Navigation path

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  Gambia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  Gambia
  Georgia


  

Published: 17 October 2017  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Human resources & mobilityMarie Curie Actions
Innovation
Pure sciencesAstronomy
Research policySeventh Framework Programme
Science in societyPeople in science
Space
Countries involved in the project described in the article
France  |  Germany  |  Italy  |  United Kingdom
Add to PDF "basket"

Sharper focus on gravitational waves

The detection of gravitational waves in 2015 provided groundbreaking information about the Universe. Building on this discovery, EU-funded scientists have now detected waves at three observatories, a first in astrophysics, making it possible to locate the signals’ origin and better apply the data they provide.

Image of hand holding basket full of fresh vegetables

© cherezoff - fotolia.com

Young researchers from the GRAWITON project, funded through the EU’s Marie Skłodowska-Curie training programme, have contributed to research that has recorded gravitational waves from a single source at three locations – a first in astrophysics.

Gravitational waves come from distant powerful collisions in space. Almost imperceptible by the time they reach Earth, they were first recorded by two observatories in 2015 in work that won the 2017 Nobel Prize for physics. Data from three locations allows scientists to triangulate measurements so that they can more precisely locate the waves’ source for further observations and better understand the Universe.

A place at the forefront

“This opens up a new era in multi-messenger astronomy,” says GRAWITON coordinator Michele Punturo of Italy’s Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) and the European Gravitational Observatory (EGO).

Many astrophysical sources emit both photons – measured by telescopes – and gravitational waves, he explains: “They provide different information about their source. These messengers can also travel differently through the Universe. By combining the information from photons and gravitational waves, we can learn much more about their source and about the structure of the Universe”.

The waves were recorded at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors at Louisiana and Washington in the US – which detected the first waves in 2015 – and the European Virgo detector near Pisa, Italy. Among the 1 250 scientists from 21 countries that worked toward this result are 13 early-stage researchers supported by GRAWITON. The researchers helped develop the equipment and data analysis used to measure gravitational waves.

“GRAWITON has a double value,” says Punturo. “It inserts young researchers into very large collaborations that are at the cutting edge of research and supports collaboration between LIGO and Virgo.”

Analysis of other data from the detectors is being finalised and more results will be announced soon, he adds.

Project details

  • Project acronym: GRAWITON
  • Participants: Italy (coordinator), Germany, UK, France
  • Project N°: 606176
  • Total costs: € 3 670 303
  • EU contribution: € 3 670 303
  • Duration: February 2014 - January 2018

See also

 

Convert article(s) to PDF

No article selected


loading


Search articles

Notes:
To restrict search results to articles in the Information Centre, i.e. this site, use this search box rather than the one at the top of the page.

After searching, you can expand the results to include the whole Research and Innovation web site, or another section of it, or all Europa, afterwards without searching again.

Please note that new content may take a few days to be indexed by the search engine and therefore to appear in the results.

Print Version
Share this article
See also
Project website
Project details


  Top   Research Information Center
 
Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  Gambia
  Georgia

Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  Gambia
  Georgia