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CASA
HIV/AIDS (INCO)
Framework programme: 5
Project number:
ICA4-CT-2001-10016
EC contribution: € 384 000
Duration: 30 months
Type: CA
Starting date: 1 January 2002
Graphic element Optimising the Use of the Syndromic Approach for STI Management and Prevention in Resource Poor Settings

Summary:

More efficient and effective healthcare systems in reproductive healthcare will be promoted through improvements of the use of the syndromic approach for STI management and prevention in resource poor settings with high STI and HIV incidence. Locally relevant systems that will optimise field performance of the syndromic approach for STI management, in particular for STI in women, will be obtained through reconsidering existing tools and systems and at different levels of the health delivery system. The acceptability of the syndromic approach for STI management for health providers and users will be improved through a concerted action in four sub-Saharan countries. Co-operation with scientists and policy-makers from four European institutions involved in health system development and the development of diagnostic tools will continue to enhance effectiveness, coverage and quality of existing primary healthcare services.

Objectives:

The objective is to promote more efficient and effective healthcare systems in reproductive healthcare through improvements in the use of the syndromic approach for STI management, and prevention in resource poor settings with high STD and HIV incidence. Locally relevant systems that will optimise field performance of the syndromic approach for STI management, in particular for STI in women, will be obtained through reconsidering existing tools and systems and at different levels of the health delivery system. The acceptability of the syndromic approach for STI management for health providers and users will be improved in four sub-Saharan countries. Cooperation between scientists and policy-makers involved in health system development and the development of diagnostic tools will continue to enhance effectiveness, coverage and quality of existing primary healthcare services.

Description:

An international and national review of literature on the introduction of the syndromic approach for STI management in resource poor settings will lead to the first international expert meeting. During this meeting, the literature reviews will be analysed and discussed. They will create the basis for defining the standardised tools for researching the factors favouring and constraining the syndromic approach adoption by healthcare providers in the four sub-Saharan countries participating in this concerted action. The level of acceptability for healthcare providers of public and private services, as well as the clinical practices of these providers, and their associated reasons will be researched. The level of acceptability for health service users will also be assessed. Special attention will be given to the management of STI in women. Tools and strategies for potential improvement of acceptability and field performance will be formulated in each of the four countries during a national workshop where the study results will be summarised. During the final international conference, the Delphi method will be used to create a framework for the identification of factors related to the success or defeat of the syndromic approach for STI management in resource poor settings. Areas and means for potential improvement of acceptability and field performance of syndromic STI management will be found, leading to country specific recommendations. From the framework, further strategies for improving policy and service development will be recommended, leading to more efficient, rational and sustainable syndromic management of STI in resource poor settings with high STD and HIV incidence.

Milestones:

International literature review of factors favouring and constraining the introduction and use of the syndromic approach for STI management in resource poor settings, including country-specific data on four countries with high STD and HIV incidence.

Publications on acceptability and associated factors for users, and public and private healthcare providers of the syndromic approach.

Relevant recommendations for tools and strategies to improve the policy and service development.

Coordinator:

Marleen Temmerman
International Centre for Reproductive Health
Ghent University
De Pintelaan 185, 2P3
BE-9000 Ghent
Tel: +32 9 240 3564
Fax: +32 9 240 3867
E-mail: marleen.temmerman@ugent.be
Website: http://www.icrh.org

Partners:

  1. Anita Hardon
    University of Amsterdam
    Faculty of Political and Socio-Cultural Sciences
    Anthropological Sociological Centre
    Oudezijds Achterburgwal 185
    NL-1012 DK Amsterdam
    The Netherlands
    Tel: +31 20 525 26 70
    Fax: +31 20 525 30 10 hardon@pscw.uva.nl
  2. Loretta Brabin
    Academic Unit of Obstetrics and Gynaecology,
    University of Manchester
    St Mary’s Hospital (1st floor)
    Whitworth Park
    UK – M13 9PL Manchester
    United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 161 276 6388
    Fax: +44 161 276 6134
    E-mail: Loretta.brabin@man.ac.uk
  3. Paulo Ferrinho
    Association for Development Co-operation Garcia de Orta
    Rua Frederico Perry Vidal, Bloco 9 – Piso 1
    PT-1900-240 Lisbon
    Portugal
    Tel: +35 1 21 845 2912
    Fax: +35 1 21 843 06 87
    E-mail: nop05938@mail.telepac.pt
  4. Bwayo
    Department of Medical Microbiology
    University of Nairobi
    PO Box 196 76
    Nairobi
    Kenya
    Tel: +254 2 719 628
    Fax: +254 2 714 613
    E-mail: bwayo@kavi.uon.org
  5. Edward Kirumira
    Department of Sociology
    Faculty of Social Sciences
    Makerere University
    Box 7062
    Kampala
    Uganda
    Tel: +256 41 540 650
    Fax: +256 41 533 665
    E-mail: kirumira@starcom.co.ug
  6. Joyce Munthali
    College of Medicine, University of Malawi
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
    Private Bag 360
    Chichiri
    Blantyre 3
    Malawi
    Tel: +265 1 692683
    Fax: +265 1 674 700
    E-mail: joycewangui@yahoo.com
  7. Rui Bastos
    Department of Dermatology
    University of Eduardo Mondlane
    Hospital Central Maputo
    Ave Agustinho Neto
    Maputo
    Mozambique
    Tel: +258 1 428 319
    Fax: +258 1 428 319
    E-mail: rbdermat@tropical.co.mz

 
 
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