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ConFluTech


Public Health Aspects, Networking and Training

Capacity Building for the Control of Avian Influenza Through Technology Transfer and Training

EC contribution
: € 547 255
Duration
: 36 months
Starting date
: 01/07/07
Instrument
: SSA
Keywords
: Avian influenza, polymerase chain reaction, epidemiology, disease outbreak
Project Number
: SSPE-CT-2006-044462
Web-site
: www.fz-borstel.de

Summary:

Avian influenza (AI) or 'bird flu' is a highly contagious viral infection which can affect all species of birds and can manifest itself in different ways depending mainly on the pathogenicity of the virus involved and on the species affected. The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus causes serious disease with high mortality (up to 100%) - notifiable to the OIE. Worryingly, HPAI has been shown to infect and cause death in humans. Up to now, a total of 103 deaths have been recorded due to HPAI infection in a number of countries such as Vietnam, Turkey and Iraq (WHO, 21 March 2006).

Beside the fact that a number of countries were surprised by the outbreaks, an even greater number of developing countries do not have adequate tools to detect and differentiate HPAI and are lacking experience to manage the outbreak of the disease. Thus, there is an urgent need for technology transfer and training. To fulfil these gaps, the partners of this consortium will:

  1. organise technical workshops to facilitate technology transfer particularly in the field of molecular diagnostic tools for pathogen detection and differentiation, to reinforce epidemiological analysis for monitoring and modelling of avian influenza especially and to respond to outbreaks of infectious diseases of livestock in general;
  2. provide training through organisation of seminars and short-term courses in well qualified laboratories of a number of EU Member States;
  3. organise technical workshops, courses and training in the INCO target countries to improve the technical experimental level of the staff and laboratories in charge of livestock infectious diseases.
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