Remote monitoring boost for long-term patients

Patients with long-term medical conditions, such as depression, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy, need regular monitoring, but having to visit the clinic frequently for tests can be a problem. An EU- and industry-funded project is aiming to implement real-time, on-demand monitoring through remote assessment, to potentially improve patient experience and outcomes and increase clinical efficiency.

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Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czechia
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


 

Published: 9 October 2018  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Health & life sciencesHealth & ageing  |  Health systems & management  |  Major diseases  |  Public health
Innovation
International cooperation
Research policyHorizon 2020
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Belgium  |  Czechia  |  Denmark  |  Germany  |  Italy  |  Netherlands  |  Spain  |  United Kingdom  |  United States
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Remote monitoring boost for long-term patients

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© #217864035 | Author: BillionPhotos.com, 2018 fotolia.com

Under conventional medical practice, monitoring long-term patients is done in the clinic or hospital, assessing such things as treatment effects, adverse events and disease course. In some cases, visits may not be frequent enough to identify individuals at risk of significant changes in disease state, including relapse. On the other hand, having to repeat monitoring procedures too often can be burdensome to both patients and healthcare providers.

The goal of the EU- and industry-funded RADAR-CNS project is to improve the patient-monitoring process through remote assessment. Project team members are creating a process for developing, testing and implementing wearable technologies for the remote measurement of depression, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy.

Although remote monitoring is still in its infancy, interest is growing in the application of such technologies in healthcare. For example, smartphone and wearable sensor technologies have already enabled a significant increase in the volume of patient information that can be collected unobtrusively and at low cost.

The RADAR-CNS team believe such technologies can be used to monitor long-term outcomes of patients, at scale, and provide detailed information on outcomes. The resulting data can be made available for review in real time by patients, clinicians and researchers and at low cost, enabling medical services to offer more responsive and efficient care.

The process includes a data-management and modelling framework, applicable to a variety of disorders and with enough flexibility of design to be future-proofed against further technological innovation.

The team is collecting information about implementation barriers and facilitators gleaned from patients, clinicians, regulators and funding bodies. This will smooth the way for future regulatory approval and uptake.

In bringing remote assessment technologies to the healthcare sector, the RADAR-CNS project may help optimise the number of clinical visits required. This will result in improved efficiency on the part of care givers, as well as real improvements in patient outcomes.

RADAR-CNS is funded by the Innovative Medicines Initiative, a public-private partnership between the EU and the European pharmaceutical industry.

Project details

  • Project acronym: RADAR-CNS
  • Participants: UK (Coordinator), Italy, Netherlands, Spain, Germany, Belgium, United States, Czechia, Denmark
  • Project N°: 115902
  • Total costs: € 25 615 861
  • EU contribution: € 11 000 000
  • Duration: April 2016 to March 2021

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