Learning to spot a structural flaw early

If flaws in infrastructure - a ship or a bridge for example - are spotted early, the damage can be repaired before anyone gets hurt, and before the costs mount. It's a nice theory, but there are currently many uncertainties in ensuring structural safety, as well as a lack of specialists. An EU-funded project is addressing both problems.

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Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


 

Published: 22 November 2017  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Human resources & mobilityMarie Curie Actions
Industrial researchBuilding & construction
Research policyHorizon 2020
Countries involved in the project described in the article
France  |  Ireland  |  Spain  |  United Kingdom
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Learning to spot a structural flaw early

Picture of the worker with yellow protection helmet

© ronstik - fotolia.com

The TRUSS training network is offering intersectoral and multidisciplinary training in structural safety to 14 early stage researchers with interests that include roads, bridges, ships, ship unloading and sensors. Alongside taught modules and secondments in academia and industry, the researchers will also conduct their own research projects.

The training will address the uncertainties inherent in structural safety, such as material strength, response to loads, damage indicators and mathematical models. The young researchers will learn about complex modelling and analysis, as well as how to measure strength and behaviour.

The research conducted within TRUSS will:

  • increase understanding of efficient infrastructure design, assessment monitoring and management;
  • provide the knowledge needed to maintain current infrastructure and keep it operational;
  • help reduce infrastructure costs and demand for the non-renewable and carbon-intensive resources that are used to maintain or improve safety levels.

The results of TRUSS – new understanding of how to keep vital infrastructures safe – have an impact on everyone, and the project is therefore an excellent opportunity to raise awareness of the importance of research into infrastructure. Each young researcher involved in the programme is therefore carrying out at least one outreach activity each year. Recent examples include school visits to encourage girls to consider a career in engineering, and participation in Ireland’s Science Week.

Project details

  • Project acronym: TRUSS
  • Participants: Ireland (Coordinator), United Kingdom, Spain, France
  • Project N°: 642453
  • Total costs: € 3 701 307
  • EU contribution: € 3 701 307
  • Duration: January 2015 to December 2018

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