Embracing the darkness beyond standard physics

Much of the material composing the cosmos is dark matter, a strange substance we can't see or touch. So how do we know it's there? Actually, we don't, but scientists largely agree that it must be, inferring its presence from gravitational effects observed in space. An EU-funded project is analysing cosmic rays in a bid to find further clues.

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Countries
Countries
  Algeria
  Argentina
  Australia
  Austria
  Bangladesh
  Belarus
  Belgium
  Benin
  Bolivia
  Brazil
  Bulgaria
  Burkina Faso
  Cambodia
  Cameroon
  Canada
  Cape Verde
  Chile
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Cyprus
  Czech Republic
  Denmark
  Ecuador
  Egypt
  Estonia
  Ethiopia
  Faroe Islands
  Finland
  France
  French Polynesia
  Georgia


 

Published: 22 December 2016  
Related theme(s) and subtheme(s)
Research policyHorizon 2020
Space
Countries involved in the project described in the article
Estonia
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Embracing the darkness beyond standard physics

Image of the milky way at night

© vchalup - fotolia.com

Coffee cups, smartphones, doughnuts — at some level, they’re all mere matter. The standard model of particle physics encompasses the basic building blocks of everything we see around us. It explains a lot about the world we know, but very little about the worlds beyond it.

Dark matter, for example, is beyond its reach, and yet this intriguing material is thought to be far more abundant than the ‘normal’ stuff. Evidence of its existence is derived from the movements of astronomical objects and the way light bends around them, which hint at lots of “missing” mass.

The perplexing properties of this type of matter, which is undetectable to our senses, suggest that there are fundamentally different particles involved. Scientists around the world are attempting to shine a light into this unknown territory, notably by studying the scope to detect dark matter by other means.

“New physics in space” is one such project exploring the possibility of new physics beyond our experience. Launched in December 2015 for a period of two years, it focuses on the analysis of cosmic rays as a means to learn more about dark matter and its constituent particles.

More specifically, the project will look into an anomaly observed in the composition of cosmic radiation, which might be partly caused by the annihilation or decay of dark matter particles. The research is backed by a fellowship grant awarded by the Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions of the Horizon 2020 programme.

Project details

  • Project acronym: NewPhysicsInSpace
  • Participants: Estonia (Coordinator)
  • Project N°: 661103
  • Total costs: € 148 582
  • EU contribution: € 148 582
  • Duration: December 2015 – December 2017

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