Navigation path

Themes
Agriculture & food
Energy
Environment
ERA-NET
Health & life sciences
Human resources & mobility
Industrial research
Information society
Innovation
International cooperation
Nanotechnology
Pure sciences
Research infrastructures
Research policy
Science & business
Science in society
  Education & popular sciences
  Ethics
  Future science & technology
  Governance
  People in science
  Public opinion
  Science communication
  Science prizes
  Women & science
  Other
Security
SMEs
Social sciences and humanities
Space
Special Collections
Transport

Countries
Countries
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Cameroon
  Canada
  China
  Colombia
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Finland
  France
  Georgia
  Germany
  Ghana
  Greece
  Hungary
  Iceland
  India
  Ireland
  Israel
  Italy
  Japan
  Kazakhstan
  Kenya
  Korea
  Latvia
  Lithuania
  Luxembourg
  Malta
  Mexico
  Netherlands
  Nigeria
  Norway
  Peru
  Poland
  Portugal
  Romania
  Russia
  Senegal
  Serbia
  Slovakia
  Slovenia
  South Africa
  Spain
  Swaziland
  Sweden
  Switzerland
  Taiwan
  Tunisia
  Turkey
  Ukraine
  United Kingdom
  United States


This page was published on 14/12/2007
Published: 14/12/2007

   Headlines

Last Update: 14-12-2007  
Related category(ies):
Science in society

 

Add to PDF "basket"

Stimulating schoolchildren to study science

Schoolchildren and students in EU countries are to be encouraged to develop an interest in science through a project launched by the Association of Petrochemicals Producers in Europe. Xperimania will raise awareness of petrochemistry among young people (from 10 to 20 years old) through science teaching and learning activities in secondary schools throughout the EU, leading to a prize-giving ceremony in 2008.

Encouraging students to study science is a high priority.
Encouraging students to study science is a high priority.

'Xperimania — from molecules to materials' is being coordinated by European Schoolnet, which is a network of 28 education ministries. It encourages schoolchildren and teachers to explore the constituents of petrochemical materials in everyday products such as sports shoes and MP3 players, so they can develop an understanding of the role that petrochemistry plays in the development of many familiar materials that we use regularly.

Three main activities are being carried out: a timeline student investigation of an everyday object made from petrochemicals, with a subsequent report; simple and fun experiments which are then written up in a laboratory report; and online debates and discussions between students and scientists on topics related to the petrochemistry industry’s relationship to society.

At the end of the project, a group of science educators will give out prizes for the best experiments and timeline observations. The winners will be awarded their prizes in a ceremony held at the research laboratory of a petrochemical company.

Xperimania was initiated to address the problem of declining interest in studying scientific subjects among European schoolchildren. This is an issue that is causing great concern to governments and industry. It is posing a threat to European industry and the scientific professions, and to Europe’s future at the cutting edge of scientific research and technology.

The percentage of graduates with science degrees varies from country to country. In Asia, 32 percent of graduates have science degrees, while in China it is 53 percent. In Europe, the figure falls to 28 percent. This scientific brain drain in Europe has a knock-on effect for business and industry: they can’t attract enough scientists to undertake research projects, and therefore they fall behind in their research and technology activities. The attempt to reverse this decline has led to many government-sponsored projects, including paying graduates to train as science teachers.

'Europe needs young, bright and creative talents in order to remain a world leader in innovation,’ says the Association of Petrochemicals Producers in Europe’s Director, Pierre de Kettenis. 'They are essential to develop innovative solutions able to address tomorrow's challenges related to healthcare, food and water supply, and environmental protection. That’s why science education has become a priority for the petrochemical industry, which provides the basic materials to most high-tech products.’


Convert article(s) to PDF

No article selected


loading


Search articles

Notes:
To restrict search results to articles in the Information Centre, i.e. this site, use this search box rather than the one at the top of the page.

After searching, you can expand the results to include the whole Research and Innovation web site, or another section of it, or all Europa, afterwards without searching again.

Please note that new content may take a few days to be indexed by the search engine and therefore to appear in the results.

Print Version
Share this article
See also

Xperimania
EU education and research





  Top   Research Information Center