IMPORTANT LEGAL NOTICE - The information on this site is subject to adisclaimerand acopyright notice
 
Contact   |   Search on EUROPA  
 Mediterranean Countries > A treasured environment
Previous
Home
Next

A treasured environment

illustration

The Mediterranean basin is already home to more than 500 million people and is host to millions of tourists every year. What happens in one part of the Mediterranean will have an effect on another. Land use patterns have shaped Mediterranean landscapes and societies over the millennia to how we know them today. Sustainable societies and their development hinge on new ways to reconcile socio-economic productivity and the environment. International research co-operation in the Mediterranean Sea area offers a knowledge-based approach to planning and managing environmental resources; when examining the merits of potential projects, their impact on the whole ecosystem is taken into account.

INCO's activities touch on many areas including coastal resource management, sustainable tourism and leisure, forestry, conservation, and grazing and land management practices. All work comes back to the mantra of environmental sustainability, and projects are expected to provide local benefits that are benign and indeed valuable to the Mediterranean as a whole. The built environment is also being cared for through a number of projects designed to preserve and maintain important sites of cultural heritage, along with research into prevention of damage due to seismic activities.

Changing land use forever

illustration

Forestry and grazing has put pressure on land in the Western Mediterranean region, resulting in problems such as soil degradation and water depletion. The Medchange project investigated changes made by man (and the prevailing natural conditions) in Morocco, Tunisia and the Iberian Peninsula, and assessed possible future trends for land use. The results will be used to direct sustainable development policies in rural areas and will help in the conception and implementation of land management practices.

 

Cedars branch out

A study of cedars in Turkey, Morocco and Lebanon will lead to commercially sustainable exploitation of the tree as a crop. Scientists have completed a biodiversity audit of different cedar types and carried out tests to find the most appropriate type for production. The next step is to establish an environmentally friendly production system which can safeguard and enrich the natural biodiversity of production areas. Social, as well as biological considerations are being taken into account, through consultation with NGOs, ministries and commercial stakeholders.

Previous
Home
Next
Confirming the international role of community research