Important legal notice
Contact   |   Search on Europa   

Infectious Diseases Graphic element print icon Graphic element
  Homepage
Graphic element General information
  RTD Infectious Diseases Unit
  Developing countries
  EDCTP
   
Graphic element Projects
  About FP6 Funding
  FP6 projects
  About FP5 Funding
  FP5 projects
   
   
Graphic element Addressed Diseases
  HIV/AIDS
- News
  Malaria
  Tuberculosis
   
Graphic element Calls for proposals
  FP7 Calls
   
Graphic element Contact corner
  Unit
  Scientific officers
  Subscribe to our mailing list
   
 
EUROVAC I
HIV/AIDS
Framework programme: 5
Project number:
QLK2-CT-1999-01321
EC contribution: € 8 845 000
Duration: 36 months
Type: RS
Starting date: 1 January 2000
Graphic element European Vaccine Effort Against HIV/AIDS
Keywords: AIDS vaccine; phase I HIV vaccine trial ; vaccinia virus recombinant vaccine vectors; HIV-1 subtypes B and C; prime-boost HIV vaccine

Summary:

The EuroVac cluster has two main objectives. The first is to conduct and analyse a phase I randomised study in healthy, HIV-1 seronegative human volunteers at low risk of infection, using a recombinant pox virus prime-recombinant env glycoprotein boost regimen. The second objective is to improve the first generation vaccine on the basis of experiments in non-human primates. The work will specifically focus on the immunogenicity of two different vaccinia virus recombinants (MVA vs NYVAC) with identical HIV-1 subtype B gag-pol-nef and env antigens and of identical vaccinia virus recombinant with antigens of different subtypes (NYVAC-B vs NYVAC-C) for priming, and of homologous (NYVAC-C + rgp120 subtype C) versus heterologous (NYVAC-B + rgp120 subtype C) protein for boosting.

Description:

Firstly, GMP and GLP lots, suitable for use in non-human and human trials, are being produced.  This includes optimising the codon usage of the genes (gag, pol, env and nef) to be included into the first generation EuroVac vaccine. These genes will be constructed into NYVAC and MVA vaccinia vectors, and a protein will be produced derived from the env gene. A clinical trial in humans at low risk will be conducted under GCP at two clinical sites for the efficient recruitment of volunteers.  All data will be taken to a single database for quality assurance and analysis.  Repositories and databases will be set up to assure that clinical samples will be handled appropriately, documented prudently and analysed accurately.  In parallel, the common prime-boost concept will be evaluated in non-human primates.  A rhesus macaque colony is being used that has been pedigreed, based on well-defined MHC antigens.  In the so-called SHIV model, the efficacy of the vaccine concept under investigation in the human phase I trial will be tested.  To this end, pathogenic and non-pathogenic SHIV challenge stocks will be produced with both the inclusion of the HIV-1 subtype C env gene also employed in the human vaccine and derived from an Asian strain, and of a HIV-1 subtype C env gene from an African strain.  To improve the first generation vaccine tested in humans, regimens including DNA priming-NYVAC or MVA boosting, DNA priming – Semliki Forest Virus replicon boosting and Semliki Forest Virus replicon priming – NYVAC or MVA boosting, will be evaluated in non-human primates. Novel techniques will be developed to test the immunogenicity of the various vaccines in both humans and non-human primates. These will include new technologies to assess systemic and local mucosal T-cell responses, chemokine responses and B-cell responses.  Finally, EuroVac will attempt to improve the antigens and the way antigens are presented to induce better and longer lasting neutralising antibody and chemokine responses. In addition, nasal administration of recombinant vaccinia vectors will be compared to recombinant salmonella vaccines for the induction of mucosal immunity.

Coordinator:

Peter Liljeström
Microbiology and Tumourbiology Centre
Karolinska Institutet
171 77 Stockholm
Sweden
Tel: +46 8 457 25 51
Fax: +46 8 31 08 48

Partners:

Principal
Scientific
Participants
Official Address Other Information
2Marc GirardChimie et Biochimie Macromoleculaires, UMR 103
CNRS
46 Avenue d’Italie
FR-69364 Lyon Cedex 07
France
3Roberto AccollaDepartment of Clinical and Biological Sciences
University of Insubria
IT-Varese
Italy
4Neil M. AlmondDepartment of Retrovirology
AIDS Collaborating Centre NIBSC
UK-Herts
United Kingdom
5Abdel BabikerClinical Trials Unit
HIV Division, Medical Research Council
UK-London
United Kingdom
6Mariano EstebanCentro Nacional de Biotecnologia
Campus Universidad Autonoma
ES-Madrid
Spain
7Christian GeninGroupe Immunité des Muqueuses et Agents Pathogènes
Université Jean Monte of St Etienne
FR-Saint-Etienne
France
8Reinhardt GlückBerna Biotech Ltd, R&D Department
CH-Berne
Switzerland
9Tom HankeMRC Human Immunology Unit
Institute of Molecular Medicine
UK-Oxford
United Kingdom
10Jonathan Luke HeeneyDepartment of Virology
Biomedical Primate Research Centre
NL-Rijswijk
The Netherlands
11Simon JeffsDivision of Retrovirology
National Institute for Biological Standards and Control
UK-Hertfordshire
United Kingdom
12Michel KleinR&D Office
Aventis Pasteur
FR-Marcy l’Etoile
France
13Jean-Pierre KraehenbuhlSwiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research and Institute of Biochemistry
CH-Epalinges
Switzerland
14Thomas LehnerDepartment of Immunobiology
Kings College London
Guy’s and St Thomas' Hospital
UK-London
United Kingdom
15Paolo LussoDIBIT Unit of Human Virology
Fondazione Centro San Raffaele del Monte Tabor
IT-Milano
Italy
16Andrew McMichaelMRC Human Immunology Unit
Institute of Molecular Medicine
John Radcliffe Hospital
UK-Oxford
United Kingdom
17Christiane MoogUnité INSERM 74 sur la Pathogénie des Infections Virales Persistantes
Institut Nationale de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale
FR-Strasbourg
France
18Bernhard MoserTheodor-Kocher Institute
University of Bern
CH-Bern
Switzerland
19Hans Acha-OrbeaLudwig Institute for Cancer Research
CH-Epalinges
Switzerland
20Georgios PollakisDepartment of Human Retrovirology
Academisch Ziekenhuis bij de Universiteit van Amsterdam
NL-Amsterdam
The Netherlands
21Giuseppe PantaleoLaboratory of AIDS Immunopathogenesis
Department of Medicine
Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois
CH-Lausanne
Switzerland
22William PaxtonDepartment of Human Retrovirology
Academisch Ziekenhuis bij de Universiteit van Amsterdam
NL-Amsterdam
The Netherlands
23Quentin SattentauDepartment of Infectious Diseases
Imperial College School of Medicine
UK-London
United Kingdom
24Giuseppe ScalaDepartment of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnology
Universita “Frederico-II”
IT-Naples
Italy
25Jean-Claude SirardSwiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research
CH-Epalinges
Switzerland
26Ralf WagnerInstitute of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene
University Regensburg
DE-Regensburg
Germany
27Jonathan Norden WeberDepartment of Infectious Diseases
Imperial College School of Medicine
UK-London
United Kingdom
28Hans J. WolfInstitute of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene
University Regensburg
DE-Regensburg
Germany

 
 
top
Graphic element