the veterinary and food sectors, promoting innovation and research on new drugs and improving awareness, patient safety, and partnership

Commenting on the European Commission’s Action Plan, Mrs Testori Coggi, head of the Directorate-General for Health and Consumers, said: 'In order to successfully address antimicrobial resistance, we need to tackle the problem in a comprehensive approach, in which all relevant parties and stakeholders live up to their responsibility to combat this serious health threat in their respective areas. Therefore, there is no hierarchy of actions in the Action Plan, as all aspects are interrelated. Notably, the promotion of prudent use of antibiotics both in human and veterinary medicine, the development of new antimicrobial products and prevention of infections must proceed in parallel.'

The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has also contributed, including by setting-up a Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP), which produced a guideline on the evaluation of medicinal products indicated for treatment of bacterial infections. The guideline addresses the overarching requirement for the development of antibacterial agents that have a direct action on bacteria. The EMA has also launched a public consultation on an addendum to the guideline on the evaluation of medicinal products indicated for treatment of bacterial infections. It provides additional guidance on the requirements for clinical studies related to specific indications and on clinical development programmes for new antibacterial agents targeted at rare or multidrug-resistant pathogens. The public consultation for this guideline ends on 31 January 2013.


Convert article(s) to PDF

No article selected


loading


Search articles

Notes:
To restrict search results to articles in the Information Centre, i.e. this site, use this search box rather than the one at the top of the page.

After searching, you can expand the results to include the whole Research and Innovation web site, or another section of it, or all Europa, afterwards without searching again.

Please note that new content may take a few days to be indexed by the search engine and therefore to appear in the results.

Print Version
Share this article
See also

European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)
WHO Regional Office for Europe — Antimicrobial resistance
European Commission — Public Health
The European Medicines Agency





  Top   Research Information Center