Navigation path

Themes
Agriculture & food
Energy
Environment
ERA-NET
Health & life sciences
Human resources & mobility
Industrial research
Information society
Innovation
International cooperation
Nanotechnology
Pure sciences
Research infrastructures
Research policy
Science & business
Science in society
  Education & popular sciences
  Ethics
  Future science & technology
  Governance
  People in science
  Public opinion
  Science communication
  Science prizes
  Women & science
  Other
Security
SMEs
Social sciences and humanities
Space
Special Collections
Transport

Countries
Countries
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Finland
  France
  Gambia
  Georgia
  Germany
  Ghana
  Greece
  Hungary
  Iceland
  India
  Indonesia
  Ireland
  Israel
  Italy
  Jamaica
  Japan
  Kazakhstan
  Kenya
  Korea
  Latvia
  Lichtenstein
  Lithuania
  Luxembourg
  Madagascar
  Malaysia
  Malta
  Mexico
  Montenegro
  Morocco
  Mozambique
  Namibia
  Netherlands
  New Zealand
  Nigeria
  Norway
  Panama
  Peru
  Poland
  Portugal
  Romania
  Russia
  Senegal
  Serbia
  Slovakia
  Slovenia
  South Africa
  Spain
  Sri Lanka
  Swaziland
  Sweden
  Switzerland
  Taiwan
  Tanzania
  Thailand
  Tunisia
  Turkey
  Uganda
  Ukraine
  United Kingdom
  United States
  Vietnam


This page was published on 06/07/2005
Published: 06/07/2005

   Science in society

Last Update: 06-07-2005  
Related category(ies):
Human resources & mobility  |  Research policy  |  Science in society

 

Add to PDF "basket"

‘Xplora' has its scientific eye on Europe's future researchers

Bringing science to youth – and youth to science – is the two-way rationale behind ‘Xplora', the new European gateway for science education. Launched in early June, this portal knits together teachers, students and research institutes across the continent via a colourful array of services, database projects, chat rooms, cyber-library resources, events and, above all, opportunities to participate in virtual laboratories and experiments.

Xplora makes learning science fun. © Xplora.org
Xplora makes learning science fun.
© Xplora.org
Xplora is designed to draw the interest of Europe's younger students to the world of science and research. “Research and science start with curiosity. I think this is crucial to encouraging more young people to choose a research career,” Science and Research Commissioner Janez Potočnik recently remarked to students. He and other research policy-makers know that Europe's future ability to innovate largely depends on the talent and strength of the next generations of researchers. Yet not enough young Europeans are entering the R&D realm.

A new push is needed to reverse this trend, and initiatives such as Xplora are part of the solution. Operated by European Schoolnet – a network of 28 ministries of education – the new website has been developed with financial support from the EU's Sixth Framework Programme for Research (FP6) and, notably, from the Nucleus network of EU-funded projects.

Xplora's whole raison d'etre is to make science education fun and interesting for young students. Its playful yet didactic approach to a young audience can be seen right away on the homepage, which amusingly materialises in sequences as a sort of giant eye rising over a lunar-type surface.  Indeed, the depiction of an eye-as-planet forms the ‘o' in Xplora's name. Though some of the site's functions and sub-menu pages still need refining, the graphics and flash files very quickly grab one's attention, prompting the user to investigate its services, projects and resource materials on offer.

Importantly, the site is designed as much for teachers as students. There's an on-line library offering a wide array of teaching resources, such as open-source software and research reports, as well as science-related games and simulations.

Uniting web-heads in science!
One Xplora features that is likely to gain wide popularity among teachers is its facility for web experiments. These offer distinct advantages over their conventional counterparts in that they enable teachers to:

  • conduct an experiment in class which is too expensive, dangerous or complex for a normal school laboratory
  • prepare laboratory sessions that can be carried out by students independently, with each pupil applying a predefined set of parameters to the experiment in order to produce common analysis in the classroom
  • achieve better scientific quality from the combination of experiment-with-database, since many data sets from multiple pupils can achieve real statistical significance

European Commission, Research DG

Convert article(s) to PDF

No article selected


loading


Search articles

Notes:
To restrict search results to articles in the Information Centre, i.e. this site, use this search box rather than the one at the top of the page.

After searching, you can expand the results to include the whole Research and Innovation web site, or another section of it, or all Europa, afterwards without searching again.

Please note that new content may take a few days to be indexed by the search engine and therefore to appear in the results.

Print Version
Share this article
See also

Xplora website


Contacts
rtd-sciencesociety@ec.europa.eu
  Top   Research Information Center