Super-resolution microscope gives better insight into cells

An EU-funded project to develop a super-resolution microscope platform capable of visualising DNA, mRNA and proteins in living cells could advance regenerative medicine, potentially leading to breakthroughs in replacing or restoring diseased or malfunctioning human cells, tissues or organs.

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


 

Published: 11 February 2019  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Health & life sciencesMedical research
Information societyMicroelectronics and nanotechnology
Innovation
NanotechnologyNanomedicine
Research policyHorizon 2020
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Czechia  |  Germany  |  Israel  |  Spain
Add to PDF "basket"

Super-resolution microscope gives better insight into cells

Image

© 18percentgrey #39048791, 2019 source:stock.adobe.com

For a better understanding of biological processes, researchers need to be able to ‘see’ the smallest components of individual cells, such as DNA, mRNA and proteins.

In response, the EU-funded CELLVIEWER project is developing a super-resolution microscope that uses hardware and software which enables the collection of high-resolution spatial and dynamic information in single cells. The research includes the development of new hardware and software for the microscope.

Since super-resolution microscopy is essential for life science research, this project could promote a radical shift in how cellular systems are studied.

As a test case, scientists are using the new technology to study the self-renewal and differentiation of individual embryonic stem cells in mice. These stem cells can differentiate into other types of cells.

The aim is to collect information at a nanoscale level to develop a model that can be used to predict which stimuli will produce which phenotype in an organism. Scientists want to develop a mechanistic understanding of how multiple single mouse embryonic stem cells maintain their ‘stemness’ or commit to differentiation.

Almost three years into the project, cell biologists now have access to this unique new technology which is expected to enable a better understanding of how embryonic stem cells develop into other types of cells. This, in turn, could potentially be applied to regenerative medicine. According to the project's consortium, no potential problems can be anticipated at this stage in releasing the initial CELLVIEWER prototype for use as a diagnostic tool.

The project team includes internationally recognised experts in the fields of stem cell and chromatin biology, super-resolution microscopy, quantitative modelling of biological systems, and hardware and software development. Their innovative approach to single cell analysis represents a paradigm shift in the way cellular systems are studied, according to the project.

To ensure the technology makes it out of the lab and into the market place, another EU-funded project – known as HERMES SR – is currently developing a business plan to commercialise CELLVIEWER’s super-resolution microscope.

Project details

  • Project acronym: CELLVIEWER
  • Participants: Spain (Coordinator), Germany, Israel, Czechia
  • Project N°: 686637
  • Total costs: € 3 988 752
  • EU contribution: € 3 988 752
  • Duration: February 2016 to January 2020

See also

 

Convert article(s) to PDF

No article selected


loading


Search articles

Notes:
To restrict search results to articles in the Information Centre, i.e. this site, use this search box rather than the one at the top of the page.

After searching, you can expand the results to include the whole Research and Innovation web site, or another section of it, or all Europa, afterwards without searching again.

Please note that new content may take a few days to be indexed by the search engine and therefore to appear in the results.

Print Version
Share this article
See also
Project website
Project details