Scientists track a changing Arctic to help communities adapt

Rising temperatures and melting ice in the Arctic will have local and global consequences. But adapting to such changes requires tracking them first. EU-funded researchers are merging Arctic observation systems into a unified network. The results will help determine what is happening and what we can do about it.

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


 

Published: 26 March 2019  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
EnvironmentClimate & global change  |  Ecosystems, incl. land, inland waters, marine
International cooperation
Research policyHorizon 2020
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Belgium  |  Canada  |  China  |  Denmark  |  Finland  |  France  |  Germany  |  Ireland  |  Italy  |  Norway  |  Poland  |  Portugal  |  Russia  |  Spain  |  Sweden  |  United Kingdom  |  United States
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Scientists track a changing Arctic to help communities adapt

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© mandritoiu #196274095, 2019 source: stock.adobe.com

The Arctic environment is changing. Thinning sea ice, rising temperatures, thawing permafrost and a melting ice sheet are only a few of many challenges. Such changes will impact the globe but will also endanger vulnerable Arctic communities that depend upon the region’s resources.

One key problem is a lack of integrated data. Scientists do not have enough information to draw a complete picture of how the Arctic is evolving. Without such knowledge, scientists can only offer incomplete recommendations to policymakers. To slow climate change and to ensure sustainable development, we need more ways of collecting and integrating diverse data on the Arctic and its changing climate.

The EU-funded INTAROS project is developing an integrated Arctic Observation System to extend, improve and unify existing observation systems. Scientists will use the INTAROS portal, iAOS, to access a wide range of existing databases containing atmospheric, oceanic and terrestrial information.

INTAROS will include development of community-based observing systems, where local knowledge is merged with scientific data. Scientists and stakeholders will benefit from new tools for data discovery, analysis and visualisation.

The project will also install new instruments that measure a variety of Arctic parameters, including physical, chemical, biological and ecological changes. Such data will help fill current gaps in remote-sensing and model-prediction capabilities.

INTAROS brings together 49 organisations and 18 countries. It aims to launch a pan-Arctic forum that will help to forge consensus on Arctic issues between EU countries, non-EU countries and transnational organisations. As such, it will set an example of coordination and collaboration in a region where great competition for resources threatens to become the rule.

In the long term, INTAROS’ integrated picture of a changing Arctic aims to help combat climate change and support the marine and maritime industries, fisheries, and environmental management agencies, contributing to sustainable Arctic resource management for the benefit of local communities.

INTAROS, together with seven other H2020 projects, is part of the EU Arctic Research Cluster coordinated by EU PolarNet. The objective is to create synergies among projects and to increase their impacts.

Project details

  • Project acronym: INTAROS
  • Participants: Norway (Coordinator), Sweden, Germany, Poland, Denmark, Finland, UK, Ireland, France, Belgium, Portugal, Spain, Italy, Greenland, Russia, United States, Canada, China
  • Project N°: 727890
  • Total costs: € 15 490 066
  • EU contribution: € 15 490 066
  • Duration: December 2016 to November 2021

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